Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Facebook Reveals 10 Year Plan, Confident on Mobile

The Street

NEW YORK (TheStreet) - Facebook (FB_) CEO Mark Zuckerberg revealed the company’s thinking process around its three, five and ten year strategy in a conference call with analysts to explain the social network’s $2 billion acquisition of Oculus VR, a virtual reality platform that venture capital investors in the company compare to Silicon Valley’s biggest breakthroughs such as the Apple (AAPL_II, the iPhone, the Macintosh, Netscape and Google (GOOG_).

Investors puzzling over Facebook’s apparent entrance into virtual reality may be heartened by the clearer picture of the company’s medium-to-long-term thinking provided by CEO Zuckerberg. They also may be comforted by Zuckerberg’s increasing confidence that Facebook has solved its problems in bringing more than 1 billion monthly active users (MAUs) to mobile devices.

Those two developments, expressed on Tuesday evening in a call with analysts, may have more bearing on Facebook’s share price than the immediate impact of the Oculus VR acquisition. The company Facebook is acquiring is still in the process of developing its next generation product after using crowd-funding platform Kickstarter to raise $2.4 million to develop its first product, Oculus Rift.

While Facebook is shelling out $400 million in cash and $1.6 billion in stock for Oculus VR, in addition to an additional $300 million earn-out in cash and stock incentives, Oculus VR is unlikely to have any impact on the company’s earnings in the next few years.

On Tuesday, Facebook was unwilling to provide specific financial guidance on the acquisition or how it came upon a price, but CFO David Ebersman noted that the company focused on the games business because it’s the furthest along. It is worth noting no bankers were hired to advise Facebook’s acquisition, indicating CEO Mark Zuckerberg is confident he can be an effective dealmaker in Silicon Valley.

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Smartphone innovation is slowing, so what’s next?

Computerworld

In the last year or so, there has been a noticeable slowdown in innovations in new smartphones — with both hardware and software.

In a five-year smartphone forecast through 2018 released last week, research firm IDC noted: “It has been widely acknowledged that the pace of innovation on smartphones has slowed down, even reached a plateau. Indeed, many of the new innovations launched in 2013 appeared to be incremental improvements on a theme, and it was questionable whether many of them would have lasting value.”

With smartphone innovation flattening, the next direction seems to be making the smartphone the hub — connected via Bluetooth, primarily — to emerging technologies. These systems include smartwatches, other wearable devices and everything in the much larger ecosystem of home appliances, cars and other products that, when connected, would comprise what’s being called the Internet of Things.

While this slowdown in innovation has been widely recognized, marketers for smartphone vendors still trumpet their devices’ new features at large-scale events where the latest products are unveiled amid hype that overstates the new capabilities. Samsung, for example, hired a live orchestra to play on an elaborate stage for the launch of its Galaxy S5 smartphone at the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona in late February. The event was attended by thousands. The Galaxy S5 will ship April 11.

Tuesday’s launch of the expected HTC One M8 has been preceded by online videos and plenty of hype touting a phone that has a 5-in. full HD screen (larger than the one on last year’s HTC One), two rear camera sensors for taking better photos, a Snapdragon 801 processor and 3GB of RAM for greater speed.

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Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

 Consumerization of IT Continues to Cause Digital Disruption as New Technologies Enter the Market

Framingham, Mass. – March 24, 2014 – IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company comprising Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, CIO Executive Council, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—releases the findings from the 2014 Consumerization of IT in the Enterprise (CITE) research, highlighting the impact CITE adoption has on the enterprise; integration of cloud, apps and mobile device management; and the next wave of consumer technologies IT decision-makers need to consider.

CITE Adoption Results in New Policies and IT Purchases
The proliferation of personal devices being used for work purposes has required the majority of organizations (82%) to make changes, from creating policies on how corporate data can be shared and investing in mobile device management (MDM) solutions, to purchasing secure file sharing services. IT executives and their departments are leading the charge for integrating consumer devices into the organization. To support a culture of employees working in the office and at home, over the next two years more organizations will support employee owned smart phones and tablets and 83% of organizations will invest in mobile technologies. The approval of consumer devices in the workplace is well received by employees; CITE will have a positive impact on user satisfaction (69%), and user productivity (66%) over the next 12-18 months (check out the CITE infographic).

