Events
Event Date Location

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

OMMA mCommerce

08/07/2014 New York New York

CIO 100 Symposium & Awards

08/17/2014 - 08/19/2014 Rancho Palos Verdes CA

Mobile Insider Summit

08/17/2014 - 08/20/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

Social Media Insider Summit

08/20/2014 - 08/23/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

iMedia Agency Summit (Malaysia)

08/25/2014 - 08/27/2014 Kota Kinabalu Malaysia

The 6th annual Mobile World

08/28/2014 Seoul

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Putting the Spotlight on the Mobile Evolution

Digital Marketing Magazine

A new Global Mobile Survey, from IDG Global Solutions (IGS), has put a spotlight on the evolution of mobile in the biggest study of consumer and business’ use of mobile devices.

The survey highlights a dramatic increase in mobile video consumption with 74% of consumers use a smartphone to watch online videos compared with 61% in 2012. Additionally, mobile is replacing traditional media as 50% of respondents use a tablet to read newspapers and 40% have replaced either the desktop or laptop with a tablet device.

The boundaries between business and personal life are becoming increasingly blurred as 80% of all respondents research products or services for business on a tablet in the evening. However, a lack of mobile enabled websites and concerns about security remain the biggest barriers to the growth of purchases on smartphone.

The survey, conducted among more than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries, focuses on four key areas:

Mobile Executives: How executives use mobile devices – especially for business

Mobile Business: How and when audiences research and purchase products on mobile devices

Mobile Millennials vs. Generation X: Differences in consumer behaviour across video, social and commerce

Mobile Lifestyle: How audiences use multiple screens, socialise and buy on mobile devices

The research also reveals that video consumption has become pervasive on mobile devices with 75% of respondents using smartphones and 87% tablets to watch online video. Millennials and C-Suite executives meanwhile are near equal consumers of tablet video with 92% of 18- to 24-year-olds while 91% of senior executive (CEO/COO/Chairman/President) reporting they watch video on their tablet. Both audiences access all kinds of video content, including YouTube, movies, TV shows and training guides, although senior executives are twice as likely as Millennials to watch promotional videos.

Christina Carstensen, IDG Global Solutions, said: “The ‘mobile evolution’ is having a profound effect on consumers and businesses. It has kick-started the ‘always-on’ culture, presenting brands with unprecedented opportunities to develop closer relationships with their customers. We have moved beyond media convergence to a convergence of technology and humans, and brands more than ever need to show their human side to communicate in a relevant, engaging and intuitive way.”

Mobile Executives

For senior executives, smartphones are a critical business tool. The majority of senior executives (92%) own a smartphone used for business with 77% reporting they use their smartphone to research a product or service for their business. While the majority (93%) go on to purchase that product via the Internet using a laptop or desktop, 50% of these executives have purchased IT products for business using their smartphone with 13% reporting making a purchase between $1,000 to $4,999 USD. (£600–2,999; €700–3,499).

Security concerns (45%) and having a website not mobile enabled (43%) were the most common reasons for this audience not to purchase a product via smartphone. Like mainstream consumers, senior executives want an omni-channel purchase environment to seamlessly move between devices to make IT purchases.

Mobile for Business

Tablet ownership has exploded among survey respondents rising from 20% in 2011 to 61% in 2014. In Latin America, 41% of respondents said their tablet had replaced their laptop computer with 59% reporting using their tablet device to purchase IT products for their business, the highest percentage of all regions surveyed. Software and computer accessories were the IT products most frequently purchased for business across all regions, reflecting significant opportunity for IT companies willing to invest in mobile commerce innovations such as shoppable video.

Millennials vs. Generation X

Nearly all respondents aged 18-34 owned a smartphone and 91% of 18-24 year olds and 85% of 25-34 year olds used social networking sites and apps on their smartphone. Only 38% of 18-24 year olds owned a tablet, however. Tablet ownership jumps to 55% among 25 to 34 year olds and 65% report using another device or screen, primarily television (83%) at the same time as their tablet.

To reach these audiences, tech marketers are now competing with mainstream brands on Facebook or trying to grab their audience’s attention during television programs. B2B brands investing in quality social content or video with high production values comparable to television are most likely to engage young influencers and stimulate social media shares.

