Advertising & Marketing Events
Event Date Location

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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How Nielsen’s OCR Will Impact Digital Video Advertising

MediaPost

For decades, the gross rating point (GRP) metric has been used in television advertising to calculate campaign exposure with respect to reach and frequency against a target demographic audience. GRPs are  now available for digital video advertising through Nielsen online campaign ratings (OCR). The ad industry had been pushing for the ability to compare TV buys to digital video — and it’s finally arrived, opening the door to a new kind of conversation between TV and digital buyers.

Digital buyers need to prepare for this before it happens. They have an opportunity to evaluate digital video advertising through the lens of a TV buyer before it’s forced on them. If there’s ever a time to be proactive about something, it’s now. Here’s how a digital buyer can be proactive with respect to GRP measurement:

First, recognize that the only impressions that matter to a TV buyer are those that reach the target demographic. For example, if the on-target demo is men ages 18-34, any impressions that reach anyone outside this demo will be considered wasted impressions. So, evaluating a digital buy on TV standards means considering off-target impressions as waste.

Second, develop an in-depth understanding of how well the digital video impressions bought for a campaign match the campaign’s on-target demo. It would be easy here to assume that, thanks to audience buying, a digital video buy would have very low levels of off-target waste. However, when Nielsen OCR is used to evaluate the on-target percent of a digital buy, it’s using different data than any third-party demographic data used for audience buying today. Digital buyers will want to understand the discrepancies between the targeting they’ve been using and the on-target percent evaluation that’s built into OCR.

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Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

Quartz

 Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

The above chart comes from data released by SNL Kagan earlier this month. It highlights the fact that, despite all of the ink spilt in recent years bemoaning the internet driven demise of traditional media, such businesses remain very, very profitable.

The most profitable “old media” business in America last year was John Malone’s Liberty Media, which among other assets, owns the Atlanta Braves major league baseball franchise; 26% of America’s fourth-largest cable provider, Charter Communications; and 27% of concert promoter Live Nation. (Although it’s worth pointing out the company enjoyed a one-off accounting gain worth $7.5 billion, after it changed the way it treats an investment in satellite radio operator Sirius XM on its books).

There’s a common thread between the rest of the top five (and at least half of the list): they produce and sell television shows and/or movies. 21st Century Fox is the company behind the eponymous network, cable channels (like Fox News) and Hollywood film studios; Disney makes nearly half of its revenue out of its media networks division, which includes the juggernaut that is ESPN;  Time Warner owns HBO and CNN among other businesses ; Viacom is the company behind MTV, Nickelodeon and the Paramount line of film studios.

It is also worth pointing out that Google, by many definitions a media business (it makes most of its money out of search advertising) is more profitable than any company on the list. But among internet media  (or so-called “new media”) businesses, it’s the glaring exception.

 Traditional media is still a great business to be in, if you’re selling video

All the same, internet companies like Facebook (net income was up 4,600% in 2013) and Netflix (up 555%) are growing at a rapid pace. So it might not be that long before they are among the biggest media businesses—however you choose to define one—as well.

YouTube sees money in gaming-video eyeballs

Reuters

To imagine how YouTube might one day become a money-spinner for content producers, consider the power of the irreverent video gamer and online star PewDiePie over his young, free-spending audience.

Each time the wildly popular YouTube impresario has donned Razer headphones in one of the many zany videos that feature him playing games, the product has sold out.

PewDiePie, who is not paid to endorse the brand, “really helped us in terms of getting traction on a much larger audience,” said Min-Liang Tan, chief executive of San Diego-based Razer, which makes gaming hardware. “It’s incredible that YouTube personalities are coming up … and I think it can only grow.”

PewDiePie’s uncanny trendsetting talent highlights the potential that content related to video games holds for Google Inc as it looks for ways to build its YouTube video platform into a powerful new revenue stream.

Advertisers and media companies are indeed already placing big bets on the likes of PewDiePie and others creating gaming-related content in a bid for the prime but underserved audience of 18- to 34-year-olds that devour video games.

Just last week Walt Disney Co agreed to fork over as much as $950 million to buy Maker Studios, one of YouTube’s largest production and distribution networks. PewDiePie, whose real name is Felix Kjellberg, is Maker’s biggest star.