“Consumerization of IT in the enterprise has created significant digital disruption in the past year, and the opportunity to innovate continues with the introduction of new devices and services,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO, IDG Enterprise. “Organizations are working to mitigate risk and build security that enables employees and the businesses to use CITE technology to move the business into the digital era and create improved employee productivity and customer satisfaction.”

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World Tech Update- March 28, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week, Microsoft finally debuts Office for iPad, Facebook makes a big buy into virtual reality and NASA’s secret space plane breaks a record.

 

Innovation lessons from an industry pioneer

eMedia Vitals

Last week’s passing of Pat McGovern, founder of tech publisher IDG, feels like the end of an era. Over a span of five decades, McGovern brought a passionate spirit and a culture of innovation to B2B publishing – qualities that too often are absent from today’s B2B media companies.

I met with Pat a few times during my time at IDG from 2004 to 2006, and each interaction left an impression, similar to the times I spent with another tech publishing legend, Bill Ziff, who led IDG rival Ziff-Davis through the mid-1990s. Both were larger-than-life yet surprisingly humble leaders who balanced strong business instincts with a passion for journalism – and the people who produce it.

Here are three lessons B2B media leaders can (and should) take from McGovern’s approach to publishing.

Find & cultivate new markets

McGovern was a big thinker who saw great promise in emerging markets for technology news and information, not just in the U.S. but internationally. Just five years after launching Computerworld in the U.S. in 1967, McGovern launched Shukan Computer in Japan, kicking off a long string of global licensing deals and other partnerships that built IDG into a global powerhouse. In 1980, McGovern forged one of the first joint ventures in China by a U.S. business. In 1992, he established IDG Technology Ventures, one of the first venture capital firms in China.

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Box to go public, hoping to raise $250M

IDG News Service

IDG News Service (Miami Bureau) — Box, the eight-year-old company that has taken on industry giants to become a leader in cloud storage and file sharing, will seek to raise US$250 million by selling shares publicly for the first time.

The Los Altos, California, company announced on Monday that it had filed a registration statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission for a proposed IPO (initial public offering) of its common stock.

The company revealed in the filing that it has 25 million registered users, but it also says it has been losing money and might not post a profit for the foreseeable future.

Box has capitalized on the growing popularity among businesses of storing data in the cloud, where it can be accessed from a variety of devices including smartphones and tablets, giving employees more flexibility.

“Probably the biggest move in Box’s trajectory was the decision to focus exclusively on business users,” said Rob Koplowitz, an analyst at Forrester Research.

“That decision clarified their purpose and allowed them to be very direct and purposeful in hiring and technology investments. The strategy and platform they’ve been investing in will make or break them as an enterprise vendor,” he said.

In the filing, which runs for about 150 pages, the company disclosed that it has more than 34,000 paying corporate customers and 25 million registered users.

The paying customers include more than 40 percent of the Fortune 500 and 20 percent of Global 2000 companies, according to Box.

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Facebook takes mobile ad analytics in-house

VentureBeat

Facebook likes the mobile advertising space. So it’s getting ready to bite off an even bigger piece.

The Menlo Park, Calif. based social media kingpin is growing its in-house mobile analytic capabilities while at the same time working with the company’s roughly 13 mobile ad partners. It’s a two-pronged approach aimed at increasing Facebook’s clout and its access to data.

While Facebook says it doesn’t yet have the capability to totally rely on its own in-house analytics platforms, some say it’s only a matter of time until it cuts out the third parties.

“Advertisers are trying to cut out the middlemen, and mobile advertising is the frontier for this to happen. Facebook and Google are starting to allow advertisers to go directly to them,” said analyst Ray “R” Wang of Constellation Research.

The mobile ad market, and the third-party mobile analytic outfits that help marketers target their ads, is wide open and ripe for the taking. The space grew 105 percent in 2013 to a total of $17.9 billion, and research firm eMarketer expects that tally to grow to over $30 billion by the end of 2014.