Mobile Tech Lifestyle: Multitasking

The majority of Global Mobile Survey respondents are multitasking: 61% use another device at the same times as their tablet and 58% use another device at the same time as their smartphone. In both cases the majority of activity on these devices is unrelated.

 

What Google Understands: Context Is King

Mashable

If Google I/O 2014 were a military campaign, it would have been called Operation: Android Everywhere. From wristwatches to TVs to cars, Google extended the reach of its mobile operating system far beyond the smartphone, deploying new Androids to conquer territory that will determine who controls our connected future.

Android WearAndroid AutoAndroid TV — each one puts Google software into devices that we use every day. Surprisingly there was no talk about Android Home, but no doubt that’s coming — just as soon as Google works out exactly its acquisition of Nest Labs will fit into that picture.

The presence of Android on these platforms wasn’t new in itself. After all, there have already been plenty of third-party cars, TV sets and wearables that run Android. But what Google brings to the picture is a greater vision than just having a device that’s “smart.”

As the owner of the platform, it is in the perfect place to deliver a unified experience — the same way Apple does.

What Google was really selling at I/O was context, or more precisely contextual awareness of devices. A watch that runs Android is good; a watch that’s aware of where your phone is and which apps are on it is better. When the two devices are aware of each other, new functionality is created.

The upshot for the consumer: a whole new level of convenience.

“The integration between the different platforms is more important than any of the platforms themselves,” says Kelly Merrell, director of Android development for Mercury, which builds the TED app. “The watch itself is interesting, but what the watch can do when connected to the phone — like the lock screen using the wearable to say, ‘This is the right person that’s holding the phone.’

“The phone by itself can’t do it. The watch by itself can’t do it. It’s only when the two exist, there’s now new functionality unveiled just because of that connectivity.”

Android where?

Android Wear is fundamentally different from the Android smartwatches that came before it. Other models typically require the user to download separate software for each individual app that works with the watch — a tedious process at best.

With Android Wear, app notifications simply start appearing on the watch the moment you link it with your phone. To borrow a phrase that’s often associated with Apple products: It just works.

“You can pretty much put Android on everything already, but the level of integration you’re going to get is pretty limited,”says Ken Kyger, a developer for Cloudspace. “How many smartwatches are out there? And they all run Android or some fork of Android, but none of them really give that full, immersive rich experience.”

Part of context is knowing what data to share and what not to. Credit where it’s due here: Google learned a lot about how to do this properly with Glass. Android Wear watches, for example, don’t show you every single Foursquare check-in Twitter @reply but instead they’re grouped, prompting you to go to the phone for the full experience.

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More than half of 25 to 34-year olds have a tablet, says new research

CNET

Tablets are replacing computers, according to new figures, as we voraciously eat up online video from YouTube to Netflix.

Industry analysts IDG polled 23,500 people across 43 countries about their use of mobile devices. The survey focuses on the habits of business executives as well as comparing the behaviour of members of generation X — people roughly in their thirties to fifties — with younger millenials, who largely grew up with the Internet.

Nearly everybody surveyed owned a smartphone. Older people are more likely to own a tablet: more than half of 25 to 34-year olds have an iPad or similar device, but only a third of 18 to 24-year olds can say the same.

40 percent of those surveyed have replaced their desktop computer or laptop with a tablet. They don’t just use their tablet for checking Facebook and watching cat videos on YouTube: a whopping 80 percent admit to using their tablet for work-related research in the evenings.

Video tasty

IDG highlights the explosion in video watched on mobile devices in recent years, including phones and tablets. Three quarters of respondents use a smartphone to watch online videos, up from 61 per cent in 2012.

One of the reasons the growth in mobile video watching is significant is that video requires more data sent to a device — especially if it’s in high definition — which uses more bandwidth. As a result, mobile phone networks reckon video puts a strain on their network.

During the World Cup, for example, soccer fans have turned to their phones or tablets to follow games kicking off at times when they’re at work or out of the house. EE, the UK’s first 4G network, saw record traffic generated by streaming online video. The biggest spikes involved coverage of England’s ill-fated game against Uruguay and replays of Australian superstar Tim Cahill’s stunning volleyed goal against Holland.

