Advertising & Marketing Events
Event Date Location

2015 International CES

01/06/2015 - 01/09/2015 Las Vegas Nevada

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Marketing News Roundup: Facebook News Feed, Personalisation & Email Still the Most Effective Tactic

IDG Connect 0811 Marketing News Roundup: Facebook News Feed, Personalisation & Email Still the Most Effective Tactic

These are my top pick of marketing stories from the last week. I will be focusing Facebook’s update to its news feed, what data marketers use for personalisation and email marketing still the most effective digital marketing tactic.

Update to Facebook News Feed

Facebook has announced that it will be making changes to its news feed so users will see less promotional content. Mentioned in a recent blog post, the company is responding to a survey it held of users. The findings found that Facebook users view the news feed too promotional with a lack of context. And with Facebook’s declining popularity it’s important for the company to listen to its users.

But what does this mean for business page advertising? By eliminating the advertising from its news feed, advertisements will just appear on right column of any page on the site and in the right column on the sites search results. In its blog, Facebook says that Pages will still be important as ever. It also plans to increase its investment in Pages by building new features such as messaging, customised industry pages and video and photo content.

Marketers Use Personal Data for Personalisation

Personalisation is becoming a popular topic amongst marketers. As vast amounts of content is being continuously produced, marketers have begun to see the need to personalise. Over five in 10 marketers agree that the ability to personalise content is a fundamental to their online strategy according to Econsultancy’s recent report.

The report found that 65% of marketers are using personal data such as name, gender and location to personalise their web experiences. Which isn’t surprising as this is the most common personalisation seen across web content. Other forms of personalisation marketers are beginning to adopt is user preferences (45%) and purchase history (38%).

The report also discovered which personalisation has the most impact on ROI. This showed that while personal data is the most commonly used personalisation, 70% of respondents find purchase history has had the biggest impact on ROI.

This demonstrates that while marketers are using the common types of personalised content this always doesn’t mean it’s the best. It could be considered that consumers expect basic personalisation from their web experiences but its marketing’s job to enhance the experience by offering additional personalisation.

Check out our recent top tips blog post to help create an effective personalised marketing campaign.

Email is Still the Most Effective Type of Digital Marketing

While there has been many digital marketing tactics added to marketing’s tool belt, email is still seen as the most effective digital marketing type. In fact, 54% of marketers see its effectiveness in Ascend2 recent digital marketing strategy report

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IDG TechNetwork Expands Programmatic Media Buying Into China

MediaPost

The IDG TechNetwork has expanded its global online advertising network into China, following its parent company International Data Group (IDG), which has supported the market for 34 years.

The launch of IDG TechNetwork China, announced Monday, means that IDG now supports data-driven marketing and premium programmatic buying to more than 60 Chinese language magazines, newspapers and Web sites.

Peter Longo, CEO of U.S. Media for IDG Communications, believes the move makes the company the first global technology-focused ad network to enter the Chinese market. The network supports more than 570 publisher sites and reaches more than 130 million tech enthusiasts, enterprise tech buyers and gamers.

Based in Beijing, IDG TechNetwork China is a fully owned business unit of IDG China led by CEO William Xu.

For brands, the move means an easier transition into China to reach the local market and better access to premium inventory they can purchase and optimize through one media group, the IDG TechNetwork China.

Marketers will have access to auctions and private marketplaces, data management platform and demand side platform services, along with increased targeting capabilities and multiple ways of acquiring inventory through direct placements and exchange based trading, per Longo.

“They will be able to buy with confidence against premium inventory from IDG, a media company that has been doing business in China for over 30 years,” he said.

All owned-and-operated Web sites in China become part of the IDG TechNetwork China along with selected premium partners that we have chosen to work with us. This provides increased scale to offer their advertising partners, as well as the ability to do business with new partners, such as DSPs and agency trading desks.

The company will now collect first-party data for its network of Web sites, allowing for better performance and return on investments for advertisers.

