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iMedia Breakthrough Summit: The Next Wave of Marketing

10/26/2014 - 10/28/2014 Stone Mountain Georgia

Email Insider Summit

12/07/2014 - 12/10/2014 TBA

iMedia Agency Summit: The Agency Re-Defined: Balancing Scale, Scrappiness, & Innovation

12/07/2014 - 12/10/2014 Bonita Springs FL

Search Insider Summit

12/10/2014 - 12/13/2014 Deer Valley UT

2015 International CES

01/06/2015 - 01/09/2015 Las Vegas Nevada

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News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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11 Elements for Mobile Email Design

Mequoda

Designing email newsletter templates and email promotions for mobile devices has never been more important.

Mobile email design is a hot topic as the usage of mobile devices increases. After researching the topic in depth, I’ve come to some elements of mobile email design that should be considered in the development stage. Whether you’re sending an email newsletter or promoting a product or event, your email design needs to be optimized for mobile if your audience is viewing your content on the go. With the number of mobile users increasing, it’s very likely that a significant portion of your audience is using mobile. Here are a few tips for mobile email design.looking at mobile email design 11 Elements for Mobile Email Design

Mobile Email Design Element #1: Font size - Font for mobile emails needs to be larger than that of standard emails. Apple will automatically increase small font to be the minimum of 13 pixels. On Android devices, 16-18 scale-independent pixels are considered medium and large text sizes. Many designers recommend a minimum of 14 pixel font for body text and minimum of 22 pixel font for headlines.

Mobile Email Design Element #2: Concise headlines – I’m taking a note from app design tips for this one. Try working with a 35-character limit on headlines, and put your most important words up front.

Mobile Email Design Element #3: Design – Single and double column design tend to work the best in mobile, with single being favored by developers looking for complete simplicity. A double column design could work for an email newsletter with a full-text featured article. A single column design would increase clarity for snippet-based email newsletters.

Mobile Email Design Element #4: Proper Separation – Do not put clickable images or links side-by-side or your audience may have trouble clicking the desired link.

 Continue reading… 

U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

IDC PMS4colorversion 1  U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., September 16, 2014IDC Government Insights today announced the availability of a new report, Perspective: Looking Up – U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustain Growth Through 2018 (Doc #GI250735). The detailed report, a follow-up to IDC Government Insights’ inaugural cloud spending forecast in July 2013, evaluates how the U.S. Federal Government is spending part of its IT budget on cloud-based solutions. According to the new forecast, cloud spending now represents about 5% of all IT spending by the federal government. IDC Government Insights expects that the growth will continue into FY2015.

  • ClicktoTweet:  IDC U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

For five years, both the U.S. Federal CIO Council and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) have been pushing government agencies to move some types of IT systems to the cloud, particularly new systems, stored data, and mobile solutions. The ongoing level of spending on cloud solutions indicates that this effort is finally having a significant long-term effect. Total cloud spending is going up and the nature of cloud spending itself is changing.

Key highlights from the forecast include:

  • Federal cloud spending for FY2014 will come in higher that originally predicted. A year ago, OMB stated that agencies are slated to spend a little over $2.2 billion on cloud solutions for 2014. By the end of this fiscal year, that number will grow to more than $3.0 billion.
  • As in the previous two years, OMB has predicted a slight pull-back on cloud spending for upcoming FY2015. The current estimate is just under $2.9 billion for next year, however, IDC Government Insights believes that cloud spending will actually increase, not decrease, for FY2015, rising to perhaps to as much as $3.4 billion.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) is passing Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) as the largest type of cloud spending. Last year, OMB estimated that agencies would spend $1.2 billion on IaaS and $724 million on SaaS for FY 2014. This meant that government was different than other industries, since most spend more of their cloud dollars on SaaS. But by the time FY2014 ends on September 30th, the federal government will have spent just $986 million on IaaS, and over $1.3 billion on SaaS.

Read more…

4 ways magazines are making video work

Digiday

Magazine publishers have plowed money and resources into video. The reason is obvious: Video advertising is a booming market, with plump ad prices that dwarf the CPMs display ads fetch.

But the devil is in the details or, more precisely, in the execution. There are internal challenges to organizing to create video — just ask Condé Nast – in addition to problems around generating a viewership of sufficient scale and putting together attractive ad packages.

“Legacy publishers seem to have internal difficulties shifting to a multi-format content model that is committed to each distribution platform from dot-com to social to apps,” said Paul Kontonis, executive director of the Global Online Video Association. “Shared services is a way to get a publisher to dip their toe in video without overhauling the existing hierarchies, politics and comforting bureaucracies.”

Traditional publishers have made great headway to reinvent their content strategy and distribution model, but they are still building diversified video inventory at scale, said Robin Steinberg, evp, publishing and digital director of investment and activation, MediaVest.

“They are contending with publishers outside their traditional competitive set with stronger targeting capabilities and pricing structures,” she said. “Due to their traditional print legacy position in the marketplace, they have to push harder for a prime seat at the digital video marketplace table.”

Find out the four ways publishers are trying to ensure success…

Four great reasons why email will never, ever die

CITEworld

As we come back from vacation to an inbox filled with hundreds of emails, most of which we don’t need to read, we might let out an anguished bellow and ask: when will we fix email?

Everyone knows how awful it is: you get flooded, it’s pretend work, it’s inefficient, and so on. And everyone is looking for a way to fix email. And every once in a while, a new app comes along that promises to fix email. And every time, it fails. The reason why is that it can’t.

Sorry. It bothers me as much as it does you, but it’s just the truth. You’re not going to fix email. Here’s why.

