Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

FLURRY : SOURCE14

04/22/2014 San Francisco CA

Game Marketing Summit

04/23/2014 San Francisco CA

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

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News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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5 challenges of big data

Marketing Interactive

In a recent study by the World Federation of Advertisers on the contentious subject of big data, top marketers have highlighted some of their biggest challenges. Whilst 88% of the respondents said it was vital for current and future business decision-making, 54% struggle to cope with the huge volume of data being generated.  (See the infographic below)The other 4 challenges include:

  • To deploy insights practically across the business (49%)
  • To find business analysts and data scientists with the right skills (49%)
  • Unprepared to take advantage of the opportunities of big data (74%)
  • Improved understanding of ROI as their primary reason for investing in this area (70%)

The study is based on on responses from 47 different multinational brands, collectively responsible for USD35 billion in marketing spend each year. Conducted in conjunction with The Customer Framework, the survey revealed that big data efforts work best when three key conditions are met:

  • The company has a clarity of purpose around its big data efforts

The most successful respondents were those who identified a clear purpose to their exploration of big data. Nearly 61% claimed to have a clear definition of the purpose of big data. Because every company has access to a multitude of different data sources of varying quality and ownership, the absence of a ‘purpose’ or hypothesis can lead to wasted investment, the WFA said.

  • The company ignores the hype around big data and starts small 

Starting work with small data sets can enable marketers to more easily meet with success in identify insights that can be applied across the business. This helps to demonstrate that it’s worth investing more in the right people and tools. It also allows marketers to boost their expertise and enable them to ensure that work on larger and more disparate data sets truly generates better commercial insights.

Click to continue reading and view infographic 

How Nielsen’s OCR Will Impact Digital Video Advertising

MediaPost

For decades, the gross rating point (GRP) metric has been used in television advertising to calculate campaign exposure with respect to reach and frequency against a target demographic audience. GRPs are  now available for digital video advertising through Nielsen online campaign ratings (OCR). The ad industry had been pushing for the ability to compare TV buys to digital video — and it’s finally arrived, opening the door to a new kind of conversation between TV and digital buyers.

Digital buyers need to prepare for this before it happens. They have an opportunity to evaluate digital video advertising through the lens of a TV buyer before it’s forced on them. If there’s ever a time to be proactive about something, it’s now. Here’s how a digital buyer can be proactive with respect to GRP measurement:

First, recognize that the only impressions that matter to a TV buyer are those that reach the target demographic. For example, if the on-target demo is men ages 18-34, any impressions that reach anyone outside this demo will be considered wasted impressions. So, evaluating a digital buy on TV standards means considering off-target impressions as waste.

Second, develop an in-depth understanding of how well the digital video impressions bought for a campaign match the campaign’s on-target demo. It would be easy here to assume that, thanks to audience buying, a digital video buy would have very low levels of off-target waste. However, when Nielsen OCR is used to evaluate the on-target percent of a digital buy, it’s using different data than any third-party demographic data used for audience buying today. Digital buyers will want to understand the discrepancies between the targeting they’ve been using and the on-target percent evaluation that’s built into OCR.

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What will social media’s giants look like in 5 or 10 years?

CNNMoney

Imagine a future where you’ll be able to physically reach out to poke your Facebook friends (gross), where tweets are the de facto mode of communication for large-scale emergencies (cool), and where people log into Google Plus for more than just wondering, “Are people using Google Plus yet?” (Okay, okay, we couldn’t help ourselves with that one — but really, we actually are, so put us in your circles already.)

If those scenarios seem far-fetched, perhaps you’re thinking too near-term. Whether it’s through major acquisitions or seemingly minor service enhancements, the major social networks are making changes to their products on a weekly, daily, even hourly basis. Fortune asked a few experts to daydream about where these networks might be five and 10 years down the line. Their responses were surprisingly realistic.

Facebook

Breaking the biggest news of the month, if not the year, Facebook (FB) set the social scene ablaze with its March 25 acquisition of Oculus VR, valued at approximately $2 billion. A sharp turn in Facebook’s product road map, the purchase has pundits imagining all sorts of crossovers for the social network and virtual reality technology.

“The Oculus purchase further shows how Facebook will be obsessed with staying relevant by buying the next big thing,” says Paul Berry, founder and CEO of New York City-based social publishing platform RebelMouse. Through this and other acquisitions, Berry thinks Facebook will become a brand-holding company in the future, similar to Viacom or Hearst. “I see them, better than anyone else, using their market capitalization to create even bigger market cap for the Instagrams or WhatsApps,” he says.

But internally, Facebook may split over dueling objectives, says Michael Jones, CTO of Portland, Ore.-based Little Bird, a company that provides social influencer analytics and research. ”[Facebook] used to be a lot more fun and idealistic, and now that they’re public, there is extreme pressure upon that organization to grow up quickly and to monetize,” he says. This “great divide” will continue on for years, as half of the company drives toward generating revenue while the rest pursues the founding ideals of authentic engagement and connecting the world.

