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New Approaches to Video From Four Digital Leaders

Source: The Media Briefing

If you’ve been paying attention to recent media industry coverage, then you may have been distracted by all this chatter around Facebook Instant.

However, there’s also a much larger tectonic shift happening on the Facebook platform, one that’s not just impacting a tiny pilot group of elite publishers like the Instant experiment: Facebook is pushing video content like crazy.

There are two things going on here.

1)   Facebook is favouring video uploaded through its native player

A Business Insider article claims the social network’s algorithm prioritises videos to make up 30% of the News Feed. And Facebook itself has shared that users are seeing 3.6 times more video compared with one year ago.

2)   Publishers and brands are responding by uploading record amounts of video to Facebook, and getting record engagement.

Liam Corcoran at NewsWhip, a social analytics firm, told me that “average share rates on Facebook native videos are far higher than those of other types of Facebook posts, such as Links and Images.”

Corcoran took the example of BBC News’ Facebook page, where “average share rates per video were over four times higher than those for external links”.

But it’s not just Facebook

Facebook isn’t the only force impacting publishers’ video strategies: newer platforms like Instagram, Snapchat, and Vine are already the focus of much experimentation around new video formats. And of course there’s the continued growth in views and uploads on YouTube, which is still a vital platform for most media.

The one constant across all these platforms is the growing consumption of video on mobile – Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said 75% of the network’s 4 billion daily video views come from mobile devices.

In need of a better way

Therefore, the current state of video for publishers is this:

The distribution channels and consumption habits are evolving rapidly, and a new approach to video is required. One that caters to a mobile, social audience, and involves a healthy amount of experimentation around new formats and more efficient workflows.

I spoke to some global leaders in the space, to find out what they consider as the new approach to video. Here’s a selection of key quotes:

Jigar Mehta (@jigarmehta), Engagement Lead at AJ + (USA)

  • When we produce video for Facebook, we have to assume that the audience is going to be watching on their mobile phones with no sound, so we have to optimize video to tell the story with no sound.
  • On Facebook, we know that we are competing for time on a platform where content FOMO [fear of missing out] is rampant, so we strive to make our videos very engaging from the start, and not waste any time getting straight into the stories we tell.

  • We are always thinking about how we can get as much information across and tell the stories we need to tell in the shortest amount of time possible, while still being engaging.

Sven Christian (@sven_christian), Head of Video at Spiegel Online (Germany)

[Disclosure, Spiegel Online is a user of the wochit video creation platform]

  • Our emphasis is on scenes, sound bites, and atmospheres. We show, don’t tell!
  • So we use as little comment as possible, instead utilising bullet points to answer the basic questions: who does what where when and try to explain why.
  • Video has the power to transport information quicker and closer to the viewer than text. But text can explain things more deeply. Fortunately I work with fantastic writers: we can show, they can tell.

 

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Video Will Dominate Mobile Usage by 2020

Source: MediaPost

The number of smartphones in use around the world will more than double over the next five years, from 2.6 billion in 2014 to 6.1 billion in 2020, according to a new forecast from network equipment manufacturer Ericsson. That means around 70% of the world’s population will have a smartphone by the latter date, with the bulk of  new mobile subscriptions (two billion) located in the Asia-Pacific region, and another 750 million in the Middle East and Africa.

Meanwhile the total number of connected devices of all kinds, including wearable devices, will soar to 26 billion worldwide over the same period. Mobile handset subscriptions of all kinds (including non-smartphones) will increase from 7.1 billion in 2014 to 9.2 billion in 2020.

Ericsson also predicts that by 2020, 90% of the world population will have access to mobile broadband networks, causing mobile data usage to soar. Worldwide smartphone data usage will increase fivefold, from one gigabyte per month in 2014 to 4.9 gigabytes in 2020, when smartphones will account for 80% of all global mobile data usage. Overall two out of three dollars spent on Internet services will go to mobile access rather than landline services five years from now.

