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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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4 Media Types Every Marketer and PR Professional Needs

Heidi Cohen

Media is a key element of any marketing or PR plan. Marketers and PR professionals monitor, create and place content and their messages via different media types in order to expand their audience reach to attract and convert prospects.

Due to technology and the dynamic nature of online communications, media has evolved. As a result, how you use the different types of marketing media to achieve your goals and reap measurable results has changed.

 

4 Key types of media

In today’s information landscape, 4 key marketing media types have emerged. All 4 key types of media are critical to reaching your maximum potential target market and persuading prospects and retaining customers and fans. (BTW: (Here’s a snapshot of how we consume content and media.)

4 Key Types of Media Heidi Cohen Actionable Marketing Guide 4 Media Types Every Marketer and PR Professional Needs

1. Owned media

Includes all of the content and information you publish on platforms you own regardless of whether you’re an individual or an organization. It’s at the heart of content marketing (and here are 35 tactics to improve your content marketing). Here’s an example from Gini Dietrich’s Spin Sucks.

Key marketing characteristics of owned media:

  • Full control and discretion over content published. You decide what, when and how to publish your content.
  • Extends your own brand. This is critical reason to build and distribute content marketing on your own platforms. If you publish your content elsewhere first, ensure that you retain permission to post it on your own website later.
  • Tends to have a smaller reach, especially compared to third party media, unless you’re an influencer or a top brand. Build your housefile to ensure that you can contact your prospects and audience if other options are closed for reasons beyond your control.
  • Encompasses any information your organization creates. This includes website, blog, catalog, email newsletters, magazines, product manuals, employee handbooks and investor relations.

Communications direction:

  • Either one-to-many or one-to-one. They generally go from the media owner to individuals who’ve agreed to receive them, customers, employees, investors and the public.

 

Continue Reading…

 

5 Words That Will Kill Your Blog

UnMarketing

You’ve done the hardest parts of writing a blog post: Gotten the reader to your site, evoked a strong enough emotion to make them feel they need to add to the discussion and leave a comment, and they submit it and see this:

“Your comment is awaiting moderation”

“Your comment is awaiting approval”

“You need to register first”

Congratulations, you’ve just halted the conversation on your post.

For the most part, moderation is used to stop spam from appearing not necessarily to censor comments, but you’re hurting the voice of the very people that can be your biggest evangelists.

There are many issues with this:

  1. When a commenter sees those five words and has to wait for approval, it will stop them from spreading the post until it has been approved
  2. 99% of the time the commenter doesn’t get a notification that the comment has been approved, and so never spreads the original post at all.
  3. The flow of comments is dictated by the blog owners ability to approve comments in a timely fashion.
  4. As soon as a commenter sees that their original comment is awaiting moderation, they will hesitate to comment on anyone else’s comment in the thread.
  5. The commenter doesn’t know if it’s awaiting approval for being a non-spam comment, or that the blog owner is only allowing positive comments.

If the spam issue is your main reason for moderating blog comments, there are a few quick fixes.

  1. Install the Askimet plugin. This well-known, and free for personal use tool is amazing for filtering out spam comments. I average 100+ comments per post, and have only ever had to delete one spam comment that made it past Askimet’s filter.
  2. Use a comment management system like Disqus. That’s the system I use here. It allows threaded comments, meaning I or others can reply in-line to a comment and it makes it linked as a conversation, including emailing the original commenter that someone has replied, so they can return and continue the engagement. It also emails me every time someone comments, and I can reply on my Blackberry in the email, and it will post it as a comment. Not to mention if a spam comment slips through (or a troll) I just reply to the email with “delete” and it’s gone instantly.

There are some valid reasons to moderate comments, such as very sensitive topic-based sites (especially religion, politics, parents against Justin Bieber) and also large corporate blogs that have certain topics that bring out the “special” folks of the world.