Continue reading…

Jonny Evans: Wearable computing means the death of the smartphone

Computerworld

Wearables are the next big thing, analysts and industry watchers say. But are they right?

Take your pick of hyperbolic predictions: BCC Research forecasts that the wearables sector will grow to $30.2 billion by 2018; ABI Research anticipates that 485 million wearables will be sold annually by 2018.

That sounds incredibly positive, but BCC analyst Adam Weigold warns that in order for the industry to hit his firm’s prediction, customers will have to feel that wearable devices offer “distinct advantages.”

There’s the rub. Wearables must be innately useful. They must deliver essential functions. Their existence needs to make sense. They have to supplant alternatives. In other words, these things can’t be gimmicks.

At the same time, they have to work as fashion, something the tech industry has no experience in.Intel anthropologist Genevieve Bell told Stuff thatexisting wearables are “terribly literal” and lack “symbolic meaning.” That’s important, she said, since in general the things people wear “do symbolic work.”

And while wearable computing devices must function as fashion accessories, it’s a mistake to make them technology accessories. Not a fatal mistake — there’s a strong accessories market. But to really snag mass-market adoption, wearables need to be essential and work as stand-alones.

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Programmatic Is Eating the (Advertising) World

Re/code

In 2011, renowned entrepreneur and investor Marc Andreessen famously wrote, “Software is eating the world.” Now, in 2014, I would argue that “programmatic” is eating the world. The world of advertising, that is.

For readers unfamiliar with the concept, programmatic — or programmatic advertising — generally refers to an automated, technology-driven method of selling and buying digital advertising that is used to automate either the transaction itself (for example, real-time bidding), the workflow behind this process, or a combination of the two.

It was only about a year ago that Forbes published an article titled “What Is Programmatic Advertising and Is It the Future?” Now, programmatic is definitely the present, with eMarketer predicting that programmatic advertising will grow from less than $5 billion worldwide in 2011 to more than $32 billion by 2017.

You may balk at such a forecast, but if you think that the reach of digital advertising is limited to devices like cellphones, computers and televisions, you need only look out the window of PubMatic’s New York City office onto Times Square to be reminded that this is not necessarily the case. Each time I visit, it seems as though more of the billboard ads have been converted to digital displays — and digital almost always opens the door for programmatic.

With more and more traditional media making the leap to digital, the opportunities for programmatic will only continue to grow. Case in point: Programmatic radio advertising. As music consumption increasingly goes digital, from radio broadcasts over the Internet to digital services like iTunes Radio, Spotify and ClearChannel’s iHeartRadio, all of the audio and visual ad spots that are created are being bought and sold programmatically.

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Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

Quartz

 Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

The above chart comes from data released by SNL Kagan earlier this month. It highlights the fact that, despite all of the ink spilt in recent years bemoaning the internet driven demise of traditional media, such businesses remain very, very profitable.

The most profitable “old media” business in America last year was John Malone’s Liberty Media, which among other assets, owns the Atlanta Braves major league baseball franchise; 26% of America’s fourth-largest cable provider, Charter Communications; and 27% of concert promoter Live Nation. (Although it’s worth pointing out the company enjoyed a one-off accounting gain worth $7.5 billion, after it changed the way it treats an investment in satellite radio operator Sirius XM on its books).

There’s a common thread between the rest of the top five (and at least half of the list): they produce and sell television shows and/or movies. 21st Century Fox is the company behind the eponymous network, cable channels (like Fox News) and Hollywood film studios; Disney makes nearly half of its revenue out of its media networks division, which includes the juggernaut that is ESPN;  Time Warner owns HBO and CNN among other businesses ; Viacom is the company behind MTV, Nickelodeon and the Paramount line of film studios.

It is also worth pointing out that Google, by many definitions a media business (it makes most of its money out of search advertising) is more profitable than any company on the list. But among internet media  (or so-called “new media”) businesses, it’s the glaring exception.

 Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

All the same, internet companies like Facebook (net income was up 4,600% in 2013) and Netflix (up 555%) are growing at a rapid pace. So it might not be that long before they are among the biggest media businesses—however you choose to define one—as well.

Paywalls open doors

The Economist

PIANO MEDIA began as a simple idea based on the business model of television cable subscriptions. The thinking went that if people were willing to pay a single fee to access a bundle of TV channels, perhaps they would do the same for online media. The logic behind the Slovak firm has recently proved itself commercially sound: Piano Media announced a deal earlier this month with Newsweek, the re-launched American magazine.

Piano Media was created three years ago amid widespread doubt that customers would ever pay for online content. Nevertheless, the firm began by constructing a paywall system that encompassed most leading media in Slovakia.