Google currently dominates the market, accounting for nearly 50 percent of the mobile ad revenue haul, but Facebook is catching up fast, with 17.5 percent in 2013, rising to 21.7 percent in 2014, eMarketer says.

For its part, Facebook knows the future is mobile: It has over a billion mobile users, according to its latest quarterly earnings report, and more than half of last quarter’s $2.5 billion in revenue comes from mobile ads.

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Facebook Is Building A Massive New Business That Exploits A Key Weakness At Apple And Google

Business Insider

A long time ago, Facebook launched an app store. If you didn’t know that fact, don’t be alarmed. People don’t talk much about the Facebook App Center any more.

That’s because almost everyone downloads the apps they need from Apple’s App Store and the Google Play store on Android.

It’s a powerful duopoly, and everyone is used to it.

Apps and downloads are one of Apple’s fastest-growing, least-talked about businesses. They generate $4.4 billion per quarter, and are projected to be more profitable than iPads and Macs. Android and the Google Play store that supplies it run on up to 80% of smartphones in some markets.

Counterintuitively, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to regard Apple and Google’s dominance of app distribution as a weakness that he can now exploit.

The non-obvious chink in the armor is that while Apple and Google dominate the supply of apps — and take a cut of each paid download — they are lousy at promoting and marketing apps.

The marketplace for apps is surprisingly dysfunctional, given that all the players in it are self-described innovators and disruptors of dinosaur capitalism.

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Digital takes fifth of Spanish adspend

Warc

21 March 2014
MADRID: Advertising expenditure in digital media now accounts for 21% of all adspend in Spain where it has consolidated its second place behind television, new data has revealed.

IAB Spain, the trade body, said that investment in digital advertising during 2013 hadreached €878.4 million, of which by far the greatest proportion (94.8%) went on laptop and desktop advertising.

The remaining share was divided between mobile advertising (4.5%) and digital signage (0.7%).

Within the deskop/laptop segment, spending was down 3.1% on 2012 to €832.5 million. And the split between display and search was moving in favour of the latter and now stood at 40:60.

The three sectors investing most heavily in display remained automotive, telecommunications and finance, which together accounted for 34% of total investment, although telecoms was noted to be in long-term decline.

Mobile spending was growing fast, up 47.4% to €39.9 million and here display advertising was dominant, taking 70% of media investment.

Automotive and telecommunications again featured prominently among investors in mobile, taking 42% of the total between them, with beauty and hygiene a distant third on 4.9%.

Even though overall spending had not increased, Belén Acebes, IAB Spain Director of Marketing and Research, took a positive from the fact that digital expenditure was becoming increasingly important.

She also highlighted the first figures for programmatic buying which she said now accounted for 15.7% of all digital spending.

Her colleague Antonio Traugott, CEO of IAB Spain, drew attention to digital’s relatively stable performance compared to the decline of other media. Given the performances of mobile and digital signage he expected that 2014 would see the industry “progressively moving away from a flat line and into moderate growth”.

IDG’s Pat McGovern, 1937-2014: Computer Publishing’s Man of Many Worlds

Time

March 20, 2014

The owner of PC World, Macworld and other publications spent 50 years helping the world be smarter about technology.

Patrick J. McGovern died yesterday at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, California. You probably don’t know his name.

But if you’re interested enough in technology to read about it in print or online, there’s a very good chance that you know one or more of the publications produced by International Data Group, the privately-held company he founded in February, 1964 and ran for the rest of his life. They included PC WorldMacworld,GameProInfoWorld, the Dummies books and many, many more.

I worked at IDG for 16 years and eventually spent a fair amount of time in Pat’s company. It’s standard practice when someone passes away to describe that person as an unforgettable character, but trust me on this: Pat was unforgettable.

He was deeply interested in the human brain and how it worked, a pursuit he turned into a major philanthropic effort when he and his wife Lore pledged $350 million to create and fund MIT’sMcGovern Institute for Brain Research. I’m not sure if I ever completely understood how Pat’s own brain operated, but it was fascinating to watch it in action. He was a dreamer, but one with a prodigious ability to crunch numbers. (During board meetings, he often seemed to be recalculating spreadsheets about matters such as subscription revenues in his head.)

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