Events
Event Date Location

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

OMMA mCommerce

08/07/2014 New York New York

CIO 100 Symposium & Awards

08/17/2014 - 08/19/2014 Rancho Palos Verdes CA

Mobile Insider Summit

08/17/2014 - 08/20/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

Social Media Insider Summit

08/20/2014 - 08/23/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

iMedia Agency Summit (Malaysia)

08/25/2014 - 08/27/2014 Kota Kinabalu Malaysia

The 6th annual Mobile World

08/28/2014 Seoul

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

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News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Brands ‘not ready’ for digital era

Warc

Many brands are still “not ready for the digital era” as their marketing departments lack the skillsets necessary to thrive in the connected age, a leading executive has argued.

Speaking at the 2014 Association of National Advertisers (ANA) Digital & Social Media Conference, Bob Liodice, the organisation’s president/ceo, asserted that technology was a “critical enabler” for brands.

But exploiting the opportunities currently available – from formulating one-to-one conversations to driving innovation and pursuing purpose-driven branding – will require a significant shift in skillsets.

“We need to build skills,” Liodice said. (For more, including insights from senior marketers from Unilever, Ford and more, read Warc’s exclusive report: ANA’s Liodice outlines challenges (and opportunities) for the digital age.)

At present, he continued, the majority of organisations do not have the requisite talent in place to move ahead at the desired speed.

“Survey after survey suggests that we’re not ready for the digital era,” Liodice said.

“We found, in one survey, that only 25% of marketers said that they have the skillset necessary to be able to take advantage of the opportunities that are now afforded to them.”

Taking the next step, he reported, would demand a transition in mindset away from the existing marketing model towards a genuinely integrated approach.

“We essentially need to make a change from digital marketing to marketing in a digital age,” the ANA’s president/ceo asserted.

Marc Pritchard, Procter & Gamble’s global brand building officer, has put forward a similar theory, as he reflected that traditional ideas of digital marketing were almost “dead”.

Liodice drew attention to other marketers who had elaborated on such themes, like Joe Tripodi, evp/chief marketing and commercial officer at soft drinks giant Coca-Cola, who has called on brands to “embrace the values of millennials”.

Antonio Lucio, global chief brand officer at financial services group Visa, has further asserted that millennials are the most “equipped” to drive change, adding that “digital natives will rule the world”.

Yusuf Medhi, chief marketing and strategy officer for the XBOX games console at Microsoft, has equally encouraged marketers to “consume new technology – use it, spend time with it and learn from people it has benefitted”.

Facebook’s mobile app install ad business faces growing competition

Mobile Marketer

While Facebook’s mobile advertising business keeps growing – mobile represented a whopping 62 percent of ad revenue during the second quarter – the social network could become a victim of its own success, particularly on the application marketing front, as a growing number of competitors come out with their own, often compelling offerings.

The 62 percent of ad revenue delivered by mobile in the second quarter is up from 41 percent during the same period a year ago and from 59 percent in the first quarter of 2014. Facebook’s new mobile ad network and app install ads drive much of the mobile ad revenue but the company continues to look at ways to broaden its mobile ad business.

“When you think about our mobile ads, I do sometimes think that people think our mobile app install ads are all of the revenue or a great majority of the revenue, and they are not,” said Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer at Facebook, during a conference call with analyst to discuss the company’s second quarter financial results. “They are only a part of the mobile ads revenues.

“Our mobile ads revenue is broad based,” she said. “We have large brands advertisers, small, direct response advertisers as well as developers using our mobile ads.

“The mobile app install ads which are run not only by developers but also by large companies that want to get people to install apps are growing. They remain a good part of our mobile ads revenue and we are excited about the opportunities there. But we see our opportunities in mobile ads as much broader than just installing apps.”

Mobile growth
Facebook reported yesterday that its overall revenue grew 61 percent for a total of $2.91 billion during the second quarter of 2014. Of that, $2.68 billion came from advertising, a 67 percent jump from the same period a year ago.

Growth in mobile use on Facebook continues to outpace general use, with mobile daily active user increasing 39 percent for a total of 654 million while mobile monthly active users grew 31 percent for a total of 1.07 billion.