Despite these figures on tablet use, other analysts have suggested that tablet sales could be impacted by phablets, as consumers plump for a smartphone with a video-friendly larger screen rather than buying a phone and tablet separately.

Worldwide PC Monitor Market Undergoes a Slight Decline in the First Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 Worldwide PC Monitor Market Undergoes a Slight Decline in the First Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

Worldwide PC monitor shipments totaled nearly 33.7 million units in the first quarter of 2014 (1Q14), a year-over-year decline of -0.4%, according to the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly PC Monitor Tracker. IDC expects worldwide shipments to continue on their current trajectory, slipping to 106 million units for the full year 2018.

“Despite the overall decline, the shipment totals were stronger than the forecast of 31 million units,” said Phuong Hang, Program Director, Worldwide Trackers at IDC. “Geographically, Japan and the Middle East and Africa (MEA) regions delivered the largest gains during the first quarter while Dell and HP both experienced solid shipment growth.”

Technology Highlights

  • LED backlight technology adoption continues to increase with a new high of 92% market share in 1Q14. This represents a year-over-year increase of 16.4%.
  • Screen size of 21.x-inches wide has held the largest worldwide share for the last six quarters, with 20.5% share in 1Q14.
  • Aspect ratio of 16:9 continues to dominate with 81.3% market share, which is 6.5 times the second most widely used Aspect ratio of 16:10.
  • Touch screen monitors are still a small segment of the total PC monitor market at 0.4% share, with sales mostly in the U.S. at 32.8% of the total. HP holds a 35.1% share of the U.S. market.

Vendor Highlights

  • Dell – Dell maintained its number 1 position in 1Q14 with worldwide market share of 14.9% on shipments of 5.0 million units. Japan and Western Europe delivered the biggest gains for Dell with 32.4% and 14.7% quarter-over-quarter growth respectively, while the U.S. market remained essentially flat.
  • Samsung –Samsung regained the number 2 position from last quarter in terms of total units shipped and maintained the top position in terms of total revenue with $1.11 billion in 1Q14. Its revenue represents 18.4% share in total market value.
  • HP – Despite being ranked number 3 worldwide, HP holds the number 1 position in Canada and number 2 in the U.S. HP posted 8.9% year-over-year growth for the quarter.
  • LG – LG maintained its number 4 position and continues to be the number 1 PC monitor vendor in Latin America with 33% share. It also achieved a new high in unit shipments of 3.5 million in 1Q14.
  • Lenovo – Lenovo rounded out the Top 5 vendor ranking in 1Q14, buoyed by its number 1 position in Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan)(APeJ) with 2 million units. Lenovo’s biggest gains in the quarter were in Japan and Western Europe with 16.6% and 5.3%, respectively.

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A 10-sensor iWatch says Apple’s smartwatch will be nothing like Android Wear

IDG News Service

If Apple’s iWatch design brief includes 10 sensors, then the all-but-inevitable smartwatch won’t be a simple device. It will be aimed squarely at exercise enthusiasts, quantified-selfers, and anyone concerned about an expanding waist line.

And the iWatch would also be nothing like Android Wear smartwatches from the likes of LG and Motorola—gadgets that will use Google Now to push information like sports scores, weather alerts and navigation directions. This foreshadows a war between two entirely different philosophies in the wristband space. Apple’s proposition: A smartwatch should be dedicated to telling you about what’s happening inside your body. Google’s stance: A smartwatch should be focused on the world around you.

On Friday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Apple’s upcoming smartwatch will include “more than 10 sensors” to track health and fitness activity, according to multiple unnamed sources. The report also backs up an early Reuters article that says Apple’s wearable will be manufactured by Quanta Computer in Taiwan. The Journal’s anonymous sources say the smartwatch will come in “multiple screen sizes” (the Reuters article only mentions a 2.5-inch display), and that the wearable could be released in October, with shipments hitting between 10 and 15 million units by the end of the year.

Given that more than 51 million iPhone 5 units sold during last year’s holiday season, the iWatch—even if it hits 15 million sales—would still be a relatively niche product for Apple. The Wall Street Journal report remains unsubstantiated, of course, but if Apple ultimately goes all-in with a health-focused wearable, it will have a natural companion to its just announced Health app.

