Advertising & Marketing Events
Event Date Location

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

advertising-marketing

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Digital advertising hits $43B, passing broadcast TV for the first time ever

VentureBeat

This past year, digital advertising online and via mobile crossed the $40 billion mark for the first time ever, according to the Internet Advertising Bureau. Since 2004, the average growth rate has been 18 percent. And this year, digital ad revenues surpassed broadcast television for the first time.

Not shockingly, mobile is leading the charge.

Search remains the largest overall category, at $18.4 billion, and display hit $7.9 billion, according to the IAB’s numbers, but those categories are growing much slower than mobile and digital video ads. Search is “only” growing at 8.6 percent, while mobile ad revenue jumped 110 percent to $7.1 billion last year, and digital video ad revenue has tripled over the past few years to $2.8 billion.

It’s important to note that, while web and mobile advertising revenues beat out broadcast TV for the first time, broadcast + cable advertising revenues still dwarf the digital take. And, of course, networks are aggressively expanding to new digital means of distribution.

While the digital ad market is expanding, it’s also extraordinarily concentrated — perhaps more so than any advertising market since there were just three TV networks.

Read more…

Millennials Trust User-Generated Content 50% More Than Other Media

Mashable

It seems as if millennials have avoided traditional media ever since they learned how to read.

The results of new research by marketing startup Crowdtap and the global research company Ipsos shed new light on how the connected generation gets its news. When it comes to trust, it turns out, millennials almost always choose their peers over professionals.

User-generated content (UGC) is media created by your peers. It includes status updates, blog posts and restaurant reviews — any content from non-professionals without any real motivation besides adding an opinion to the sea of already existing opinions. In a more logical world, it isn’t the type of content we’d trust over a professional’s review.

Ipsos’ study, however, reveals that millennials trust UGC just as much as professional reviews. UGC is also 20% more influential when it comes to purchasing and 35% more memorable than other types of media. You can chalk that up to the fact that millennials spend five hours per day with UGC.

The infographic below gives the visual breakdown of how much time millennials are spending with UGC, where they’re getting it and how it’s affecting the media landscape.

Click to see infographic

New Expectations for CMOs

IDG Connect 0811 New Expectations for CMOs

In a new CMO report from Deloitte and Salesforce ExactTarget Marketing Cloud, the 5 new CMO expectations were discussed. The 5 expectations were:

  1. Take on Topline Growth
  2. Own the Customer Experience
  3. Dig Into Data-Based Insights
  4. Operate in Real Time
  5. Master the Metrics that Matter

Are CMOs ready to face these expectations? Not really, but they’re getting there. 53% of CMOs feel the pressure to enable revenue growth, but they struggle because they don’t completely own the conversion path. This has been one of the bigger problems that CMOs are facing; they have to work across functions in order to get things done. This comes into play with the customer experience, too. CMOs now own the largest share of the customer journey, but they need to work with product and service teams in order to create an optimal customer experience across all channels. There’s no doubt that CMOs are feeling the pressure of the digital era, but with that comes big opportunity for growth and the ability to reach all of these high expectations.

Continue reading…

The beginner’s guide to measuring social media ROI

Ragan

For a marketer, return on investment defines a campaign’s success, and many executives demand hard numbers.

According to a study of marketing expertsperformed by Domo, however, three out of four marketing experts can’t measure social media ROI.

Let’s look at the basic yet vital aspects of social media marketing ROI.

1. ‘Likes’ and follows: Measuring engagement

The simplest way to gauge social media ROI involves counting followers on Twitter, your “likes” on Facebook, and consumer affiliations on all your other social media sites.

Keeping a spreadsheet to track social media conversions (followers, “likes,” etc.) gives you data to show that your campaign delivered X new social media connections. Facebook shares and Twitter retweets are also vital to documenting a campaign’s success.

Simple tools like Facebook Insights and Twitter Analytics help you track a specific post’s success, pinpointing customers’ response to particular types of content.

To measure the success of a given keyword, hashtag, or unique topic, try Brandwatch, GroSocial, and Keyhole. They explain trends on social networks for the keywords you enter.

Continue reading…

(Re)defining multimedia journalism

Medium

There’s no consensus among journalists about what the term multimediameans, or even whether to use it anymore.