In comparison, overall daily active users grew 19 percent for a total of 829 million and monthly active users increased 14 percent for a total of 1.32 billion.

The company also posted a 138 percent increase in net income for a total of $791 million.

App install ads
Facebook launched mobile app install ads in late 2012 and the offering quickly took off because it meet an untapped need to help developers drive app downloads. In less than two years, Facebook has driven 350 million app installs, per Fiksu.

However, Twitter recently released its mobile app promotion product suite. Fiksu is a partner, helping clients such as Groupon, Dunkin Donuts and Barnes & Noble drive app downloads from Twitter.

“Over the past 12 months, Facebook has enjoyed a leadership position with respect to performance in the app marketing space,” Craig Palli, chief strategy officer at Fiksu.

“While costs of media were often up to ten times greater on Facebook than other channels, they could command this premium because their cost per purchasing user was 28 percent better than other traffic sources, based on the strength of their segmentation tools,” he said.

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The 5 biggest myths of modern advertising

Digiday

Industry sage Jeremy Bullmore’s recent takedown of big data, the latest craze to sweep the ad industry, provides exactly the sort of sensible commentary the industry has been lacking of late. As the industry adapts to digital, the scale of the hyperbole too often outweighs the profoundness of the changes in the marketplace.

Taking inspiration from Bullmore, here are five other hyperbolic statements about the future of advertising that need calling out.

1. TV is dead.
More people watch more TV now than ever before, both in the U.S. and U.K., and they watch it more often and for longer; as a result, TV advertising has never been more valuable. Audiences are more thinly scattered, true. People consume TV content on more devices. Despite the doom and gloom about ad-skipping, most are still viewed. TV is here to stay, but we’d be wise to migrate our way of thinking from TV to video. The notion of “television” generates false boundaries to what’s possible with video advertising when you now consume video in so many new ways.

2. Consumers want conversations with brands.
This is a soundbite so good it scatters the slides of presentations around the world, untainted by the inconvenience of not being based on any facts, or observed behavior. We can see a handful of inane comments that respond to a fabric softener’s question on Facebook if people like Fridays, but the conversations I most often see are those of disgruntled customers, given the microphone to complain that Twitter provides. It strikes me overwhelmingly, with remarkably few exceptions, that for most brands, people want an outcome or resolution, or perhaps information and not a conversation.

3. Brands must create great content
Content marketing is not the answer to all brands’ problems. I don’t look for a beer brand to do a better job of finding me a good bar to go to, or a coffee brand to entertain me. We live in an age with endless, incredible content, where our phones give us access to everything ever made, at any moment in time, normally for free. Brands must find a voice in a world where people are looking to reduce distractions, not seek even more entertainment.

Yes, content must provide value and it should be well made — but it’s not as simple as that. Successful content is likely to be highly personal, distributed well using social connections, and be time- and context-dependent. Branded content is not meritocratic — you can’t say any one piece of content is “better” than another. Perhaps the real test of content is when it’s served, how, who it reaches and what value that provides.

4. Advertising is about storytelling.
Advertising types are wonderful salespeople — so much so, that we’ve bought our own lies. It’s lovely to think of brands as storytellers, and for some brands in some markets this is possible. But let’s not delude ourselves that advertising is not about selling stuff.

5. Advertising spend should be correlated with consumers’ time spent with media.
As an industry, we are obsessed with reaching people wherever they are, but we’ve never used empathy to establish how appropriate that moment is. As the world evolves to spend more time on mobile and online, we’ve assumed the money must follow. Media spend projections for the future bear no resemblance to what seems to be working or not working, and how it’s even possible to spend this much money in these channels.

Things are changing, but we need nuance and wisdom. While nobody gets famous or a promotion saying things are complex or largely unchanged, it’s closer to the truth.

Why digital publishers want to be in the magazine business

Digiday

There’s a lot of positive talk about magazines these days — but, interestingly, it’s coming from the digital likes of Yahoo, Say Media and Flipboard.

Backwards as it may sound, online “magazines” have become core to Yahoo’s strategy to make the site a regular destination for people. Along those lines, CEO Marissa Mayer has been introducing several verticals in topics including travel, food, beauty and health — all typically the domain of glossy magazines.