That’s great product synergy for Apple, but such a wearable would also be pursuing a market that has, apparently, failed to find traction with consumers. According to a January 2014 study by Endeavor Partners [PDF], more than half of all people who’ve purchased a wearable activity tracker have given up on their devices. (This particular wearable category emerged in 2012.)

The Journal reports that Apple “aims to address an overarching criticism of existing smartwatches that they fail to provide functions significantly different from that of a smartphone.” That’s a lofty goal, and we might assume that the iWatch’s battery of sensors will be able to track our heart rate, skin temperature, and rates of perspiration.

But Samsung already has wristbands that track heart rate, and they don’t work very well. And Basis makes the Basis B1, a wearable that tracks all three data points—yet the company remains anonymous to all but a niche collection of quantified-self disciples. 

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Mobile Shopping Drives UK Retail Ecommerce Sales

eMarketer

Shopping on mobile devices will account for a rapidly growing share of UK retail ecommerce sales and is expected to contribute to strong ecommerce sales growth this year, according to new figures from eMarketer. Already, over one-quarter of all online sales in the UK take place via smartphones and tablets; by 2018, that figure will near two in five.

174083 Mobile Shopping Drives UK Retail Ecommerce Sales

 eMarketer estimates that UK retail ecommerce sales will rise 16.0% this year, helped by an improving economy, shoppers’ increasing use of mobile devices for making purchases, and expanded options for purchase delivery. Total retail sales in the UK, by contrast, will grow by just 3.6% in 2014, and movement will slow after that. Meanwhile, the growth trajectory for mcommerce sales is even steeper, with a predicted 64.8% rise this year.

“Mcommerce is seeing such good growth for a couple of reasons: Mobile device ownership is rising rapidly, and consumers are becoming more comfortable making purchases on these devices. Tablets, in particular, offer a larger and more tactile interface for online shopping, which is why we’re seeing particularly fast growth in tablet commerce,” explained Bill Fisher, UK analyst at eMarketer.

Retail sales on tablets are growing considerably faster than those on smartphones in the UK, even though smartphone usage is far more common than tablet usage. Tablets—with their larger, more inviting screens and their general use at home in the evenings, typically via broadband connection—will contribute roughly double the level of sales than smartphones will this year, accounting for nearly two-thirds of total UK mcommerce sales.

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IDG World Tech Update- June 6, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Google wants to be everywhere, the Supreme Court rules cell phones are private during an arrest and technology helps a quadriplegic regain use of his hands.

 

IDG Enterprise’s Computerworld and CSO Go Digital-Only

Folio

IDG Enterprise is closing the U.S. print editions of Computerworld and CSO. The group, which also publishes InfoWorld, CIO and Network World, among others, plans to keep the brands on a digital and event-centric publishing model.

June CSO and the June 23rd Computerworld, a biweekly, will be the final print issues. CSO has a circulation of 27,000 and Computerworld is 165,000.

The digital audiences are comparably larger—Computerworld averages 2.9 million uniques and CSO averages 228,000.

As it stands, the brands’ current model is  a mix of sponsor and ad revenue along with events, marketing services and data programs, says IDG Enterprise CEO Matthew Yorke.

“Readers can get access to additional premium content by registering for a free Insider membership,” he says. “We are developing new models, which incorporate sponsor/ad revenues as well as a paid model for exclusive content and resources (in addition to the premium content that anyone will be able to access. The entire site will not require a paid subscription).

According to Yorke, there will be no staff reductions related to the change. “Resources will be re-allocated to the premium Insider content and that strategy.”

IDG, and other tech-oriented publishers, have been pursuing this model for years now, gradually shutting down print magazines and transitioning the brands to digital and live event models, while simultaneously building out their marketing services groups.

IDG Enterprise’s InfoWorld transitioned to a digital-only model in 2007. More recently, Network World followed that same path. PC World, which isn’t part of the IDG Enterprise division, also went digital-only in 2013.

Yorke remarked at the recent Folio: Growth Summit that the company manages print for profit—and if there is none, then it’s either treated as a marketing expense or transitioned out of the model.

CIO is the only other IDG Enterprise brand that still has a print component.

 

As iPhone thefts drop, Google and Microsoft plan kill switches on smartphones

IDG News Service

Responding to more than a year of pressure, Google and Microsoft will follow Apple in adding an anti-theft “kill switch” to their smartphone operating systems, U.S. law enforcement officials will announce later Thursday.

