Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

FLURRY : SOURCE14

04/22/2014 San Francisco CA

Game Marketing Summit

04/23/2014 San Francisco CA

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

Digital Media

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

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News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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World Tech Update- April 10, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Microsoft ends support for Windows XP, Sony debuts a 4K point-and-shoot and we check out robots in Silicon Valley.

 

The Difference Between Google, Facebook And Microsoft Summed Up In Two Words: Augmentation Or Immersion

SF Gate

Over the last week the question of why Facebook would spend $2 billion buying Oculus Rift, a maker of virtual reality headsets has been asked repeatedly. In a world where wearable technology is generally seen as the next big thing, a pair of rather large VR goggles appears to run opposite to the approach taken by Google GOOG -2.94% and more recently Microsoft MSFT -2.15%.

Simply put, Google has taken a much more contextual approach to how it believes you and I will consume its services. It’s a strategy that sees a combination of ubiquitous mobile phones, wearable technology and globally available Internet, built upon a collection of web connected things. These things include Nest, a web connected Thermostat, Google Glass, a wearable heads up display of information and recently its  announcement of Android Wear, a version of the popular mobile OS tailored specifically for wearable tech products.  Adding to the mix are some of its ambitious R&D efforts like “Project Loon” which looks to use a global network of high-altitude balloons to connect people in rural and remote areas who have no Internet access.

Through these activities it seems Google’s strategy is to create contextual elements that augments your existing reality with data specifically tailored to you as you live your life. Or in other words, they are not looking to immerse you its world, so much as to help adapt and improve your existing world by adding to it. Combined with Google Now it’s a strategy that tries to anticipate what you need to know before you ask or even know what to ask.

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Yahoo reportedly launching YouTube rival

Computerworld

Reports are circulating that Yahoo is looking to launch a video site that would go up against Google’s behemoth YouTube.

The rumors largely stem from a Re/Code report late last week that cited anonymous sources saying Yahoo is looking to not only launch a YouTube competitor in the next few months but also is trying to pluck some of the video-sharing site’s stars and favorite networks.

A Yahoo spokeswoman declined to comment on the report.

However, Yahoo, and its CEO Marissa Mayer, have been trying to gain some traction in the online world, pulling the company back to the top where it started years ago. Yahoo was once an Internet pioneer but the years, and competitors like Google and Facebook, pushed the company back into the shadows.

Mayer, who was a top executive at Google before coming to Yahoo, wants to turn that slide around. Grabbing some of the audience from YouTube would be a huge step in making that happen.

“If Yahoo wants to be at the center of people’s entertainment, they need a video service,” said Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy. “YouTube is a free-for-all video service from cat videos to trailers to real content. Yahoo has a chance to provide less, but better content.”

Earlier this month, Mayer, speaking at the annual 4As conference, said she is focusing the company’s time and money on search, mail, mobile, social media and video.

There have been earlier signs that Yahoo wants to step up its presence in video. Last May, reports circulated that Yahoo was in talks to acquire Hulu, a video site known for streaming TV shows and movies, for as much as $800 million. The purchase never came through as Hulu’s owners canceled plans to sell the company.

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MOBILE VIDEO VIEWING INCREASED BY 700% BETWEEN 2011 AND 2013

Fast Company

TV is no longer just a box in the living room. Unless you haven’t been paying attention, you know it also includes smartphones and tablets, and a new report fromvideo services company Ooyala provides more evidence of that trend. By analyzing viewing data from 200 million people, the Global Video Index report found mobile and tablet viewing increased 719% from 2011 to 2013. In 2013 alone, the share of videos watched on mobile phones increased by 10 times.

The holiday season played a role in these shifting viewing habits. Not only were consumers watching product videos to learn about potential gifts, but many also received tablets and smartphones as presents, helping drive growth in December. Overall, mobile phones and tablets accounted for 26% of viewing by the end of December of 2013, up from 18% in October.

More than half of the time people spent watching on mobile devices was on videos that were 30 minutes or longer. However, it was connected TVs that engaged online viewers the longest, with 39% of people watching content more than an hour long.

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The latest publisher subscription model: memberships

Digiday

A digital media riddle for 2014: When is a subscription more than just a subscription? Answer: When it’s a membership.

In response to incredible shrinking ad revenue and mounting pressure to diversify their revenue streams, publishers are increasingly building out tertiary businesses like brand content studios and research products. But at a handful of niche outlets, publishers are experimenting with something more akin to the public radio model: more inclusive membership experiences for its most-avid readers.