The success of the 24-year-old, with his profanity laced improvisational videos, matches the explosive growth of video-game-based channels on YouTube. His channel has more than 25 million subscribers who can view his content for free, more than Beyonce’s and PresidentBarack Obama’s channels combined.

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Google+ and LinkedIn drive few, but more engaged social referrals compared to Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

The Next Web

Social discovery and sharing platform Shareaholictoday released its first report examining engaged social referrals. Since many of us spend an egregious amount of time using social media, the company was interested in answering the question “What is our behavior post-click, when we actually interact with a link one of our friends shared socially?”

As such, it was necessary to examine the average visit duration, pages per visit, and bounce rate for each of the top eight social media platforms. Here’s the breakdown (data is from September 2013 to February 2014) from Shareholic, which tracks 250 million users visiting its network of 200,000 publishers.

We already know that LinkedIn and Google+ drive very few referrals compared to their competitors. Yet it turns out the traffic they do drive, is actually quite high on the quality scale.

Google+ users spend more than three minutes diving into links shared by their circles, view 2.45 pages during each visit, and bounce only 50.63 percent of the time. LinkedIn users meanwhile spend over two minutes on each link they click, view 2.23 pages with each visit, and bounce 51.28 percent of the time.

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CSOonline.com and CITEworld.com Relaunch Incorporating Responsive Design

 CSOonline.com and CITEworld.com Relaunch Incorporating Responsive Design

Framingham, Mass. – April 4, 2014 – IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company comprising Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, CIO Executive Council, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—announces the release of enhanced site designs for both CSOonline.com and CITEworld.com. The new designs incorporate responsive technologies, optimizing the websites based on the user’s screen size, whether they are using a smartphone, tablet of desktop, to ensure usability and consistency for all users.

“The traffic to IDG Enterprise’s portfolio of websites from mobile devices continues to increase and now accounts for 14% of traffic. As a digital centric organization we constantly evaluate opportunities to improve the experience for our IT decision-maker readers and the tech marketers looking to engage them,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO of IDG Enterprise.

Website Enhancements Include:

  • Websites built with responsive design, including HTML5 and CSS3, to ensure usability and consistency for visitors using smartphones, tablets or desktops.
  • Navigation migrated to a menu icon, next to the website logo, where visitors can navigate to key sections.
  • Back end capabilities enhancing search functionality and digital asset management for displaying more images and video content.
  • Shared functionality across IDG Enterprise sites for seamless execution of banner ads, lead generation and native advertising, making promotions more effective.
  • Single, searchable “Resource Library” supporting all types of lead generation content.
  • Redefined article pages with less pagination for an improved reading experience, while maintaining ad impression impact.

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World Tech Update, April 3, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Microsoft debuts its Cortana voice assistant, the Apple-Samsung trial kicks off in Silicon Valley and the mainframe celebrates 50.

 

Paywalls open doors

The Economist

PIANO MEDIA began as a simple idea based on the business model of television cable subscriptions. The thinking went that if people were willing to pay a single fee to access a bundle of TV channels, perhaps they would do the same for online media. The logic behind the Slovak firm has recently proved itself commercially sound: Piano Media announced a deal earlier this month with Newsweek, the re-launched American magazine.

Piano Media was created three years ago amid widespread doubt that customers would ever pay for online content. Nevertheless, the firm began by constructing a paywall system that encompassed most leading media in Slovakia.

With just 5m people and a unique language, Slovakia made a convenient test case. By accumulating a critical mass in a linguistically closed market, Piano Media and online publishers were able to drive subscriptions. In this original model, the individual site where a subscriber signed up received 40% of the €3.90 monthly fee. Then another 30 % went to Piano Media and the remaining 30% was shared according to the amount of time the user spent on each of the 52 media sites behind the wall. The firm then engineered a similar arrangement in Slovenia in January 2012, before taking on the much larger, but equally specific, Polish market in July of the same year.

These early successes were crucial to proving the wider viability of the firm’s paywall model. “We had to prove it could be replicated, then we had to prove it could scale,” says Peter Richards, Piano Media’s head of international operations. The firm then shifted to approaching publishing houses one by one so as to allow individual outfits to decide how much, or how little, of their content would remain behind the paywall.