The multimedia skills listed in a job advertisement might span a range of specialties from web developer to videographer. Some ads specify “proficiency in multimedia” with no further explanation. A 2013 ad seeking a multimedia producer was more precise: “Your core duties will involve a variety of multimedia — audio, video, photos, informational graphics, and motion graphics — to support our core news content.”

“One of the most pressing needs mentioned by journalists in various countries was the acquisition of new multimedia skills,” according to findings from a recent study that surveyed more than 29,000 journalists around the world.

Despite the continuing use of the term multimedia, not every journalist thinks it should be used nowadays. Eric Maierson, a producer at MediaStorm since 2006, hates the word multimedia. There is irony in that, because until recently, MediaStorm called itself a “multimedia production studio.” However, Maierson explained: “I believe ‘multimedia’ is the word we’ve come to use when describing photographers who make documentaries.” (Nowadays MediaStorm calls itself a “film production and interactive design studio” and produces mostly video documentaries. Past projects include Crisis Guide: Iran, a good example of pre–“Snow Fall” multimedia.)

Read more…

Does Your Digital Content Play the Dating Game?

IDG Connect 0811 Does Your Digital Content Play the Dating Game?

There is a strong tendency to put the date of publication on digital content assets or mention a time period within them. Doing that changes an asset to have a limited shelf life as the assets time clock starts ticking. And tick it does, as B2B buying team members are less patient then in the past when it comes to assets they consider too old.

Four years ago IDG Connect conducted extensive buyer preference research among enterprise organizations. At that time, buyers stated that a asset was considered too old if it was 14 months or more past its offering or publication date. It’s important to note that once an asset went beyond 18 months, buyers stated that it negatively affected their perception of the vendor. The benchmark was clear, and content management required keeping content fresh enough for buyer needs.

Now that age baseline has shifted, compressing the acceptable limits of content before it is considered old. New global research conducted by IDG Connect among enterprise buyers in the US and United Kingdom reveal that in both markets content is considered old after 10 months and has negative impact on perception after 13 months. But there are some clear ways for vendors to avoid negative perception among buyers who prefer content currency.

1. Avoid Unnecessary Dating: Look at you asset portfolio and confirm your tendency to inadvertently highlight content that is dated with a limited shelf life. Those limitations can come from something as simple as the asset identification system you use. If the date of publication is part of your numbering and tracking method, consider making a change to something that is coded, so you understand from the system the date of the asset but that will not be clear to those that consume it.

2. Set Dated Asset Standards: Set standards for content that requires dating. This can include assets that present market research.  Some content types do require dating. One area is assets that include research where buyers want  assurance that they consume insight that reflects current sentiment or trends. For that type of content, insure that you have set refresh points to update the findings. Vendors should conduct research to periodically refresh their view of market conditions even if it is for internal purposes. But both in  cases for external thought leadership or internal strategy and planning, make it an annual event at a minimum.

Continue reading…

The latest publisher subscription model: memberships

Digiday

A digital media riddle for 2014: When is a subscription more than just a subscription? Answer: When it’s a membership.

In response to incredible shrinking ad revenue and mounting pressure to diversify their revenue streams, publishers are increasingly building out tertiary businesses like brand content studios and research products. But at a handful of niche outlets, publishers are experimenting with something more akin to the public radio model: more inclusive membership experiences for its most-avid readers.

Adherents of the membership model —  from the National Journal, The Guardian and tech blog Pando – claim memberships can both pull in more dollars and develop more engaged audiences. It is, they say, more than just a semantic variation on the subscription.

“Memberships are a fundamentally better way for us to serve our audience. We can start a dialogue with our audience and ask them what’s keeping them awake at night and give them solutions,” said Poppy MacDonald, publisher and co-president of National Journal, the Atlantic Media-owned magazine aimed at Washington insiders.

National Journal’s membership program, which it started three years ago, gives readers perks like weekly policy summaries, access to its policymaker database, and networking events for “modest four- to high-five-figure investment” a month. Reader response has been significant by itself, MacDonald said, but it’s also had ancillary effects on the National Journal’s existing subscription businesses: The magazine’s membership program has helped boost its formerly slumping magazine renewal rates to “well above” the 85 percent industry average.

