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FLURRY : SOURCE14

04/22/2014 San Francisco CA

Game Marketing Summit

04/23/2014 San Francisco CA

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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Google looks to push Glass into the enterprise

Computerworld

Google is looking to push its wearable computer Glass into the enterprise.

With the Glass at Work program, Google is trying to make it easier forcompanies to begin using the wearable computers for their business.

“In the last year we’ve seen our Explorers use Glass in really inspiring and practical day-to-day ways,” the Google Glass team wrote on its Google+ page. “Something we’ve also noticed and are very excited about is how Explorers are using Glass to drive their businesses forward.”

The Washington Capitals, Washington D.C.’s hockey team, has already been working with fans who use Glass, Google noted. The Capitals partnered up with APX Labs to create a Glass app that allows the team’s fans to see real-time stats, instant replays and different camera angles.

The hockey team may be a good example of how businesses can take advantage of Glass, or any upcoming wearable, according to Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy.

“My contention has always been that wearables are a best fit for vertical applications,” he said. “I think this is good news and I think companies will use this program. It is Glass’ best shot so far at an ecosystem. In these vertical usage models, it’s more about getting the job done versus looking cool to your friends.”

Moorhead also noted that with Google trying to push Glass into the enterprise, it might signal the company’s realization that building out a horizontal platform will be more difficult than once thought.

Read more…

Macworld innovation through the years

SF Gate

The 30th San Francisco edition of Macworldopens Thursday with a showcase of startups that organizers not surprisingly tout as the next game changers in technology.

But predicting the future is always easier in hindsight:

“The machine uses an experimental pointing device called a ‘mouse.’ There is no evidence that people actually want to use these things,”San Francisco Examiner columnist John Dvorak wrote in a column published in 1984 by the then-jointly produced Sunday Examiner & Chronicle.

To his credit, Dvorak correctly predicted numerous reasons the original Macintosh wouldn’t be as big a hit as Apple hoped. But we now know the mouse revolutionized personal computing.

Macworld itself has transformed several times since January 1985, when that first show drew 100 exhibitors and thousands of Apple fans to Brooks Hall. At the height of its popularity, there were two annual Macworld shows, including one on the East Coast.

Center of universe

But San Francisco has remained the center of Macworld’s universe.

The legendary Chronicle columnist Herb Caen described a swanky preshow party at the St. Francis Hotel thrown by David Bunnell, then chairman of PC World Communications, publisher of Macworld magazine and sponsor of the show.

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Twitter’s Vine Introduces Direct Video Messaging

TechCrunch

Twitter’s Vine has introduced a feature that allows you to message other users directly via video. This adds both a direct messaging channel and video clips to its messages, a big addition to Twitter’s video app.

There is a direct parallel to be drawn here between Instagram’s Direct image messaging feature, obviously — and it goes hand in hand with Twitter’s renewed interest in its direct messaging channel. The allegory is interesting, as there isn’t a lot of public evidence that Direct has had any real traction. Still, it allows Twitter to experiment with video messaging in a separate silo, and it does make some sense to start with Vine before adding video messaging to Twitter.

You create a new Vine message by tapping on the Messages section, recording a video and sending it off. You can send to multiple recipients, but all of the conversations are one-to-one — much like competing messaging app Snapchat. If you send to multiple people, you’ll get separate threads for each one.

Notably, you can send Vine messages directly to anyone in your address book, regardless of whether they have Vine or not. This leverages your “private graph” in a similar way to WhatsApp’s early strategy. Twitter is likely hoping that this will spur growth much in the same way.

Offering a backchannel will also allow users to side-step the increasingly polished and professional community of Vine creators. This doubtlessly creates a barrier that stops some people from sharing because it’s not “good enough” to sit in their feeds. Like Snapchat, this allows people to post silly, stupid or funny videos that may not be as polished — or as pretty — directly to their friends.

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World Tech Update- April 10, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Microsoft ends support for Windows XP, Sony debuts a 4K point-and-shoot and we check out robots in Silicon Valley.

 

The Difference Between Google, Facebook And Microsoft Summed Up In Two Words: Augmentation Or Immersion

SF Gate

Over the last week the question of why Facebook would spend $2 billion buying Oculus Rift, a maker of virtual reality headsets has been asked repeatedly. In a world where wearable technology is generally seen as the next big thing, a pair of rather large VR goggles appears to run opposite to the approach taken by Google GOOG -2.94% and more recently Microsoft MSFT -2.15%.