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DATA DRIVEN AND DIGITALLY SAVVY: THE RISE OF THE NEW MARKETING ORGANIZATION

Source: Forbes Insights

For marketers, the digitization of business has opened up a new world. No longer are they forced to launch campaigns while blindly relying on gut instinct and hoping for the best. Marketing and advertising campaigns that succeed do so by integrating a range of intelligent approaches to identify customers, segment, measure results, analyze data and build upon feedback in real time.

In today’s global economy, there is a great urgency to be able to conduct data-driven marketing campaigns, as organizations are under pressure as never before to deliver results. “Data-driven marketing” is the practice of employing data to achieve marketing goals and measure results, through engaging customers and delivering greater value to the business. This builds upon a number of forces, such as increasingly digitized operations and increasingly demanding and digitally connected customers.

Data insights have long played a role in efforts to drive business growth and reach new and existing customers. Insights generated by customer and transaction data have helped answer the four w’s of marketing—who, when, where and what, says Dr. Ravi Dhar, professor of management and marketing, and director of the Center for Customer Insights at the Yale School of Management. “It’s always been about who buys it, when did they buy it, where did they buy it, and what did they buy.” The challenge is now to answer the fifth “w” question—why. To correlate data to the “why,” information needs to be brought together from across the enterprise and market landscape to be transformed into actionable insights. “This is really critical to making good decisions, but the data can’t tell you the ‘why’ by itself. You need good managerial understanding to be able to answer the ‘why.’”

Data-driven marketing opens up a wealth of new perspectives and opportunities for businesses, and ultimately, it’s all about customers. A successful data-driven effort needs to be accompanied by efforts to listen to and engage with customers. Datadriven marketing is customer-centric marketing.

Businesses are only just starting to understand the power and potential of data-driven marketing. Ultimately, a data-driven organization learns to employ data analytics as part of all marketing campaigns, from conception to post-campaign review. Within a data-driven enterprise, information can move freely and is consistent across all channels. Within organizations that have achieved high levels of customer intelligence, there is a data-centric culture that is supported from the top down, and decision makers at all levels are provided training and support in mastering the power of data to better reach their markets.

“There’s really very little excuse in today’s marketing department to not use data,” says Russell Glass, head of B2B product for LinkedIn, and coauthor of The Big Data-Driven Business (Wiley). “With the cost of processing, storage and tools having gone down so much, if you’re not using data to make your decisions, or at least to inform your decisions, you’re probably not doing your job.”

Check out the full PDF…

Explosive Internet of Things Spending to Reach $1.7 Trillion in 2020, According to IDC

Screen Shot 2015 05 26 at 2.20.01 PM Explosive Internet of Things Spending to Reach $1.7 Trillion in 2020, According to IDC

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., June 2, 2015 – The Internet of Things (IoT) continues to gain momentum as vendors and enterprises begin to embrace the opportunities this market presents. According to new research from International Data Corporation (IDC), the worldwide Internet of Things market will grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020 with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%.

Devices, connectivity, and IT services will make up the majority of the IoT market in 2020. Together, they are estimated to account for over two-thirds of the worldwide IoT market in 2020, with devices (modules/sensors) alone representing 31.8% of the total. By 2020, IDC expects that IoT purpose-built platforms, application software, and “as a service” offerings will capture a larger percentage of revenue.

The new forecast is one of three recently completed reports defining the IoT market and identifying opportunities: IDC’s Worldwide Internet of Things Taxonomy, 2015, Worldwide Internet of Things Forecast, 2015–2020, and the Worldwide IoT Spending Guide by Vertical. IDC’s IoT taxonomy includes a view to the horizontal technology stack of hardware, software, services, and connectivity as well as a vertical view to the industries and use cases that IDC is forecasting in the IoT market. IDC’s IoT forecast provides includes the installed base by region as well as revenue projections from both a regional and technology perspective. The IoT Spending Guide focuses on 25 of the fastest growing IoT use cases in 11 vertical industries, including consumer, retail, healthcare, government, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, while also sizing IoT opportunities across the technology stack.

“While wearable devices are the consumer face of the Internet of Things, and where recognition of IoT appears to begin, the real opportunity remains in the enterprise and public sector markets,” said Vernon Turner, senior vice president and research fellow (IoT), Enterprise Systems. “The ripple effect of IoT is driving traditional business models from IT-enabled business processes to IT-enabled services and finally to IT-enabled products, which is beginning to disrupt the IT status quo.”