Yahoo is not alone. Say Media, parent of xojane and ReadWrite; First Look, the new media company created by Pierre Omidyar; and Flipboard all similarly describe their digital products as magazines. And it’s not just an exercise in semantics: They’ve been hiring journalists who have serious print bona fides. Yahoo’s spate of recent hires has included New York Times’ David Pogue, Bon Appétit’s Julie Bainbridge and Joe Zee from Elle.

Yahoo and Say Media have also been rolling out highly visual and elaborate (read: premium-priced) ads. By using the very term “magazines,” Say is trying to remind advertisers that these are high-quality, editor-driven products with real audiences, not just listicles, in the hopes that it will translate into revenue.

“The term magazine describes the value advertisers are getting,” said Joyce Bautista Ferrari, executive editorial director at Say Media (and, worth noting, a former longtime Condé Nast magazine journalist). “They’re getting storytelling, something that has a personality.”

It makes sense. Look at the rates of magazines compared to online ads. A single page in a glossy magazine could be discounted by more than half its open rate and still get an effective CPM of about $70. Online display ad CPMs average under $3, according to Nomura Securities via eMarketer, and even less for programmatic.

“Outside of those very premium spots, everything is highly negotiable,” said Steve Minichini, director of digital media and innovation at Assembly. “Especially with programmatic — all bets are off. It’s very different from the print space, where there’s legacy pricing.”

Print magazines, meanwhile, are everything online publishers want — they stand for something with their audiences, they have established rates based on a long tradition of buying and selling. The publisher can artificially limit supply by cutting pages.

And the magazine-reading experience is different. Magazines may be losing importance as more readers shift online, but they’re still the ultimate engagement vehicle. Research has shown that people are more focused when reading print than when listening to radio or watching TV.

Meanwhile, online publishing is heading for trouble. Desktop ad spending is flattening out and projected to decline as consumers shift to mobiles, but ad spending on mobile hasn’t kept up with the amount of time people spend on the devices. Yahoo’s ad business is struggling, as it revealed in its second-quarter earnings call, which is why it’s rolling out new premium products for its digital magazines.

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Technology journalists are facing extinction

Medium

One of the first ever online journalists for the BBC is a close colleague of mine. These days, you’d say he was the most experienced member of the team.

But back in the 90s, when the BBC was still finding itself online, it was decided that his job would be “internet correspondent”.

Internet correspondent! The very notion that one such role could encapsulate all that was going on in this brave new world now seems hideously naive — but I’m told at the time it was met with the odd scoff in the newsroom.

“Can you believe it?” they’d chatter, “they’ve got someone who’s just looking at the internet!”

Fast forward a few more years, to 2005, and another colleague of mine found himself in a similar situation. Tasked with chipping in with the BBC’s live election coverage, his role was to give a run-down on what chatter was taking place online.

It was given a fairly short shrift — it really was all meaningless waffle, back then. The hardened hacks shared the same opinion — who cared about what some idiots on the internet had to say?

Of course, the next general election had no such role (Edit 16/07/14: see update at the foot of this post). This time, diligent political hacks— spearheaded by the likes of Laura Kuenssberg —were all across the internet themselves.

Tweeting, blogging, Facebooking… politics wasn’t just talked about on the internet, it happened there.

Most of my day-to-day work is for the BBC News website, but in the past 12 months I’ve been lucky enough to get my shot at TV and radio.

Yet while my personal capacity to tell technology stories in the past year has diversified, I’ve noticed something: my beat is rapidly disappearing.

We don’t need someone “watching the internet” during elections anymore, that’s clear. But we’re also now approaching a point where the most pressing — and let’s face it, interesting — technology stories shouldn’t be thought of as technology stories at all.

Case in point: the Edward Snowden revelations. A story broken, not by a technology writer, but by a civil rights specialist with a background in law.

Which makes a lot of sense. Snowden is a story about democracy, a political crisis, a threat to our human rights. It’s a debate about civil liberties, what it means to be “safe” from terrorism, and the ethics of whistleblowing.

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Events can help media companies balance uneven revenue streams

INMA

When we discuss the direction of the news media industry revenue streams on either a macro or micro level, two predominant revenue streams head to the top of the charts. Traditional print still is king at most news media companies, with online/mobile building momentum in most corners of the globe.