Simply put, Google has taken a much more contextual approach to how it believes you and I will consume its services. It’s a strategy that sees a combination of ubiquitous mobile phones, wearable technology and globally available Internet, built upon a collection of web connected things. These things include Nest, a web connected Thermostat, Google Glass, a wearable heads up display of information and recently its  announcement of Android Wear, a version of the popular mobile OS tailored specifically for wearable tech products.  Adding to the mix are some of its ambitious R&D efforts like “Project Loon” which looks to use a global network of high-altitude balloons to connect people in rural and remote areas who have no Internet access.

Through these activities it seems Google’s strategy is to create contextual elements that augments your existing reality with data specifically tailored to you as you live your life. Or in other words, they are not looking to immerse you its world, so much as to help adapt and improve your existing world by adding to it. Combined with Google Now it’s a strategy that tries to anticipate what you need to know before you ask or even know what to ask.

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Yahoo reportedly launching YouTube rival

Computerworld

Reports are circulating that Yahoo is looking to launch a video site that would go up against Google’s behemoth YouTube.

The rumors largely stem from a Re/Code report late last week that cited anonymous sources saying Yahoo is looking to not only launch a YouTube competitor in the next few months but also is trying to pluck some of the video-sharing site’s stars and favorite networks.

A Yahoo spokeswoman declined to comment on the report.

However, Yahoo, and its CEO Marissa Mayer, have been trying to gain some traction in the online world, pulling the company back to the top where it started years ago. Yahoo was once an Internet pioneer but the years, and competitors like Google and Facebook, pushed the company back into the shadows.

Mayer, who was a top executive at Google before coming to Yahoo, wants to turn that slide around. Grabbing some of the audience from YouTube would be a huge step in making that happen.

“If Yahoo wants to be at the center of people’s entertainment, they need a video service,” said Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy. “YouTube is a free-for-all video service from cat videos to trailers to real content. Yahoo has a chance to provide less, but better content.”

Earlier this month, Mayer, speaking at the annual 4As conference, said she is focusing the company’s time and money on search, mail, mobile, social media and video.

There have been earlier signs that Yahoo wants to step up its presence in video. Last May, reports circulated that Yahoo was in talks to acquire Hulu, a video site known for streaming TV shows and movies, for as much as $800 million. The purchase never came through as Hulu’s owners canceled plans to sell the company.

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BUILD 2014 reveals the cloud side of Nadella’s Microsoft

CITEworld

Satya Nadella’s Microsoft is all about “mobile and the cloud,” a more nuanced view of what it means to be a devices and services business. So if day one of its BUILD developer conference was all about the mobile, it’s not surprising that day two was all about the cloud — with Cloud and Server chief Scott Guthrie making 44 separate announcements about Azure in the course of his keynote.

Microsoft’s Azure cloud service has been the driver for much of the company’s recent innovation, with its mix of infrastructure and platform features. Working with Azure has meant working with its web portal every time you wanted to create new virtual machines. Microsoft is streamlining the process for developers, so you can now create a virtual machine straight from Visual Studio. You can also manage your existing VMs, and even remotely debug apps running across devices and the cloud.

Increased automation makes Azure, and the cloud as a whole, more palatable to IT departments. With support for Puppet and Chef, you’re now able to automate configuration management across a flexible fabric of virtual servers. By adding open configuration management tooling to Azure Microsoft is making its cloud surprisingly portable — you can take those configurations and use the same tools to deploy them on other, competing, infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds. Microsoft is also using its own tooling to simplify defining and provisioning virtual servers, with its PowerShell scripting environment now supporting a JSON-based template language that can be used to deploy not just servers and applications, but also the low level connections that form the foundations of a cloud application.

Azure’s web platform is perhaps the most visible element of its Platform as a Service (Paas) aspect. It’s now able to autoscale web sites, helping your apps keep online as loads fluctuate. There’s also support for a new Webjobs role, which offloads work to background threads running in any supported language, and tools for handling traffic across Azure’s global network of data centers. You can now also use Azure as a development platform for web applications, with private staging sites that can be swapped for live sites at a click of a button.