IDC defines the IoT as a network of networks of uniquely identifiable endpoints (or “things”) that communicate without human interaction using IP connectivity. IDC has identified the IoT ecosystem as containing a complex mix of technologies including, but not limited to, modules/devices, connectivity, IoT purpose-built platforms, storage, servers, security, analytics software, IT services, and security. It is important to note that autonomous connectivity is a key attribute within IDC’s definition and, at this point, we do not count smartphones, tablets, or PCs within our IoT forecast.

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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

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IDG Communications Launches ABM360™ for Comprehensive Account-Based Marketing

Business Wire

–World’s Leading Tech Media, Data and Services Company Will Provide Sophisticated Lead Generation, Engagement and Targeting Solutions for BtoB Marketers–

IDG Communications today announced the launch of ABM360, a powerful suite of account-based marketing solutions. ABM360 combines IDG’s industry-leading knowledge of the BtoB technology buying cycle with IDG’s 1st party intent data, account-based media, demand generation and marketing services to enable marketers to identify purchasing intent at the company and decision maker level.

Technology marketers continue to be challenged by delivering the right message, at the right time, to the right buyer. ABM360 is the only truly global account-based marketing solution that leverages digital display, demand generation, and data solutions to help marketers identify purchasing intent.

“Mediacom has already come to rely upon IDG’s ABM solutions as an integral part of our clients’ campaigns,” said LaShena Huddleston, Media Director, Mediacom. “We’ve run dozens of campaigns using these tools, and they have proven to deliver a winning combination of innovation and most importantly, results.”

ABM360 reflects IDG’s core capabilities across all facets of technology marketing. By combining IDG’s 1st party personal and contextual data with its demand generation, media, and creative services, ABM360 gives marketers unprecedented global access to the companies and decision makers that matter most.

“IDG’s focus on delivering results has been a game-changer for HP Fortify,” said Majken Pullin, Americas Security Campaign Manager at Hewlett-Packard. “Our use of IDG Sonar, a component of ABM360, shows us that IDG understands the technology industry and buyer intent better than anyone.”

The comprehensive solutions in the ABM360 suite include:

  • Target Account Media – A media targeting solution that helps reach account lists at scale to drive awareness and interest
  • High Intent Media – A solution that applies intelligence to surround high intent accounts with targeted media
  • Creative Personalization – A creative solution that drives better engagement through the use of media that dynamically personalizes based on company data
  • Target Account Lead Generation – A lead generation solution that helps marketers focus on only the accounts with the greatest potential for their business
  • IDG Sonar– A data-enhanced demand generation program which provides actionable sales intelligence at the company and individual decision-maker levels. Sonar intelligence derives intent from IDG’s 1st party data combined with 3rd party data and validates that intent with a BANT-style qualification
  • Deep Media Nurturing – A content marketing program that uses highly-targeted, personalized media to nurture individuals through the purchasing cycle

“IDG knows the technology purchase process better than anyone,” said Michael Friedenberg, CEO, IDG Communications. “This expertise led us to create a suite of ABM products that specifically helps technology marketers identify company purchasing behavior and the people driving these decisions. IDG is the only company to leverage digital display, data and demand generation on a global basis to unlock revenue for marketers and deliver real ROI.”

In the coming months, IDG will be layering new products into the ABM360 suite that leverage predictive analytics and additional advanced data segments.

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For more detail on IDG’s ABM360, click here.

Screen Shot 2015 06 15 at 11.15.37 AM IDG Communications Launches ABM360™ for Comprehensive Account Based Marketing

IDG.tv to Unify Global Video Content

Yahoo! Finance

IDG Communications today announced strategic enhancements that will allow IDG.tv to give marketers unprecedented video reach, distribution and targeting in 97 countries and provide even more compelling video content to its audiences.

The company is unifying all of its video content from its tech media properties on a global basis, and recently launched IDG Studios, creating core content for its channels as well as original, episodic programming on IDG.tv for both enterprise and consumer technology audiences.