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China Interview: Insight for Western Marketers

IDG Connect 0811 China Interview: Insight for Western Marketers

As the Alibaba IPO has reminded international businesses afresh of the vast potential in China, we catch up with Tait Lawton, who hails from Canada but has been working in People’s Republic for over a decade. He founded the Nanjing Marketing Group  to help Western companies get into the marketplace and now provides some useful insights for marketers worldwide.

Following the highly publicized Alibaba IPO have you noticed an increase in Western clients looking to target China?

We’ve noticed a steady increase overall, but not a large jump around the Alibaba IPO necessarily. Tough to say.

Has the attitude of Western clients looking to target China changed in the time you have been based there?

I’ve been helping Western clients with Chinese marketing for five years. I’d say they have the same basic concerns, but are more willing to accept our advice when it comes to tailoring their campaign more to the Chinese market.

We prefer to plan the China marketing campaign anew from the ground up as opposed to using more of a one-size-fits-all globalization strategy, and more people are willing to accept this now. Tough to say if it’s because of a change in the overall mind set of Western marketers or it’s just because we have more people that have been reading our articles on our blog and other websites.

How does the way Chinese consumers use technology differ from the way technology is used in your native Canada?

They haven’t gone through the same process of adoption. Since China developed so quickly, lots of people in China have just skipped whole stages of technology that Canadians, Americans and other Westerners are used to. For example, some years ago I was surprised to see that my girlfriend’s family never used a VCR and instead just went straight to using DVDs. Now, of course, people may be skipping VCRs, DVDs and even streaming on laptops and just go straight to streaming on mobile devices.

What’s most relevant for our digital marketing efforts is that there are plenty of internet users that started using the internet on mobile devices. Mobile marketing is essential. Sometimes people ask me “do you do mobile marketing?”, and I’m like “well, ya. 100% of the marketing we do is relevant to mobile. All of our SEM, SEO and social media services are relevant to mobile.”

People in China also use QR codes a lot. You’ll see QR codes for Weibo and WeChat campaigns on subway ads, restaurant menus, everywhere.

What do you think Western businesses most misunderstand about China?

For one, they may underestimate the competition and the amount they should invest to be successful. China is very competitive and for most market entry cases we see, there are Chinese competitors that are entrenched and willing to invest much much more than the foreign company planning to enter China. Chinese companies are very confident in their business opportunities and willing to invest in branding.

And Chinese advertising is not cheap, nor is marketing talent. Great Chinese marketers can make as much money as great marketers in USA or other places.

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Snapchat rolls out non-‘creepy’ ads that still might get creepy

ComputerWorld

Ads are officially coming to Snapchat, in a form the company says is not “targeted,” but Snapchat’s own terms of service suggest it could do something very much like that.

The first ad will appear this weekend in the U.S., in the “recent updates” section of the app. That means it won’t be pushed to users like a personal message, and users can choose whether to open it or not. It will disappear after it is viewed or within 24 hours, the same way the “Stories” feature works, the company said Friday in a blog post.

The company did not say who the first advertiser would be, and a spokeswoman declined to comment further.

How Snapchat will determine which ads to show users is not clear. The company said its ads would not be “creepy” or “targeted,” probably an allusion to Facebook or Google. However, the best ads should promote “stuff that actually interests you,” Snapchat said in its announcement.

The spokeswoman declined to comment on whether the company will use any information about users to choose ads for them. But Snapchat does have a decent pot of data on some users that might be employed for targeting ads, even if the company doesn’t like the word “targeted.” According to its own terms of service, with users’ consent, Snapchat may collect users’ location data and information collected by cookie files and other tracking technologies.

Read on…

IDG’s Social Media Marketing Success Story

Media Shepard

IDG worked with Samsung late last year to promote the company’s 10.1 Galaxy Note tablet. For Samsung, the goals were clear: promote the product during the holiday season in order to reach the campaign’s target business audience. IDG’s job was to leverage its industry contacts and brand following to create awareness and engagement.

That job fell to Colin Browning, marketing services director at IDG, who heads the Performance Marketing group within IDG Strategic Marketing Services. Browning’s team is responsible for the implementation, management, analysis, and optimization of social media and lead generation programs for clients.

mediaShepherd asked Browning to explain how IDG designed and implemented an effective B2B social media campaign: platforms used, specific approaches, goals, strategies and results.

mediaShepherd: What were the goals of the campaign? How were you defining “success” both for your client and IDG?