Adherents of the membership model —  from the National Journal, The Guardian and tech blog Pando – claim memberships can both pull in more dollars and develop more engaged audiences. It is, they say, more than just a semantic variation on the subscription.

“Memberships are a fundamentally better way for us to serve our audience. We can start a dialogue with our audience and ask them what’s keeping them awake at night and give them solutions,” said Poppy MacDonald, publisher and co-president of National Journal, the Atlantic Media-owned magazine aimed at Washington insiders.

National Journal’s membership program, which it started three years ago, gives readers perks like weekly policy summaries, access to its policymaker database, and networking events for “modest four- to high-five-figure investment” a month. Reader response has been significant by itself, MacDonald said, but it’s also had ancillary effects on the National Journal’s existing subscription businesses: The magazine’s membership program has helped boost its formerly slumping magazine renewal rates to “well above” the 85 percent industry average.

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BUILD 2014 reveals the cloud side of Nadella’s Microsoft

CITEworld

Satya Nadella’s Microsoft is all about “mobile and the cloud,” a more nuanced view of what it means to be a devices and services business. So if day one of its BUILD developer conference was all about the mobile, it’s not surprising that day two was all about the cloud — with Cloud and Server chief Scott Guthrie making 44 separate announcements about Azure in the course of his keynote.

Microsoft’s Azure cloud service has been the driver for much of the company’s recent innovation, with its mix of infrastructure and platform features. Working with Azure has meant working with its web portal every time you wanted to create new virtual machines. Microsoft is streamlining the process for developers, so you can now create a virtual machine straight from Visual Studio. You can also manage your existing VMs, and even remotely debug apps running across devices and the cloud.

Increased automation makes Azure, and the cloud as a whole, more palatable to IT departments. With support for Puppet and Chef, you’re now able to automate configuration management across a flexible fabric of virtual servers. By adding open configuration management tooling to Azure Microsoft is making its cloud surprisingly portable — you can take those configurations and use the same tools to deploy them on other, competing, infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) clouds. Microsoft is also using its own tooling to simplify defining and provisioning virtual servers, with its PowerShell scripting environment now supporting a JSON-based template language that can be used to deploy not just servers and applications, but also the low level connections that form the foundations of a cloud application.

Azure’s web platform is perhaps the most visible element of its Platform as a Service (Paas) aspect. It’s now able to autoscale web sites, helping your apps keep online as loads fluctuate. There’s also support for a new Webjobs role, which offloads work to background threads running in any supported language, and tools for handling traffic across Azure’s global network of data centers. You can now also use Azure as a development platform for web applications, with private staging sites that can be swapped for live sites at a click of a button.

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What went wrong at Digital First Media — and what’s next?

Poynter

The announced shutdown of Digital First Media’s national newsroomWednesday and the probable sale of its 75 daily newspapers later this year is a significant jolt to those who believe a viable business model for rapid transformation of legacy operations is close at hand.

CEO John Paton’s explanation in his blog that the company has decided to dismantle Project Thunderdome “to go in a new direction” barely hints at the converging economic troubles.

Most basically, the very able editor Jim Brady (a Poynter National Advisory Board member) and his lieutenants were like a crack auto racing team trying to succeed in a highly competitive field driving Chevy Cobalts.

The two companies that were merged into Digital First, Journal Register and MediaNews, have both been through bankruptcies, Journal Register twice. Both had been under-invested for years in content management systems and other essential technology.

Steve Buttry, who was just months into “Project Unbolt” to hasten the break from print habits to digital, told me the four pilot papers for that project all had different CMSes, none of them especially good.

It is myth, embraced by digital future-of-news enthusiasts, that Web publishing is close to free. Paton seemed of that view early in his tenure when he asked newsrooms to use mainly free tools to put out their reports for a week.

But in his most recent manifesto/speech to the Online Publishers Association in January, he said he was looking for another $100 million to invest in the company’s digital activities on top of an earlier $100 million.

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A Call for Digital Content Standards

IDG Connect 0811 A Call for Digital Content Standards

IT buyer frustration with finding the right marketing content to make informed purchase decisions is of great concern. Irrelevant content is a reality to a degree, but when buyers have to unnecessarily consume it because its title or description is unclear, general, or positioning fluff, it adds length to their decision timelines. For vendors, our voice of the buyer research continues to show that such low relevance is a big barrier to inclusion among a shortlist of finalists. Content creators must clarify the potential relevance of any given asset up front by giving each one some profile information for quick consideration by buyers and/or systems.

