Events
Event Date Location

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

Data+: Analyze, Predict, Monetize

09/07/2014 - 09/09/2014 Phoenix AZ

iMedia Brand Summit: Marketing in an Always-On World

09/07/2014 - 09/10/2014 Coronado CA

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

Video Insider Summit

09/14/2014 - 09/17/2014 Montauk NY

Ad Age Digital Conference San Francisco

09/16/2014 San Francisco CA

Ad Age CMO Strategy Summit

09/17/2014 San Francisco CA

CSO Perspectives on Defending Against the Pervasive Attacker

09/17/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

09/17/2014 San Jose CA

Digital Media

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Vodafone Case Study

Markets

Us, Netherlands, Singapore, UK, Australia

Challenge

Promote the Vodafone BEA systems partnership that helps to protect businesses and their employees, enhancing agility and productivity on the go.

Solution

A tablet “go big unit” that showcases video within the overlay

Performance

3.38 million impressions delivered

601,000 expands for the go big unit (18% engagement rate)

30,800 videos played

75% watched minimum 50% of the video

21% completion rat

Average 38 seconds video played

83 social shares via FB, Linkedin or Twitter

vodafone Vodafone Case Study

Schneider Electric Case Study

Screen Shot 2014 08 18 at 10.21.52 AM Schneider Electric Case Studyschneider Schneider Electric Case Study
Markets

Even split between Europe, the Middle East and Africa

Challenge

Schneider electronics was looking to engage multiple it audiences with several white papers and videos at once.  The client was interested in leads but also wanted to understand which video and whitepaper assets perform well and generate multiple touch points.

Solution

A dedicated iZone within the IDG connect tablet app promoting client video and whitepaper sophisticated analysis and information via the IDG connect BI tool.

Performance

IDG connect iPad users- 33,105

Average time spend on the app- 9:17 minutes

Schneider iZone- 343 visitors

Schneider videos played- 99

Qualified leads generated- 150

 

 

 

 

 

IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC Retail Insights today announced the availability of a new report, “Business Strategy: Developing an IoT Technology Strategy,” (Document# RI250271), which outlines how retailers must plan now for IoT, even if IoT hasn’t made it to the top of the priorities list. According to the new report, applied IoT technology positively impacts top and bottom line business performance by improving omni-channel operations and enabling personalized and contextualized interaction with consumers. Understanding the technology landscape and defining a roadmap for IoT implementation requires uncommonly long range planning, but is rewarded with reduced long term implementation costs and total cost of ownership (TCO).

ClicktoTweet, “@IDCRetailInsights Arms #Retailers with #IoT Technology Strategy

The convergence of cloud, mobile, big data/analytics and sensors has created an opportunity for retailers to engage consumers and employees in radically new ways.  Within 5 years consumers will expect that retailers engage them with personalized and contextualized interactions. In the same time frame, if the retailer hasn’t figured out how to improve real time inventory accuracy to 98% or better, they will struggle to close the online or click and collect sale.

This report provides the following advice for retailers:

  • A definition of IoT technology
  • A thorough examination of the technology landscape for IoT (for retailers)
  • Specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy
  • Guidance for driving retail IoT programs forward

Leslie Hand, research director, IDC Retail Insights, reports that, “Retailers can improve operations, reduce risk and loss, and wow the consumer with IoT enabled capabilities. Now is the time to establish a strategy and develop a roadmap for IoT. A well thought out plan will guide the reduced cost of ownership of IoT technologies, and enable continued agility and innovation. ”

In another new report announced today, Business Strategy: Understanding the IoT Use Cases For Retail, many of the most common use cases that are being implemented today are discussed including product tracking / traceability, interactive consumer engagement and operations, mobile payments, asset management and fleet and yard management.

The IoT journey, rich in opportunities, is also full of challenges – the biggest of which is enabling tactical applications sometimes in isolation of a plan for an architecture designed for IoT. IoT requires an event oriented paradigm, which includes listening, bi-directional messaging, information distribution, and communications over a variety of networks. The architecture for IoT stretches the limits of retail legacy networks.  When evaluating IoT technologies, IDC Retail Insights recommends retailers gain an understanding of the technology landscape for the variety of technologies and the related intersection points as soon as possible

The new report outlines specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy and emphasizes that retailers interested in engaging the omni-channel consumer with consistent personalized and increasingly contextualized physical and digital interactions, should consider how to build an architecture for IoT that will continue to adapt to consumer interaction patterns and needs. Meanwhile, technology vendors and consultants should help retail enterprises define and understand the IoT opportunities and the path forward.