Saturation

The simplest reason why email can’t be replaced is its 100% saturation. In enterprises today, everyone — and that means everyone — has email.

In business strategy, we often hear about network effects, whereby the value of a network is the square of the members of a network. This is thought to be a great competitive advantage, because network effects mean your business grows very fast as the network grows, and then is very hard to displace. eBay, for example, has a network effect: Because all the sellers are there, that’s where the buyers go; because that’s where the buyers are, that’s where the sellers go. That makes eBay’s business very robust.

But actually, very few networks achieve saturation, meaning that (for practical purposes) everyone is on the network. And there is a very big difference between using a communication network with almost everyone, and using one where there is everyone. Email is the latter. Alternatives to email, no matter how popular, are the former.

If displacing an ordinary network is hard, displacing a network with saturation is impossible. The barriers are too high. Everyone is already checking email, so everyone sends email. Because everyone sends email, everybody has to check email. It will never end.

Social networks don’t take care of all use cases and don’t have saturation

One big promise for “fixing email” is enterprise social networks — JiveYammer, and many others. To some extent, they have helped things. But anyone in a company that uses those social networks knows that they haven’t gotten rid of email. They can actually improve on some common use cases for email, like task management or quick-fire collaborative conversations. But they don’t take care of all, or even most, use cases. Your boss wants to send information about a major new corporate reorganization or strategy to all 150 people in his organization at once? That’s an email. A vendor wants to touch base in a semi-formal way without interrupting you via phone or email? That’s an email.

Continue reading… 

The growing market for digital video ads

Digiday

As online video consumption continues to climb, advertising budgets have swelled to match.

Much of that action happens on YouTube, which owns a huge chunk of the digital video ad market, but probably won’t capture much more in the coming years. It’s an exciting market for publishers, which are looking to counter declining display ad rates. The rise of programmatic buying also has enthused budget-savvy brands and agencies, and video publishers are slowly coming around to embrace the new tech.

Here’s what the market looks like today — and how it will take shape in the years to come.

The digital video ad market will grow faster in 2014 than future years.
The U.S. digital ad spend will grow to $5.9 billion this year, up 56 percent from 2013, according to eMarketer data released last week. But that growth will cool in future years, declining to 13.9 percent by 2018, when the total digital video spend will reach $12.82 billion, eMarketer forecasts.

The research firm cites two trends to explain the dwindling growth. The first: proliferation of premium subscription services like Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, which don’t serve ads. The second, less obvious factor: the growth of mobile video. Mobile video consumption has surged 532 percent since 2012, according to video technology specialist Ooyala. But mobile videos tend to be shorter, and have shorter, less expensive ads accompanying them, so that sector actually suppresses the overall market, eMarketer reasons.

Read on for charts and more information…

Can Print and Online Content Just Get Along? California Sunday Magazine Hopes So.

re/code

In a few weeks, at the beginning of October, a new content effort called California Sunday Magazine will debut aimed at publishing, “thoughtful, reported features and beautiful photography and illustrations set in California, the West, Asia, and Latin America, for a national audience,” of a demographic of 25- to 45-year-olds.

Starting a general-interest publication, offline or online, is not for the faint of heart, although the effort has attracted several million dollars in investment from a range of angel funders.

Which is why it is also going to try to pretend to its readers — largely urban and definitely hipper — that there is absolutely no divide between online and offline, using a design that was aimed at both equally. That means California Sunday Magazine will debut on the Web, across a range of devices (Apple iPhone, Google Android, Amazon Kindle), as well as a print insert to 400,000 selected readers of the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle and Sacramento Bee.

It’s certainly more of an interesting gambit since the effort has its roots in an event series called Pop-Up Magazine. In the hugely popular live show in San Francisco, reported stories are performed by their creators — including high-profile authors like Michael Pollan and Alice Walker.

Read on…

Facebook Announces Facebook Media — A Resource For Media Organizations

Marketing Land

Facebook today rolled out Facebook Media, a new resource to help media organizations and public figures with their Facebook efforts. Facebook Media is modeled after Facebook for Business, a hub for advertisers on the social network.

Facebook director of media partnerships Nick Grudin explained the purpose of the effort in a blog post:

Every day, content creators around the world — from digital publishers, to public figures, to video producers — use Facebook to connect with their audiences in innovative ways. They reach new fans, start conversations and drive discovery of new stories. In the process, they make Facebook more vibrant.

At Facebook, we are committed to building a platform to make these connections broader, richer and more dynamic. That’s why today we are introducing Facebook Media — to highlight great examples and new trends illustrating how public figures, organizations and media are using Facebook to connect with their audiences.

Facebook Media is filled with best-practice advice, much of which applies to anyone using Facebook as a marketing tool. For instance, there’s a good list of tips for driving referrals to digital properties that should be required reading.

 

Continue reading…

Mobile ad measurement begins to evolve beyond click-through rates

The Economist has introduced new mobile advertising analytics that focus on user attention to measure campaign success as the call grows louder for measurement standards addressing the unique qualities of smartphone engagement better than impressions served and click-through rates. 

The need for different data sets to measure mobile advertising is supported by a new report from xAd, which reveals that click-through rates on mobile are a poor indicator of whether or not someone will engage in post-click activities or visit a store. The Economist sees offering new metrics as a way to help its clients run more successful mobile ad campaigns.

“We’re offering TimeGuarantee and ViewGuarantee, and highlighting attention metrics more generally with clients, because we think it is a much better performance indicator for brand campaigns than just impressions and clicks,” said Audra Martin, vice president of digital advertising at The Economist.

Read on…