The commitment will be disclosed alongside new data that shows a dramatic drop in theft of Apple iPhones and iPads after the September 2013 introduction of iOS 7, which included a kill-switch function that allows stolen devices to be remotely locked and deleted so they become useless.

In New York, iPhone theft was down 19 percent in the first five months of this year, which is almost double the 10 percent drop in overall robberies seen in the city. Over the same period, thefts of Samsung devices — which did not include a kill switch until one was introduced on Verizon-only models in April — rose by over 40 percent.

In San Francisco, robberies of iPhones were 38 percent lower in the six months after the iOS 7 introduction versus the six months before, while in London thefts over the same period were down by 24 percent. In both cities, robberies of Samsung devices increased.

“These statistics validate what we always knew to be true, that a technological solution has the potential to end the victimization of wireless consumers everywhere,” San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon told IDG News Service.

Gascon and New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman have been leading a push to get smartphone vendors and telecom carriers to include kill switches in their products as a way to curb phone theft.

The joint work had early success with Apple but other carriers and phone makers dragged their feet. However, resistance to the idea appears to be dropping as several bills that mandate kill switches make their way through state legislatures and the U.S. Congress.

The bills demand a function that would enable a phone owner to remotely delete and disable a phone if stolen. The function could be disabled by consumers before a theft takes place if desired, but crucially new handsets would be supplied with it switched on by default.

Gascon and Schneiderman believe that if most phones had a kill switch, thefts would drop because the probability of a stolen phone remaining useful and thus having value would greatly diminish.

The two said the data being released on Thursday appears to “validate the kill switch as an effective part of a multi-layered approach to combatting smartphone crimes.” Although it’s worth remembering that crime is a complex subject and other factors could have contributed to the fall in Apple-related thefts or the rise in those of Samsung phones.

“We must ensure these solutions are deployed in a more effective manner that does not rely on consumers to seek them out an turn them on, but the fact that virtually the entire industry has responded to our call to actionA is anA indication that we are well on our way toA ending this public safety crisis,” Gascon said.

Microsoft goof confirms Surface Mini

IDG News Service

Microsoft has inadvertently confirmed that it had a smaller Surface tablet ready to release when it unveiled the larger Surface Pro 3 last month.

Eagle-eyed observers today pointed out that the Surface Mini, a long-rumored small tablet, was referenced several times in the Surface Pro 3 User Guide, which is available online.

Microsoft started selling some models of the Surface Pro 3 in retail today, and began delivering devices that customers had pre-ordered since the May 20 introduction.

The Surface Mini was featured most predominantly in the user guide’s discussion of the Surface Pen, a writing and sketching tool that comes with the Surface Pro 3, and apparently would have accompanied the smaller tablet, too. Mentions of OneNote, Microsoft’s note-taking app, were scattered throughout the guide, including the sections where the Surface Mini was mentioned.

“Click the top button [of the Surface Pen] to open OneNote, even if your Surface is locked,” the guide stated. “Bluetooth technology links your Surface Pen to your Surface Mini or Surface Pro 3, so when you click the button, your Surface responds instantly [emphasis added].”

That matches what some reported prior to Microsoft’s May 20 event: The Surface Mini, those reports claimed, would be pitched as a note-taking device, and released in time for the back-to-school sales season.

The Surface Mini was assumed to be a 7-in. or 8-in. tablet akin to the Surface 2, the second-generation of the Surface RT, a tablet powered by Windows RT, the tablet-only operating system that features colorful tiles and boasts a new ecosystem of apps.

The day before the Surface event, Computerworld reported that Microsoft would not unveil the Surface Mini. Later accounts elsewhere claimed that the device was pulled from the presentation — and thus release — at the last minute as executives feared that the Mini wasn’t sufficiently different from lower-priced rivals to do well in the market.

Microsoft’s skittishness may have stemmed from memories of the $900 million write-off it took in mid-2013 to account for lackluster sales and overstocked inventories of the original Surface RT tablet.

It’s possible that Microsoft will eventually launch a smaller Surface, perhaps even the built-but-not-sold Surface Mini, but the company has not publicly confirmed the tablet’s existence, much less a timeline for its release.

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