According to comScore Video Metrix, IDG was the #1 tech property in video in March 2015 with 9.93 million total unique viewers, thanks to its trusted and engaging insights, analysis and reviews from premium trusted media brands including CIO, NetworkWorld, MacWorld, PCWorld and outpacing its the nearest competitor AOL Tech by over 3.5 million unique viewers.

“IDG is a global, tech video content and distribution powerhouse. Our premium owned and operated brands and the broad reach of IDG TechNetwork, is a winning combination,” said Dina Roman, General Manager, IDG.tv. “Add to that a slate of original programming that offers unique sponsorships for marketers, and a unified, scaled global distribution platform that we can curate and control, IDG continues to provide a wide variety of targeting opportunities across an affluent, tech-savvy audience.”

As part of its new unified content strategy, IDG.tv will offer a consistent video programming calendar, with seasonal consumer and technology event-based themes, across all of its properties as well as on more than 500 sites in the IDG TechNetwork. IDG Studios’ new and original episodic programming will include original content for viewers, such as Hardcore HardwareBreakout Startups and WorldTech Update, as well as custom editorial series created on behalf of some of the world’s largest technology marketers.

Kyle Kramer, a proven digital video expert, was recruited from Vox Media to serve as IDG’s VP of Video Programming. Kramer served as Head of Production at Vox Media where he oversaw studio operations and award-winning production for all Vox Media properties, including The Verge, Polygon, SB Nation, Eater, Racked, Curbed & Vox.

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IDC: Industry Adoption of 3rd Platform Technologies Drive China’s ICT Markets

IDC PMS4colorversion  IDC: Industry Adoption of 3rd Platform Technologies Drive China’s ICT Markets

Shenzhen, April 24 2015 –2015 is the year of deepening reform, the last year of the “12th Five-Year Plan”, and the inaugural year of the “13th Five-Year Plan”. The policies and initiatives set by the Chinese government will have a tremendous impact on China’s economic development and global technology markets in the future. Amidst this macro situation, International Data Corporation (IDC) highlighted the key enterprise and consumer technology trends of the global and China’s ICT markets at IDC 2015 ICT Directions Conference in Shenzhen today. The roadshow will continue in Beijing (May 13), Shanghai (May 20), Guiyang (May 27) and end in Dalian (June 17). What are the key trends of the 3rd Platform supporting and accelerating technology and business innovation?  Below are some highlights from IDC 2015 ICT Directions event:

 

  • Everyone Needs an IoT Business Plan

The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly becoming reality for every business, as it enables new business models, creates low barriers to entry for competitors, and drives disruption in product development, while challenging the security and value of corporate data. According to Vernon Turner, Senior Vice President, Enterprise Infrastructure, Consumer, Network, Telecom and Sustainability Research (IDC), “ICT suppliers must align their traditional IT product road maps to include nontraditional markets in industry, government, and consumer.  Critical information and emerging industry standards must be shared to better develop supply chains, security data basis and predictive outcomes. Business outcomes will be driven by better connected IoT business plans shared by technology partners and their customers.”

 

 

  • The Next Wave of Mobile Devices

As mobility continues to change the way day-to-day activities are performed, so do the devices in which we interact with. According to Ryan Reith, Program Director, IDC’s WW Mobile Device Trackers (IDC), “As devices used for work and pleasure all migrate towards a more mobile world, device OEMs, IT buyers, consumers, and industry affiliates are all struggling to understand which form factor and platform will win out.”  The current landscape of consumer devices includes shifting dynamics within consumer buying trends, product pricing, platform wars, and hardware aesthetics for PC’s, tablets, detachables, smartphones, and wearables.