With just 5m people and a unique language, Slovakia made a convenient test case. By accumulating a critical mass in a linguistically closed market, Piano Media and online publishers were able to drive subscriptions. In this original model, the individual site where a subscriber signed up received 40% of the €3.90 monthly fee. Then another 30 % went to Piano Media and the remaining 30% was shared according to the amount of time the user spent on each of the 52 media sites behind the wall. The firm then engineered a similar arrangement in Slovenia in January 2012, before taking on the much larger, but equally specific, Polish market in July of the same year.

These early successes were crucial to proving the wider viability of the firm’s paywall model. “We had to prove it could be replicated, then we had to prove it could scale,” says Peter Richards, Piano Media’s head of international operations. The firm then shifted to approaching publishing houses one by one so as to allow individual outfits to decide how much, or how little, of their content would remain behind the paywall.

Continue reading…

Studies: Digital media thriving, but press releases still most trusted

Ragan

Digital media is growing.

That may be the overarching theme of Pew’s latest State of the News Media report. It also revealed that most Americans now get their news through a digital platform, with 82 percent using their desktop or laptop and 54 percent saying they get news from their mobile device.

Daily newspapers shouldn’t be discounted quite yet. Subscriptions make up 70 percent of audience-driven revenue for media outlets, totaling $10.4 billion last year.

Inkhouse and GMI conducted a similar study recently, and found that 73 percent of news consumers turn to TV for their news, followed by news websites (52 percent), print sources (36 percent) and radio (25 percent), which barely beat out social media (23 percent).

When it comes to sharing news, email and social media are tops, with email representing 34 percent of news media shares and social right behind at 29 percent.

Click to continue reading and see infographic

Young people wary about the downsides of technology

Marketing Week

Download the full infographic here

Young people are conflicted between feeling empowered by technology and enslaved by it – a signal to brands to push their lifestyle credentials.

Most young people are cautious or cynical about the role that technology plays in their lives, new research suggests, with the vast majority (94 per cent) agreeing or somewhat agreeing that ‘people spend too much time looking at their phones and not enough time talking to each other’.

The Youth Tech report by youth research agency Voxburner and YouGov, seen exclusively by Marketing Week, also shows that 82 per cent of young people agree or somewhat agree that ‘it’s great to take a break from technology every now and again for a few days or more’. Voxburner surveyed over 1,500 UK adults aged 18 to 24 between December 2013 and January 2014 on a range of technology-related issues (see Methodology, below).

Technology addiction

The findings call into question the idea that young people are addicted to technology and inseparable from their devices. Elsewhere, the research reveals that while 40 per cent of respondents say they are ‘very interested’ in technology, only 9 per cent say they are ‘obsessed’.

“I think young people feel conflicted in their relationship with technology,” says Luke Mitchell, head of insight at Voxburner. “They love the convenience and empowerment that it brings to their everyday lives, but they also resent the fact that they feel enslaved by it.”

Mitchell notes that because technology is deeply ingrained in young people’s lives, they take it for granted and do not necessarily enjoy using it. He argues that brands should focus on how they can improve people’s lives, rather than the technology itself.

For example, he praises the dating app Tinder for helping people connect for dates in a simple and functional way. “On the Tinder home page there’s a video that explains what it does,” notes Mitchell. “Rather than labouring over the various features of the app, it shows how people don’t always have the courage to ask for a date and how Tinder can help.”

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In defense of higher cloud prices

CITEworld

It’s true, the cloud wars are heating up, with Google Cloud Platform announcing major price cuts on Tuesday and Amazon Web Services following suit less than 24 hours later at its own event on Wednesday. As a result, there’s been a lot of the usual back and forth – who’s really cheaper, is it really an apples-to-apples comparison, and what Google’s take on scalable pricing means for the ever-shifting economies of cloud computing.

No matter how you slice it, the public cloud is getting cheaper than ever before, and plenty of customers present and future stand to benefit. But I think that just as there’s a case for going to Whole Foods when you absolutely, positively need GMO-free, pesticide-free, free trade, small batch coffee, there’s always going to be room in the market for a pricier cloud that delivers premium features. In other words, there’s more to a cloud than just the price tag.

Name-drop time: Chris Kemp, Chief Strategy Officer of my former employer, private cloud appliance startup Nebula, likes to refer to Amazon Web Services as the “Walmart of the cloud.” Which is to say that Amazon Web Services is cheap and offers a tremendous range of goods, but the selection of goods themselves are incredibly shallow and purposely designed to appeal to as wide a base of customers as possible. If you just want socks, underwear, and toothpaste, it’s great. If you have a strong brand preference or just like having a wider selection, it’s probably not your first stop.

Google Compute Engine follows along these same lines: It’s a one-stop shop for cloud infrastructure designed to be everything to everyone. Want platform-as-a-service (PaaS)? Yeah, they got that. Just want infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS)? Yeah, they got that too. Need something a little more in-the-middle? Cool.

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