Colin Browning: The overall campaign goal was to increase the IT leadership’s awareness of Samsung’s new 10.1 inch tablet as a superior device for use in the workplace. For the social component we wanted to get the target audience discussing the broader advantages and flexibility of tablets while including Samsung’s messaging.

mS: There is often a fine line between promotional and valuable content, especially with custom marketing campaigns. How did you ensure that you would be pushing out valuable content to your audiences to facilitate real engagement? (Did the survey(s) you conducted play a role in this?)

CB: The program content, including the Twitter chat topics, were designed to be thought leadership based. While these are all informative pieces and conversations, they were also aligned to the key value propositions of the Samsung Tablet. This enabled us to have broader audience conversations about the use of the tablet in the workplace and what IT’s needs are, without coming across as overly promotional.

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Can This Advertising Innovation at “The New York Times” Save Sinking Ad Revenue?

Remember when newspaper print ads were practically a cultural institution? Stroll to the end of the driveway on a Sunday morning for that several-pounder edition and pore through the articles and the ads. Scan the sales at Macy’s, look for a new job, find a matinee time, decide which store has the best price on rib eyes — the Sunday tome was practically the gateway to the world. Then the Internet relentlessly and almost instantaneously stole print advertising’s relevance, leaving publishers searching for new ways to connect with readers and, just as important, generate revenue.

The New York Times Co. (NYSE: NYT  ) may have finally found that cup-of-coffee-worthy formula for advertising, infusing its smart editorial style into content that resonates with an advertiser’s audience in a way that preserves its integrity as a news source.

It’s been a long road back
It’s safe to say that the heyday of traditional newspaper advertising is over, but looking back at what once worked it seems there are a few ingredients for success: The advertising must be compelling and relevant enough to get consumers to spend time with it. But it must also fit its platform — that is, not compromise the spirit, tone and even journalistic mandate of its publication.

The Times recognized the need for innovation early, building one of the smartest and most clickable Internet portals for its flagship newspaper. Like many of its contemporaries, the company has replaced some lost ad revenue with digital advertising, but not nearly enough. It seemed something was missing. Across the Web, digital ad sales climbed dramatically in recent years, but stayed fairly flat at newspapers. Though moderately successful, banner and display ads and pieces from the ad exchanges never found a comfortable seat in the traditional news format. Ad perusers had plenty of other choices, after all, and consumers had left behind the notion of the newspaper as a place to shop.

 

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New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

This in spite of tech marketing turmoil and transformation, as half of tech companies replaced CMO in last 24 months

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. – The 12th Annual Tech Marketing Benchmark Study from the International Data Corporation (IDCCMO Advisory Service finds that marketing budgets among the 101 technology companies surveyed will increase by an average of 3.5% in 2014. Those same companies expect a revenue increase of 3.7% for the same period. Despite this momentum, the CMO role remains very fluid as marketing organizations attempt to reinvent their capabilities and effectiveness in a new era of marketing. In a related study, IDC finds that 51% of tech CMO’s have been in their position for fewer than two years.

Two-thirds of the companies surveyed by IDC will increase their marketing budgets in 2014 while only 20% of the companies will decrease their marketing budgets with the remainder indicating no change in budget levels. Notably, companies with a high percentage of 3rd Platform products (cloud, social, mobile and Big Data and analytics) will receive marketing budget increases upwards of five times that of the average tech company, increasing their budgets 10-20% year over year.

“For the first time in eight years, IDC is seeing that marketing budgets are increasing at about the same rate as revenues. This is positive news for tech marketers and also a clear indication that the C-suite is ready to put additional marketing investment up against more promising business prospects,” saidSam Melnick, Senior Research Analyst, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, both the CMO and CEO must understand that momentum is being driven by success in 3rd Platform solution areas. To continue this growth, executives must continue to invest to be competitive in these high-upside segments.”

