Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

Game Marketing Summit

04/23/2014 San Francisco CA

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Facebook Is Building A Massive New Business That Exploits A Key Weakness At Apple And Google

Business Insider

A long time ago, Facebook launched an app store. If you didn’t know that fact, don’t be alarmed. People don’t talk much about the Facebook App Center any more.

That’s because almost everyone downloads the apps they need from Apple’s App Store and the Google Play store on Android.

It’s a powerful duopoly, and everyone is used to it.

Apps and downloads are one of Apple’s fastest-growing, least-talked about businesses. They generate $4.4 billion per quarter, and are projected to be more profitable than iPads and Macs. Android and the Google Play store that supplies it run on up to 80% of smartphones in some markets.

Counterintuitively, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to regard Apple and Google’s dominance of app distribution as a weakness that he can now exploit.

The non-obvious chink in the armor is that while Apple and Google dominate the supply of apps — and take a cut of each paid download — they are lousy at promoting and marketing apps.

The marketplace for apps is surprisingly dysfunctional, given that all the players in it are self-described innovators and disruptors of dinosaur capitalism.

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Amazon, Google, or Microsoft: Which free cloud service should I use?

CITEworld

Cloud platforms are a big investment. Giving them that credit card number is the start of what could be a long relationship and many tens of thousands of dollars. So it’s a good idea to try before you buy, and if you’re using the cloud as a departmental developmental solution, it’s an even better idea to find a service that won’t cost you a penny while you get your applications and services up to speed.

That makes it well worth your time to use the various trial, test, and low-volume cloud services out there. They’ve been available for some time — especially Google’s free tier for its App Engine platform-as-a-service — and Amazon has now joined the club with a free tier for test and development. Low cost and free services like these make particular sense for individuals and teams wanting to try building their own apps.

You might still need a credit card to get started, but it won’t get billed if you stay within the services limits; so don’t use too many resources, or forget about any time limits. And if it does get billed, you can quickly cancel the service and move on.

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How the biggest news organizations tackle the mobile homepage

Mobile Marketer

The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, CNN, The New York Times and USA Today all take completely different approaches when it comes to developing a mobile homepage. Although the tactics and advertising options vary, the common thread among all of the publishers is that mobile deserves tailored, up-to-the minute news more than any other platform.

Mobile Marketer analyzed the mobile Web homepages of five news publishers to look at how the publishers — most of which have more than 50 percent of traffic coming from mobile — are shifting their news cycle approaches to accommodate for the smartphone first. The shift from a multi-column desktop set-up to a single news feed on mobile is still the underlying issue that publishers continue to play with.

“Big news is big news no matter what kind of device you use, so consistency across platforms – even between mobile and desktop – is often important,” said David Ho, editor for mobile, tablets and emerging technology at the Wall Street Journal, New York.

“We put a lot of thought into how you maintain news hierarchy and editorial intent when viewing a desktop’s multiple columns and a single column on a phone,” he said.

“That said, there are ways to do that and serve the different needs of audiences depending on where, when and how they consume and interact with news. Once you know the patterns and schedules both in the U.S. and around the world, it can guide your curation efforts.”

Here is a look at how the publishers design a mobile homepage, in alphabetical order.

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STUDY: SOCIAL MEDIA ISN’T REPLACING TRADITIONAL NEWS OUTLETS AT ALL

Fast Company

The way we consume news is a hot topic in the media industry. Startups like Circa are banking on the fact that people frequently prefer their news updates delivered in snack-sized bites. Others, like Ezra Klein’s yet-to-launch Vox, are betting big on readers who might want to wade deep into tricky, complicated subject matter, like the history of the crisis in Ukraine.

A new survey, however, unearthed some interesting data regarding our news consumption: Readers don’t seem to really care about what organization they’re getting their news from, or what device format they’re reading on; what matters, really, is the news itself.

The survey is part of the just-announced Media Insight Project, a joint effort between the American Press Institute (API), the Associated Press, and NORC at the University of Chicago. Its initial focus is on the “personal news cycle,” or how various content platforms and gadgets fit into the consumption habits of Americans.

“The findings suggest the conventional wisdom holding that media consumption divides largely along generational or ideological lines is overstated,” write the study’s administrators in the abstract, “and that some long-held beliefs about people relying on a few primary sources for news are now obsolete.” Worth noting: For this research, 1,492 adults were surveyed over the phone about their media diets.

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Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

 Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

IDG Enterprise’s 2014 Consumerization of IT in the Enterprise Research Details Integration of Consumer Devices into the Enterprise and Adoption of Cloud, MDM and Mobile Apps

Framingham, Mass. – March 24, 2014 – IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company comprising Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, CIO Executive Council, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—releases the findings from the 2014 Consumerization of IT in the Enterprise (CITE) research, highlighting the impact CITE adoption has on the enterprise; integration of cloud, apps and mobile device management; and the next wave of consumer technologies IT decision-makers need to consider.

CITE Adoption Results in New Policies and IT Purchases
The proliferation of personal devices being used for work purposes has required the majority of organizations (82%) to make changes, from creating policies on how corporate data can be shared and investing in mobile device management (MDM) solutions, to purchasing secure file sharing services. IT executives and their departments are leading the charge for integrating consumer devices into the organization. To support a culture of employees working in the office and at home, over the next two years more organizations will support employee owned smart phones and tablets and 83% of organizations will invest in mobile technologies. The approval of consumer devices in the workplace is well received by employees; CITE will have a positive impact on user satisfaction (69%), and user productivity (66%) over the next 12-18 months (check out the CITE infographic).