 

  • New Business Processes Drive New Workloads in the Digital Enterprise

According to Matt Eastwood, Group Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Platforms (IDC), “The 3rd Platform brings new technologies together, while at the same time creating a perfect storm for business leaders looking to compete effectively in the market. Digital transformation is creating new workloads as organizations leverage mobile, social, cloud, and analytics to enhance customer engagement and improve business decision making. IDC believes that many companies will need to develop entirely new technology infrastructures with radical impacts on the IT department as well as the datacenter.” According to Matt Eastwood, Group Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Platforms (IDC), “The 3rd Platform brings new technologies together, while at the same time creating a perfect storm for business leaders looking to compete effectively in the market. Digital transformation is creating new workloads as organizations leverage mobile, social, cloud, and analytics to enhance customer engagement and improve business decision making. IDC believes that many companies will need to develop entirely new technology infrastructures with radical impacts on the IT department as well as the datacenter.”

 

  • European Telecom Operators Must Capitalize on 3rd Platform Opportunities

According to Eric Owen, Group Vice President, EMEA Telecommunications & Networking Research (IDC), “The connectivity market in Europe has been in decline for several years now. However, as the ICT industry consolidates around the 3rd Platform, telecom operators are examining the opportunities this offers them in markets beyond connectivity.  Operators are looking at markets such as Cloud, Datacenter, Security and Mobility services to figure out where they can effectively compete.” Telecom operators cannot do this on their own and will need help from partners if they are to be successful in their transformation and their quest for revenue growth once again.

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The Transformation Equation

 The Transformation Equation

Digital business initiatives are illuminating the value of the enterprise infrastructure. At the same time, these business demands are increasing the pace at which IT must deploy new capabilities. In order to deliver, IT has to transform itself. The Transformation Equation explores how Enterprise IT is responding to this digital disruption. According to Network World’s 2015 State of the Network Survey, Network IT is already changing: 60% of technology and business professionals agree that collaborative teams are taking control of the network, especially at large companies.

Screen Shot 2015 05 18 at 12.01.12 PM 232x300 The Transformation Equation

This white paper will:

  • Provide a better understanding of how IT decision-makers are responding to digital disruption through integrating emerging technologies.
  • Present an in-depth look at the enterprise IT agenda, from cloud computing to mobile and security.
  • Show how software-defined networking (SDN) can add flexibility to the network.

Download the full white paper here

Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

IDG Connect 0811 Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

This is a contributed piece from Eneas Bernardo, Managing Director Brazil, RED

This article is the story of a conflict, between what the Millennial generation of IT staff is expecting, and what the business environment is demanding. It’s about what’s happening in Brazil – but it applies to some extent everywhere in the world.

Does IT matter?

The story starts a few years ago in 2003, when, in an article, Nicholas Carr stated, “IT doesn’t matter”. With this statement, Carr threw cold water over the industry. His article brought to light the darkest fear of the IT sector: that rather than be recognized as a business advantage, it was being seen mostly as a cost.

This fear had already been felt to some extent by the ‘mainframe generation’, also known as baby boomers. It might have been sensed, and probably ignored, by their younger cousins, the ‘Downsizers’ or ‘Generation X’.

But the youngest generation in the workforce, the ‘Netties’ or ‘Generation Y’, had grown up in a world where IT was all around and to them it was ever-present. Regardless of Carr’s predictions, IT continued to play a key role, at least for the time being.

Increasing pressures

Moving forward to the next scene in our story, we see the pressure over IT projects increasing on staff. And, as they struggle to gain the elusive benefits of IT that they still believe are there, many companies are spending more and more money on ERP and other buzzwords that promised competitive advantage and best practices – and the gold ticket for growth and profitability.

Cut to the next scene: the global financial crisis of the 2000s and 2010s. To respond, organisations kicked off a desperate pursuit for cost cutting, and strove to innovate in order to survive – let alone be profitable.

What it means for staff

What’s been the impact on staff of these recent trends?

With unemployment at the highest rates since the great depression, there are also more people to educate, more people to feed, and more people to employ. At the same time, businesses are looking for fewer employees.

Business targets and plans are also piling on the pressure. Projects are shortened, costs are reviewed, and staffing is reduced – so the people who remain need to handle more and more duties. Staff must take on more projects, deliverables and targets. They need to handle quality assurance, to consider new issues such as sustainability, and to evaluate information and data coming from many sources such as financials, manufacturing, human resources, customer relationship management and the supply chain.

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