Without the ability to pre-judge a piece of content, buyers will be forced to waste more and more time wading through assets that don’t help, which adds over 20% to the time it takes to make decisions.   Want evidence? Only five years ago, buyers found relevant content about fifty percent of the time. New IDG Connect research of enterprise buyers within the US reveals the relevance hovers just over forty percent and it adds about 3.5 weeks to the buying cycle. Add on that buyers want to self-search and are busy and impatient and one thing is clear: vendors, agencies and media organizations must take more responsibility to speed the process of how one confirms the degree of relevance of a piece of content without requiring its consumption to do so. That process of force feeding is simply unfair.

IDG Connect proposes standards around how digital content is cataloged and profile information is shared with buyers and automated systems to speed getting relevant content to those who need it most. A content identification method can be simple and powerful to help increase the value of offered content.

The need is all about unintelligent assets. Beyond a clever title, they carry little that identifies them by audience, buying stage or the recently minted term persona.  Here is how we can do this.

Document-based assets should have a given location that lists its profile attributes. Rich media should do the same through abstract or description information that are attached to audio, video, tools or games. Your identification tag does not have to be like those of every other vendor. In fact, you choose attributes from among many to label the asset. You do this based on how you segment your audience and look for those attributes that will be most helpful. The ultimate number offered will be driven by the product or service, its complexity, the audience and asset scope. Here are some examples where I’ve defined the attribute for example purposes:

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How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts

The Atlantic

It’s been eight years since Twitter debuted. Like the rest of the social networks that have survived, it has changed, both in response to user and commercial demands. The user interface, application ecosystem, geographical distribution, and culture not what they were in 2010, let alone 2006.

But each Twitter user sees the service through his or her own tiny window of followers and followed. It’s hard to tell if everyone’s behavior is changing, or just that of one’s subset of the social network. Now, new research from Yabing Liu and Alan Mislove of Northeastern with Brown’s Chloe Kliman-Silverattempts to quantify the way tweeting has changed through the years.

“Twitter is known to have evolved significantly since its founding,” they write, “And it remains unclear how much the user base and behavior has evolved, whether prior results still hold, and whether the (often implicit) assumptions of proposed systems are still valid.”

While their paper is directed at fellow researchers, their results might be of interest to anyone whose ever used Twitter. They combined three datasets to come up with 37 billion tweets from March of 2006 until the end of 2013. The key thing to know is that they talk about two different datasets: What they call the “crawl” dataset constitutes all the tweets, and what they call the “gardenhose” dataset constitutes only a sample of either 15 percent of all tweets (until July 2010) or 10 percent of all tweets (after July 2010).

OK, with that caveat, here are some of their most interesting findings.

Click to see charts and continue reading 

Late to the enterprise mobility party, Microsoft arrives with big plans

CITEworld

After last week’s launch of Office for iPad, the announcement of the Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility Suite, and the news from the company’s BUILD conference this week, it seems that Microsoft has finally gotten to the enterprise mobility party in terms of devices and in terms of infrastructure.

With Windows Phone 8.1, the company is finally building a range of enterprise security and management capabilities into its mobile platform. Microsoft is also making it easier for developers to write code that crosses all of its platforms, something that’s useful for consumer, business, and enterprise app development.

While most of the focus this week has been on devices and developer resources, Microsoft is also making some powerful plays in terms of enterprise mobility infrastructure. When I spoke with Microsoft vice president Brad Anderson back in January, it was clear that Microsoft had high aspirations in terms of entering the enterprise mobility space. At the time, Intune’s mobile management capabilities were far from complete  – and, for iOS and Android, they still are below the benchmarks of many EMM vendors at this point. But it was clear that Microsoft was going to be making rapid improvements and expanding the scope of its capabilities.

The scale of that strategy came into focus as Satya Nadella announced Office for iPad alongside a new vision of Microsoft as a “mobile-first and cloud-first company.”

The Enterprise Mobility Suite builds together a range of technologies that are likely to add up to being more than the sum of their parts.

The suite builds on the multi-platform mobile management capabilities that Microsoft began implementing last year and advanced in January. Those capabilities, part of the company’s  Intune cloud-based device management solution, included support for managing iOS and Android devices in addition to devices running various flavors of Windows.

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