While both of those are and will remain critical to our long-term survival, let me offer a potential third leg of that three-legged revenue stool we all seek: events.

News media companies have dabbled in the events arena for quite some time, but with limited success because they often focus on events not destined to create any significant financial windfall. Cooking shows, for example. Or community events such as runs, concerts, and so forth, which are great for local support and exposure, but offer little in the way of significant financial return.

The return on investment falls far short of what the industry has grown to expect from print and even online ventures. And so the full value and revenue potential of event sponsorship for media companies has become clouded and jaded.

But there is money to be made from events, when handled the right way.

Most event experts say two of the largest expenses are the cost of a venue, and event marketing — two areas media companies excel in. They are well-positioned to pull off their own events and eliminate much of the traditional cost associated with these events, due to their expertise in the above key areas.

Marathons and half-marathons as well as triathlons have been known to make tens of thousands of dollars in profits. Concerts and motivational speakers can do the same. Home shows, garden shows, outdoor shows, fishing or golf tournaments — all still can rake in dollars in a big way.

Bear in mind, every one of these events that enters your market without your involvement does, in fact, impact your bottom line. They can extract valuable dollars from potential advertisers, customers, etc. All of those dollars will no longer be circulating throughout your community.

Factor in the compounding value of a dollar either entering or leaving your community and the impact is significant. For every dollar that leaves your community, you can compound that into five or six dollars subtracted from the community.

You can bet some of those are out of your revenue streams.

Much like a stool that needs three or four legs upon which to stand in a balanced fashion, media companies need more than two revenue legs on which to balance their long-term survival.

Embracing events can add a third leg to the revenue mix (or stool) with little risk and a great upside. You don’t need to hire all new staff; you can dabble in the event arena with the employees you currently have and see how the operation goes.

The key with events, just as with print and/or online and mobile, is to have someone passionate about growing that segment of the balance sheet. It won’t happen by itself. It doesn’t take a whole team of passionate employees. All you need is one employee who is motivated financially and the magic begins.

You won’t be alone. Other media companies are starting to find the magic of events — and turning it into significant revenues in short order.

Pinterest’s interest-following feature could be advertising gold mine

Digiday

Pinterest today made it that much easier for consumers to explore specific interests, and agency execs are already looking toward its potential advertising uses.

Previously, Pinterest curated pins around broad categories such as “outdoors.” Now, when users click on “Outdoors,” they’ll be able to find pins curated to interests as narrow as “ultralight backpacking” and “saltwater fishing.”

Pinterest is in the midst of introducing ads to its platform, but a Pinterest spokesperson said there are no immediate plans to allow advertisers to target users based upon the interest pages they chose to follow. But this being a platform whose only revenue source is advertising, it’s fair to assume that, if interest pages catch on with users, ads will be sold against them.

At least agency execs, always looking to target consumers based upon their interests, hope so.

“All we’re trying to do is go deeper based upon targeting people on interest. The ability to hit them in that context makes a lot of sense,” Jordan Bitterman, chief strategy officer at media agency Mindshare, said.

Pinterest’s 32 categories — such “travel,” “animals” and “kids” — were too broad to serve finely tuned ads, according to Jill Sherman, group director of social and content strategy at Digitas. Agency execs routinely describe Pinterest image as a visual search engine. Adding interest collections — essentially more-nuanced tags – can only enrich that database.

“It was basically a collection of boards. Now it’s much more: a very deep directory of interest,” Chris Bowler, Razorfish’s global vice president of social media, said.

Interest pages are also a way for Pinterest to broaden its appeal, or at the very least, prevent it from losing users. Pinterest’s user-base still skews female despite its incredible popularity, Providing more pinpointed collections could attract even more users.

“This is where the entire social world is going; niche communities that have much higher receptivity than your broad-based Facebook and Twitter platforms,” Chris Bowler, Razorfish’s global vice president of social media, said. “This is Pinterest’s way of serving a community of rock climbers versus someone creating another online community around rock climbing.”