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Facebook Reveals 10 Year Plan, Confident on Mobile

The Street

NEW YORK (TheStreet) - Facebook (FB_) CEO Mark Zuckerberg revealed the company’s thinking process around its three, five and ten year strategy in a conference call with analysts to explain the social network’s $2 billion acquisition of Oculus VR, a virtual reality platform that venture capital investors in the company compare to Silicon Valley’s biggest breakthroughs such as the Apple (AAPL_II, the iPhone, the Macintosh, Netscape and Google (GOOG_).

Investors puzzling over Facebook’s apparent entrance into virtual reality may be heartened by the clearer picture of the company’s medium-to-long-term thinking provided by CEO Zuckerberg. They also may be comforted by Zuckerberg’s increasing confidence that Facebook has solved its problems in bringing more than 1 billion monthly active users (MAUs) to mobile devices.

Those two developments, expressed on Tuesday evening in a call with analysts, may have more bearing on Facebook’s share price than the immediate impact of the Oculus VR acquisition. The company Facebook is acquiring is still in the process of developing its next generation product after using crowd-funding platform Kickstarter to raise $2.4 million to develop its first product, Oculus Rift.

While Facebook is shelling out $400 million in cash and $1.6 billion in stock for Oculus VR, in addition to an additional $300 million earn-out in cash and stock incentives, Oculus VR is unlikely to have any impact on the company’s earnings in the next few years.

On Tuesday, Facebook was unwilling to provide specific financial guidance on the acquisition or how it came upon a price, but CFO David Ebersman noted that the company focused on the games business because it’s the furthest along. It is worth noting no bankers were hired to advise Facebook’s acquisition, indicating CEO Mark Zuckerberg is confident he can be an effective dealmaker in Silicon Valley.

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Smartphone innovation is slowing, so what’s next?

Computerworld

In the last year or so, there has been a noticeable slowdown in innovations in new smartphones — with both hardware and software.

In a five-year smartphone forecast through 2018 released last week, research firm IDC noted: “It has been widely acknowledged that the pace of innovation on smartphones has slowed down, even reached a plateau. Indeed, many of the new innovations launched in 2013 appeared to be incremental improvements on a theme, and it was questionable whether many of them would have lasting value.”

With smartphone innovation flattening, the next direction seems to be making the smartphone the hub — connected via Bluetooth, primarily — to emerging technologies. These systems include smartwatches, other wearable devices and everything in the much larger ecosystem of home appliances, cars and other products that, when connected, would comprise what’s being called the Internet of Things.

While this slowdown in innovation has been widely recognized, marketers for smartphone vendors still trumpet their devices’ new features at large-scale events where the latest products are unveiled amid hype that overstates the new capabilities. Samsung, for example, hired a live orchestra to play on an elaborate stage for the launch of its Galaxy S5 smartphone at the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona in late February. The event was attended by thousands. The Galaxy S5 will ship April 11.

Tuesday’s launch of the expected HTC One M8 has been preceded by online videos and plenty of hype touting a phone that has a 5-in. full HD screen (larger than the one on last year’s HTC One), two rear camera sensors for taking better photos, a Snapdragon 801 processor and 3GB of RAM for greater speed.

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Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

 Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

Framingham, Mass. – March 24, 2014 – IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company comprising Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, CIO Executive Council, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—releases the findings from the 2014 Consumerization of IT in the Enterprise (CITE) research, highlighting the impact CITE adoption has on the enterprise; integration of cloud, apps and mobile device management; and the next wave of consumer technologies IT decision-makers need to consider.

CITE Adoption Results in New Policies and IT Purchases
The proliferation of personal devices being used for work purposes has required the majority of organizations (82%) to make changes, from creating policies on how corporate data can be shared and investing in mobile device management (MDM) solutions, to purchasing secure file sharing services. IT executives and their departments are leading the charge for integrating consumer devices into the organization. To support a culture of employees working in the office and at home, over the next two years more organizations will support employee owned smart phones and tablets and 83% of organizations will invest in mobile technologies. The approval of consumer devices in the workplace is well received by employees; CITE will have a positive impact on user satisfaction (69%), and user productivity (66%) over the next 12-18 months (check out the CITE infographic).

“Consumerization of IT in the enterprise has created significant digital disruption in the past year, and the opportunity to innovate continues with the introduction of new devices and services,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO, IDG Enterprise. “Organizations are working to mitigate risk and build security that enables employees and the businesses to use CITE technology to move the business into the digital era and create improved employee productivity and customer satisfaction.”

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