Continue reading…

How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts

The Atlantic

It’s been eight years since Twitter debuted. Like the rest of the social networks that have survived, it has changed, both in response to user and commercial demands. The user interface, application ecosystem, geographical distribution, and culture not what they were in 2010, let alone 2006.

But each Twitter user sees the service through his or her own tiny window of followers and followed. It’s hard to tell if everyone’s behavior is changing, or just that of one’s subset of the social network. Now, new research from Yabing Liu and Alan Mislove of Northeastern with Brown’s Chloe Kliman-Silverattempts to quantify the way tweeting has changed through the years.

“Twitter is known to have evolved significantly since its founding,” they write, “And it remains unclear how much the user base and behavior has evolved, whether prior results still hold, and whether the (often implicit) assumptions of proposed systems are still valid.”

While their paper is directed at fellow researchers, their results might be of interest to anyone whose ever used Twitter. They combined three datasets to come up with 37 billion tweets from March of 2006 until the end of 2013. The key thing to know is that they talk about two different datasets: What they call the “crawl” dataset constitutes all the tweets, and what they call the “gardenhose” dataset constitutes only a sample of either 15 percent of all tweets (until July 2010) or 10 percent of all tweets (after July 2010).

OK, with that caveat, here are some of their most interesting findings.

Click to see charts and continue reading 

Late to the enterprise mobility party, Microsoft arrives with big plans

CITEworld

After last week’s launch of Office for iPad, the announcement of the Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility Suite, and the news from the company’s BUILD conference this week, it seems that Microsoft has finally gotten to the enterprise mobility party in terms of devices and in terms of infrastructure.

With Windows Phone 8.1, the company is finally building a range of enterprise security and management capabilities into its mobile platform. Microsoft is also making it easier for developers to write code that crosses all of its platforms, something that’s useful for consumer, business, and enterprise app development.

While most of the focus this week has been on devices and developer resources, Microsoft is also making some powerful plays in terms of enterprise mobility infrastructure. When I spoke with Microsoft vice president Brad Anderson back in January, it was clear that Microsoft had high aspirations in terms of entering the enterprise mobility space. At the time, Intune’s mobile management capabilities were far from complete  – and, for iOS and Android, they still are below the benchmarks of many EMM vendors at this point. But it was clear that Microsoft was going to be making rapid improvements and expanding the scope of its capabilities.

The scale of that strategy came into focus as Satya Nadella announced Office for iPad alongside a new vision of Microsoft as a “mobile-first and cloud-first company.”

The Enterprise Mobility Suite builds together a range of technologies that are likely to add up to being more than the sum of their parts.

The suite builds on the multi-platform mobile management capabilities that Microsoft began implementing last year and advanced in January. Those capabilities, part of the company’s  Intune cloud-based device management solution, included support for managing iOS and Android devices in addition to devices running various flavors of Windows.

Continue reading…

How Nielsen’s OCR Will Impact Digital Video Advertising

MediaPost

For decades, the gross rating point (GRP) metric has been used in television advertising to calculate campaign exposure with respect to reach and frequency against a target demographic audience. GRPs are  now available for digital video advertising through Nielsen online campaign ratings (OCR). The ad industry had been pushing for the ability to compare TV buys to digital video — and it’s finally arrived, opening the door to a new kind of conversation between TV and digital buyers.

Digital buyers need to prepare for this before it happens. They have an opportunity to evaluate digital video advertising through the lens of a TV buyer before it’s forced on them. If there’s ever a time to be proactive about something, it’s now. Here’s how a digital buyer can be proactive with respect to GRP measurement:

First, recognize that the only impressions that matter to a TV buyer are those that reach the target demographic. For example, if the on-target demo is men ages 18-34, any impressions that reach anyone outside this demo will be considered wasted impressions. So, evaluating a digital buy on TV standards means considering off-target impressions as waste.

Second, develop an in-depth understanding of how well the digital video impressions bought for a campaign match the campaign’s on-target demo. It would be easy here to assume that, thanks to audience buying, a digital video buy would have very low levels of off-target waste. However, when Nielsen OCR is used to evaluate the on-target percent of a digital buy, it’s using different data than any third-party demographic data used for audience buying today. Digital buyers will want to understand the discrepancies between the targeting they’ve been using and the on-target percent evaluation that’s built into OCR.

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