Continue reading…

What went wrong at Digital First Media — and what’s next?

Poynter

The announced shutdown of Digital First Media’s national newsroomWednesday and the probable sale of its 75 daily newspapers later this year is a significant jolt to those who believe a viable business model for rapid transformation of legacy operations is close at hand.

CEO John Paton’s explanation in his blog that the company has decided to dismantle Project Thunderdome “to go in a new direction” barely hints at the converging economic troubles.

Most basically, the very able editor Jim Brady (a Poynter National Advisory Board member) and his lieutenants were like a crack auto racing team trying to succeed in a highly competitive field driving Chevy Cobalts.

The two companies that were merged into Digital First, Journal Register and MediaNews, have both been through bankruptcies, Journal Register twice. Both had been under-invested for years in content management systems and other essential technology.

Steve Buttry, who was just months into “Project Unbolt” to hasten the break from print habits to digital, told me the four pilot papers for that project all had different CMSes, none of them especially good.

It is myth, embraced by digital future-of-news enthusiasts, that Web publishing is close to free. Paton seemed of that view early in his tenure when he asked newsrooms to use mainly free tools to put out their reports for a week.

But in his most recent manifesto/speech to the Online Publishers Association in January, he said he was looking for another $100 million to invest in the company’s digital activities on top of an earlier $100 million.

Continue reading…

The Ins And Outs Of Buying Media Via RTB

MediaPost

RTB is growing even faster that we expected. eMarketer predicts that U.S. advertisers will spend $8.69 billion on RTB ads by 2017. RTB’s growth isn’t just from display advertising — it’s now rapidly expanding into mobile and video, and some even predict that it will eventually move to TV.

There are many ins and outs of buying media over RTB, which can be confusing for brands that are just beginning to enter the marketplace. The variables in pricing, management systems and types of campaign deliveries can be daunting. Here’s what we’ve learned along the road to successfully delivered ad impressions:

Valuing a Bid

There is a level of sophistication that brands must take into account when it comes to bid management, and I’m not convinced it is as prevalent in the market as many may think. It’s pretty obvious that flat-bid pricing exists, since many bids are won around “round numbers” like $1 or $1.50. If the market was truly using really variable bid pricing, it would be highly unlikely for those bid numbers to remain as static as they do. Although publishers setting (round number) floors on their pricing is one reason that prices don’t fall further.

Sophisticated players value every bid differently as they let the data inform/determine the market value of the person you are bidding for. Data such as context, time of day and ad sequence all add up to give a specific value at any given moment in time. The only way to do this is to have optimization engines that can calculate bids based on outcomes you are looking for (CPA, CPC, or other metrics).

Read more…

How Nielsen’s OCR Will Impact Digital Video Advertising

MediaPost

For decades, the gross rating point (GRP) metric has been used in television advertising to calculate campaign exposure with respect to reach and frequency against a target demographic audience. GRPs are  now available for digital video advertising through Nielsen online campaign ratings (OCR). The ad industry had been pushing for the ability to compare TV buys to digital video — and it’s finally arrived, opening the door to a new kind of conversation between TV and digital buyers.

Digital buyers need to prepare for this before it happens. They have an opportunity to evaluate digital video advertising through the lens of a TV buyer before it’s forced on them. If there’s ever a time to be proactive about something, it’s now. Here’s how a digital buyer can be proactive with respect to GRP measurement:

First, recognize that the only impressions that matter to a TV buyer are those that reach the target demographic. For example, if the on-target demo is men ages 18-34, any impressions that reach anyone outside this demo will be considered wasted impressions. So, evaluating a digital buy on TV standards means considering off-target impressions as waste.

Second, develop an in-depth understanding of how well the digital video impressions bought for a campaign match the campaign’s on-target demo. It would be easy here to assume that, thanks to audience buying, a digital video buy would have very low levels of off-target waste. However, when Nielsen OCR is used to evaluate the on-target percent of a digital buy, it’s using different data than any third-party demographic data used for audience buying today. Digital buyers will want to understand the discrepancies between the targeting they’ve been using and the on-target percent evaluation that’s built into OCR.

Read more…