But for the most part I see moderation being done on the very blogs that need comments: the ones that don’t have many at all. Especially when you’re starting out, let the conversation flow. Create community and engagement. The comments on my posts are 10X better than my original post. Why would I want to stifle that?

Continue Reading…

Internet of Things connections to quadruple by 2020

CiteWorld

Here in 2015, the Internet of Things (IoT) is already having a massive effect on business, according to a recent report by Verizon, and by 2025 it predicts best-in-class organizations that use IoT extensively will be up to 10 percent more profitable than they are today.

“We see the Internet of Things as an extension of our machine-to-machine business, as does everyone else in the marketplace today,” says Mark Bartolomeo, vice president of IoT Connected Solutions at Verizon. “When you think about machine-to-machine, what you’re really looking at is connecting devices and collecting data from those devices. The next big leap for IoT is really about the use case. IoT is about interconnecting these devices for specific use cases and deriving value from the data.”

On the road with IoT

For instance, transportation companies are using data to reduce fuel consumption, while local governments are turning to smart LED street lighting that doesn’t need regular maintenance but automatically reports when it needs repairs. Utilities are deploying smart meters that provide more granular data on energy usage while minimizing or eliminating the need for home visits.
One highly recognizable example of IoT in action is the way automotive insurers have begun setting premiums for commercial and fleet customers though usage-based insurance (UBI). Rather than rely on broad indicators like the driver’s age and gender, these insurers are installing devices in the users’ vehicles. These devices can track how many miles a driver drives in a year, when and where they take their trips and how safely they drive. With this data, insurers can align their premiums against measured risk.

Bartolomeo is quick to note that while machine-to-machine technologies have been around for some time, the game-changer is the way new IoT technologies are reducing the complexity of deployment. After all, machine-to-machine technology is just a first step toward IoT. To complete the IoT circuit, machine-to-machine technology must be enabled by secure network connectivity and cloud infrastructure that can transform the data generated into information and insight for people, businesses and institutions.

Continue Reading…

 

Ready or Not, the Internet of Things Is Coming

eMarketer

Think the net neutrality debate is all about streaming videos? Think again. It’s actually much more than that: It’s about streaming your life. Internet connectivity might seem ubiquitous today, between the use of PCs, mobile devices, and smart TVs, but there are major swaths of daily life that aren’t connected yet that soon will become so, such as homes and cars, according to a new eMarketer report, “Key Digital Trends for Midyear 2014: The Internet of Things, Net Neutrality, and Why Marketers Need to Care.”

Connecting all the unconnected devices, machines and systems will involve vast numbers of new internet-enabled objects and large sums of money. In a relatively untapped market with seemingly limitless potential, forecasts tend toward the sky-high:

  • International Data Corporation predicts the worldwide market for “internet of things” (IoT) solutions will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020.
  • MarketsandMarkets gives the IoT market a more conservative—but still lofty—valuation of $1.029 trillion in 2013, increasing to $1.423 trillion by 2020.
  • Gartner forecasts 26 billion connected objects worldwide by 2020 (a figure that does not include PCs, smartphones and tablets).
  • IDATE projects 80 billion internet-connected things in 2020, up from 15 billion in 2012. This figure does include PCs, TVs and smart devices, but the vast majority (85%) will be objects like car tires or shipping pallets that may communicate with the web via an intermediate device. Devices that communicate directly, such as PCs, TVs and mobile phones, will make up 11% of the total in 2020.
  • Cisco Systems predicts 50 billion things will be connected by 2022, yielding $19 trillion in new revenues ($14.4 trillion of which will accrue to private-sector corporations).

“There’s no doubt the world is moving toward a more connected future, but the speed with which consumers and enterprises make the transition to the internet of things is still to be determined,” said Noah Elkin, executive editor at eMarketer. “The timing of adoption will determine just how much money and how many things are involved.”

Continue Reading…

How to build audiences with single-subject news products

American Press Institute

As audiences gain more choices for news, they are increasingly turning to specialized sources. That represents a challenge to general-interest publishers but also creates an opportunity to reach new audiences by being the best source on a particular topic.