Bitterman added that the tool would also likely increase the amount of time Pinterest users stay on the platform in a given session, another selling point for Pinterest as it ramps up ad selling efforts. The prediction speaks to the power of catering to people’s interests: it makes Pinterest more appealing to consumers, and more alluring to ad buyers.

Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

VentureBeat

Advertisers on Facebook see the emerging method of sequential mobile advertising as a way to better control their branding message with consumers on social media.

Sequential video advertising allows marketers to place targeted video ads in front of a user when they click an ad on their mobile device. Based on what the person clicks, and what the product or message is, marketers are then able to follow up with similar video ads as they hop from one device to another.

By creating a sequence of targeted ads, marketers can build up a pitch from one video to the next — starting with a “pitch” video and ending with a “sell” video intended to close the sale.

VentureBeat spoke to two sources who requested their names not be used because the information they were describing was based in conversations with Facebook executives.

“Video is where its going,” an advertising executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat. “With unique profile IDs, you have the ability to better sequentially target content for users as they embark on their journey through the social media funnel.”

The same executive added: “Sequential video advertisers gives marketers the ability to place different messages that can build upon each other. This gives you greater control over the delivery of your message.”

Another mobile executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat that advertisers want to better control, and deploy, product messages. But they are content, for now, in permitting Facebook and others obtain user data to target their ads.

For its part, Facebook uses a combination of its own in-house analytics and partners for the task of ad targeting.

Facebook is able to amass tremendous amounts of user data based on information contained in in its users’ profiles as well as their activity. That includes information on who you interact with and where you like to shop, for example. That data is gold to advertisers, keen to take advantage of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users.

“The writing is on the wall. Sequentially targeted ads are hugely efficient and ultimately cost effective. They have greater relevance for advertisers and better targeting,” said the second source, who has knowledge of Facebook’s mobile ad strategy.

“Anecdotally, it’s very promising. Facebook is putting a lot of effort into it,” the same source added.

Indeed, Facebook bought the video advertising outfit Liverail for an undisclosed sum earlier this month. Liverail’s technology optimizes video ad deliveries for mobile devices utilizing bidding and proprietary data. Liverail was considering an IPO this year but threw in its lot with Facebook instead, media reports said.

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You’re not hallucinating: Ads are getting more intrusive

Digiday

If you think you’re seeing more big, noisy ads cluttering your Web-surfing experience, you’re right. Intrusive ads are on the rise.

The top 10 publishers of so-called “high-impact” ads published 8,989 in all of 2013, according to data Digiday pulled from Moat Pro, a service of ad analytics firm Moat. For the first six months of 2014, publishers ran 4,971 high-impact ads, putting them on track to be 11 percent ahead of 2013.

Moat Pro divides high-impact ads into 11 types, including skins, overlays, interstitials and pushdowns. You know them when you see them, like with this Wall Street Journal home page takeover:

 You’re not hallucinating: Ads are getting more intrusive

High-impact ads are mostly concentrated on sports sites, which are noisy environments to begin with. But many premium publisher sites also are showing significant increases.

It’s not hard to see why. Advertisers are looking to get people to notice their ads in a cluttered media environment and ultimately induce them to buy. The revelation that half of online ads are going unseen has raised the stakes for advertisers, who are now demanding that publishers prove that their ads are being seen for a minimum amount of time. At the same time, big, high-impact units are a panacea for publishers desperate to prop up falling online ad rates.

USA Today publisher Larry Kramer has been pushing high-impact ads on USAToday.com as part of a deliberate strategy to preserve high online CPMs. At the same time, he scaled back the number of ad positions available on USAToday.com and focused the high-impact ads on the home page so people will see them but the interruption is short-lived. Plus, he said, people have come to expect these kinds of ads online, just as they expect to see TV ads.

“It’s the least disruptive place to do it, and it’s not unexpected,” he said. For advertisers, high-impact ads give them a bigger space for their message and are ideal for introducing a new product or service.

At the same time, there’s been a backlash to traditional display ads. The native ad trend has been predicated on the idea that people aren’t paying attention to banners anymore and that people are more likely to respond favorably to ads that mimic the look and feel of the editorial. Some publishers like BuzzFeed and Gawker have aspired to all but end their reliance on display ads altogether and only run native ads.

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