“We examined 152 tech companies with a current CMO in place and found that 77, just over half, have replaced their CMO in the last 24 months – an astonishing rate of change. CMOs must own the digital disruption of buyer experience for their companies. Those CMOs able to rise to the challenge will be provided more resources and given more power. The unprepared will be replaced,” said Kathleen Schaub, Vice President, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, tech CEOs must also wake up to the impact marketing now wields over revenue and reputation. It’s their job to pick the right person for today’s challenges. To get CMO selection right means the CEO needs to understand and get closer to marketing.”

The 12th annual 2014 Tech Marketing Benchmark Study was recently completed by IDC’s CMO Advisory Service and seeks to capture the full marketing spend and marketing headcount allocations of global companies within the technology sector. The research effort surveyed 101 companies, with the average company’s revenue surpassing $7 billion. IDC’s 2015 Marketing Investment Planner containing study details will be published in November and will be available on IDC.com. In a parallel study, the CMO Advisory Service studied 152 tech companies ranging from $50 million to $100 billion in revenue to observe their CMO tenure.

About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and business strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. In 2014, IDC celebrates its 50th anniversary of providing strategic insights to help clients achieve their key business objectives. IDC is a subsidiary of IDG, the world’s leading technology media, research, and events company. You can learn more about IDC by visiting www.idc.com. Follow IDC on Twitter at @IDC.

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British marketers’ relevant mobile ads are well received: report

Mobile Marketer
As marketers in Britain continue to move away from broadly targeted mobile ad campaigns, consumers say they are more likely to find ads informative and helpful compared to last year, according to a new report from xAd and Telmetrics. 
 
The second annual UK Mobile Path-to-Purchase Study found that consumers are 76 percent more likely to find mobile ads informative and helpful than last year. Additionally, one-third of respondents reported clicking on at least one mobile ad in the last 30 days. 
 
“The big news is that consumers are really starting to becoming more open to advertising on their mobile devices,” said Sarah Ohle, director of marketing intelligence at xAd, New York. “Positive associations with mobile ads have risen 76 percent since this study was initially run in 2013.
“This is largely driven by the value that mobile ads are now delivering to consumers,” she said. “Value can really be anything from free content to time savings to locally relevant messages.
“This improved level of acceptance ultimately results in greater influence over a brand’s target audiences – and ultimately an increase in its bottom line.”
Of interest
The study reviewed what 2,000 consumers in Britain are doing via smartphones and tablets, capturing preferences and behaviors. 
Key findings include that one in three respondents reported they clicked on an ad because it was something they were interested in or looking for.

UK internet users ‘tolerate’ ads

Warc

Nearly all (98%) internet users in the UK would not be willing to pay the estimated £140 that it would cost each of them if the internet was not supported by digital advertising, new research has revealed.

In a survey that also found high levels of ad avoidance, video ad platform Ebuzzing based its estimate on a division of the UK’s digital adspend in 2013 (£6.4bn) by the number of UK internet users (45m), the Telegraph reported.

Based on the responses of 1,400 UK consumers, the study concluded that they are prepared to accept ads to avoid paying an extra £140, which is roughly equivalent to the compulsory BBC licence fee.

But that does not mean UK consumers warm to ads as they use the internet, Ebuzzing warned.

It found nearly two-thirds (63%) skip video ads “as quickly as possible”, which rises to 75% among 16-24 year olds, and 16% of all internet users employ ad blocking software.

Furthermore, over a quarter of all respondents said they mute their sound and one-in-five scroll away from a video, leading Ebuzzing to warn advertisers that they need to improve their formats.

“It’s clear the ad industry has a major role to play in keeping web content free, but we have to respond to what consumers are telling us,” said Jeremy Arditi, UK managing director at Ebuzzing.

“We need to get better at engaging, not better at interrupting,” he added. “That means introducing new formats which consumers find less invasive, more creative ads that are better placed, and giving consumers a degree of choice and control.”

More positively, the report also found that just over a third (34%) of respondents would be more likely to watch online video ads if they are personally relevant while one-in-five are open to “being able to select the ad I watch”.