Topic, not demographics or habits, is now the biggest factor determining where people turn for news. Convenience also matters. These are among the most important findings from the Personal News Cycle research API has conducted along with our partners AP-NORC in our ongoing collaboration called the Media Insight Project.

Readers can now find global, dispersed communities for their passions, which creates new markets for news and media organizations to cover these narrow interests and passions in depth. By creating deep communities around topics that extend beyond geography, publishers can find new business opportunities.

There are many reasons a publisher would want to create a single-subject news site. Among them, single-subject sites can:

  • Attract a new audience and deepen the loyalty of an existing audience
  • Expand upon your existing strengths in a cost-effective way
  • Build a new, innovative product under your company’s brand, but with the flexibility of an independent sub-brand

The single-subject strategy can work well even for relatively small or local publishers. Developing a single-subject news product isn’t just for established brands with endless editorial, technical and sales resources. In this study we specifically sought examples of a wide range of news organizations — from big to small, newspapers and magazines, and examples from around the world.

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The King of Late Night… and of Content Marketing: What your B2B brand can learn from Jimmy Fallon

Dix & Eaton

As the Content Marketing World conference and expo descends upon Cleveland this week, I can’t help but think about who’s doing content marketing well. I’ll tell you who I think is doing a great job of content marketing: Jimmy Fallon. He has mastered the art of repurposing content and distributing it across multiple channels, all while keeping the ultimate goal – his audience, not himself – in mind.

So what can your B2B brand learn from Jimmy Fallon’s content marketing efforts?

Create bite-sized pieces of content

fallon facebook examples The King of Late Night… and of Content Marketing: What your B2B brand can learn from Jimmy Fallon

Fallon does an excellent job of breaking apart his hour-long show into smaller, more consumable pieces of content, then distributing them across multiple platforms. (Check out The Tonight Show’s Facebook page if you want to see some examples.) How can you apply that concept to your organization? I’d suggest starting with pieces of content you already have which may be large or overwhelming in their totality. For example, do you produce technical or white papers? Consider creating an infographic breaking down one of the concepts talked about in that paper, or having an engineer do a short video explaining it. It’s about making the content you have consumable – think in terms of many small bites rather than one huge, heavy meal.

Continue Reading…

Paid, Owned, Earned B2B Content Marketing Trends

How effective is your B2B content marketing strategy? IDG Sponsored 2015 research by Content Marketing Institute and Marketing Profs on how tech marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year. This video focuses more specifically on trends within a paid, owned, earned media strategy.

Watch more videos like this.

B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

Content Marketing Institute, Marketing Profs, IDG

Throughout this report, you’ll see how technology marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year and how they compare with the overall sample of B2B marketers who completed our annual content marketing survey. Among all groups we studied this year, technology marketers are the most likely to use content marketing. They’re also the group that is most focused on lead generation as the primary goal for their content marketing efforts. Producing engaging content continues to be a challenge for technology marketers; however, 73% are presently working on initiatives to improve in this area.

Download the 2015 B2B Tech Content Marketing Report

Watch a VIDEO on paid, owned, earned content marketing trends from this research

 Screen Shot 2015 03 26 at 8.52.05 AM B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

The infographic below states which content marketing initiatives B2B tech marketers are working on today and tomorrow. Click here for more info. 

CMI Initiatives 19 B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

Middle East Buyer Behavior

In the first part of IDG Connect Asks research series, we look at buyer behaviour in the Middle East. We surveyed 495 IT professionals in Middle Eastern countries: Turkey, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Bahrain.  372 respondents were from the non-tech industry while the further 107 were from the tech industry.  Respondents were asked a multiple choice question; “When you participate in a purchase decision as part of a buying team which of the following phrases best describes your approach?”.

IDG Connect Buyer Behaviour Regional Research – Middle East

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