“Consumerization of IT in the enterprise has created significant digital disruption in the past year, and the opportunity to innovate continues with the introduction of new devices and services,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO, IDG Enterprise. “Organizations are working to mitigate risk and build security that enables employees and the businesses to use CITE technology to move the business into the digital era and create improved employee productivity and customer satisfaction.”

Click here to continue reading press release

Click here to view sample slides

Screen Shot 2014 03 24 at 1.59.46 PM Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

Pew: direct visitors to news sites are more engaged

USA Today

Chalk one up for loyal customers.

News organizations invest heavily to court web readers from Facebook and Google search results, but such referred traffic may be fleeting, according to a report released Wednesday by Pew Research Center. Direct visitors who bother to type web addresses or have bookmarked their favorite news sites are the most engaged readers, it says.

Direct visitors generally spend more time on news sites than those stumble onto a story through a search engine or Facebook, the report says. Direct visitors spend about 4 minutes and 36 seconds per visit vs. about 100 seconds for those coming from search engines or Facebook.

They’re also reading more pages — 24.8 per month vs. 4.2 for Facebook users and 4.9 for search engine readers.

Using three months of data from analytics firm Comscore, Pew researchers analyzed 26 of the most popular news websites and their three main sources of web traffic — social media referrals, search engine results and direct visits.

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Why so many digital publishers are flocking back to print

Digiday

With circulation numbers sinking and print ad rates dipping just as fast, now seems like a really bad time to start a magazine. But digital publishers like Politico, Pitchfork and Pando are doing  just that: backwards-engineering their online publications for the physical page.

The trend is a 180-degree flip from the typical publisher transition from print to digital: Whereas print publishers have sold their websites as extensions of their print products, today’s digital publishers are creating magazines to supplement their websites.

Technology blog Pando, for example, will sell its magazine Pando Quarterly to readers as part of a site membership, which also includes access to premium video and monthly events. The magazine’s content, a combination of repurposed Web stories and those written exclusively for each issue, benefits from the “innate gravitas of print,” said Paul Carr, investigations editor at Pando.

Publishers are leaning heavily on the idea that these are “premium” magazines, with deep reporting and full-page photos. Music reviews site Pitchfork even hopes that printing its quarterly magazine’s long-form features and illustrations on high-quality paper stock will encourage readers to collect them just as they collect vinyl records.

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How to Make Technology a Win-Win for the CMO and CIO

IDG Connect 0811 How to Make Technology a Win Win for the CMO and CIO

Technology used to be the exclusive realm of the CIO; now, it underpins the work of every facet of every organisation. CMOs want to use digital technology to power their campaigns and sales drives; HR wants to automate payroll and resource management; and so on. IT decision-making is now everyone’s responsibility – but rather than facing extinction, the CIO still plays a crucial role in making sure these decisions are sound.

CIOs need to play to their strengths – and in doing so, help their C-suite counterparts play to theirs. The CIO has deep technical expertise coupled with a holistic view of technology within the organisation; they’re used to ensuring that a new technology won’t wreak havoc across other parts of the system before they invest in it. This puts them in a unique position to both support other line-of-business initiatives, and also ensure compliance and internal control (so that one division’s rapid adoption doesn’t endanger another’s outcomes).

However, this doesn’t mean the CIO should be the policeman of IT; rather they should be partnering with their executive colleagues and seeking to understand their goals better. These goals are often more directly aligned with business growth and efficiency than IT’s, which have traditionally been more of the “keep the lights running” type. If you’re a CMO, the objective of your marketing and social media campaign directly impacts the business’ bottom line – but you also need technical leadership so that your campaign runs smoothly and without downtime.

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5 things that will remake big data in the next 5 years

Gigaom

Big data has evolved a lot of the past few years; from a happy buzzword to a hated buzzword, and from a focus on volume to a focus on variety and velocity. The term “big data” and the technologies that encompass it have been pored over, picked over and bastardized sometimes beyond recognition. Yet we’re at a point now where it’s finally becoming clear what all of this talk has been leading up to.

It’s a world of automation and intelligence, where it’s easier than ever to mine data, but also to build intelligence into everything from mobile apps to transportation systems. Big was never really the end goal, but the models driving this change generally feed on data to get smarter. Variety was never really a goal, it’s just that the more we can quantify, the more we can learn about the world around us.

It’s a world we’ll delve into in great detail at our Structure Data, which kicks off just a week from today (March 19) in New York. We have speakers from nearly every tech company that matters, as well from some of the biggest companies in the world and some of the smartest startups around. They’ll be talking about everything from fighting human trafficking to the future of Hadoop and the cutting edge in artificial intelligence.

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What You Think You Know About the Web Is Wrong

Time

If you’re an average reader, I’ve got your attention for 15 seconds, so here goes: We are getting a lot wrong about the web these days. We confuse what people have clicked on for what they’ve read. We mistake sharing for reading. We race towards new trends like native advertising without fixing what was wrong with the old ones and make the same mistakes all over again

Not an average reader? Maybe you’ll give me more than 15 seconds then. As the CEO of Chartbeat, my job is to work with the people who create content online (like Time.com) and provide them with real-time data to better understand their readers. I’ve come to think that many people have got how things work online quite mixed up.

Here’s where we started to go wrong: In 1994, a former direct mail marketer called Ken McCarthy came up with the clickthrough as the measure of ad performance on the web. From that moment on, the click became the defining action of advertising on the web. The click’s natural dominance built huge companies like Google and promised a whole new world for advertising where ads could be directly tied to consumer action.

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