To learn more about a related IoT report announced today, please visit”Business Strategy: IoT Use Cases for Retail,”

For additional information about this report or to arrange a one-on-one briefing with Leslie Hand please contact Sarah Murray at 781-378-2674 orsarah@attunecommunications.com. Reports are available to qualified members of the media. For information on purchasing reports, contact insights@idc.com; reporters should email sarah@attunecommunications.com.

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Digital value erosion tests brands

Warc

Brands are effectively leaving billions of dollars “on the table” as they struggle to master the demands of the new digital marketing ecosystem, according to a leading executive.

Bob Liodice, president/ceo of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), discussed this topic while speaking at the organisation’s 2014 Digital & Social Media Conference.

Technology, he asserted has “given us so much” as an industry, but has simultaneously created a welter of issues that urgently need to be addressed.

“We’re leaving money on the table. And that pile of money that we’re leaving on the table is growing even worse,” said Liodice. (For more, including results of an ANA/Forrester study, read Warc’s exclusive report: ANA tracks dollar drain in marketing technology.)

“If we don’t arrest this value erosion, it’s going to undercut all of the gains that we’ve made.”

Attempts to place a dollar value on the losses being accrued vary, but some initial estimates peg this total as falling between $7.5bn and $15bn. “Billions and billions of dollars are not necessarily working on our behalf,” said Liodice.

The challenges facing brands are manifold, and range from ad-supported piracy to advertising clutter and non-viewable ads.

Sellers, content creators, associations, buyers and exchanges have also contributed to making the trading environment very complex to navigate.

Among the main results is a profound lack of transparency about where advertising expenditure is ultimately directed, and a large number of intermediaries siphoning off funds during the digital marketing process.

“Like no other time before, marketers are genuinely concerned that their dollars are not necessarily getting to be placed as media,” said Liodice.

“And they don’t totally get what’s going on out there, because the world is exploding, particularly within the media supply chain.”

6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcom’s latest report

The Media Briefing

The dust has by no means settled when it comes to the changing mix of devices and methods people in the UK use to consume content, if Ofcom’s latest communications market report is anything to go by.

As usual it’s packed with useful survey data that helps answer some of the questions publishers have about the way in which their consumers approach media in the digital age, so we’ve picked out six of the most important points. The full reportis worth reading for more detail, however.

1. A laptop still most important device for connecting to the internet

Overall across all internet users, a laptop was considered the most important device for connecting to the internet, according to 40 percent of respondents. However, more respondents said a smartphone was more important than a desktop for getting online – 23 percent to 20 percent, respectively.

Only 15 percent of respondents said a tablet was the most important device, up from 8 percent in 2013.

Those tablet stats almost double however when just looking at those people who actually have a tablet.

mostimportantdevice 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

2. Newspapers won’t be missed

Given TheMediaBriefing’s raison d’étre, we’re pretty attached to newspapers and magazines.

However, the wider population doesn’t seem so sentimental, with just two percent of respondents saying a newspaper would be form of media they would miss the most.

Unsurprisingly, watching TV tops the leaderboard for most-missed media (42 percent), but smartphone use comes in second, with 22 percent of respondents saying they would miss it the most.

mostmissed 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

3. Less time is spent listening to radio

More time is spent per day using TV, the internet, and mobile phones, but consumers are spending less time per day using the radio, which has dropped from 172 to 166 minutes in the last 5 years.

Consumers are now spending an average of 68 minutes a day using the internet on a PC or laptop, and only 28 minutes a day on a mobile phone, which seems a little low, but the averages are probably skewed by older age groups that still use traditional consumption forms like TV and radio and eschew more digital alternatives.

timeperday 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

 Continue reading

World Tech Update- August 14, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU Microsoft and Samsung introduce new smartphones, a high tech helmet goes on sale and tech CEOs join the ice bucket challenge.

Should publishers really think ‘mobile-first’?

Digiday

The trend for many publishers is to loudly declare they are “mobile-first.” But the reality is, well, more complicated.

Most mobile-first proponents loudly trumpet exploding mobile audiences. That’s true. Just about every publisher today is seeing an increasing amount of their traffic coming from mobile devices — often over 50 percent of their overall, in the case of sites like BuzzFeed,Glamour and CNN.  Yet it’s not a zero-sum game: Most publishers are seeing their desktop audiences grow, too, albeit at a much slower rate than mobile.

According to publisher analytics service Chartbeat,  mobile consumption is, on the whole, complementing desktop. Desktop traffic is essentially daytime traffic: It starts to increase at 9 a.m., peaks at noon and starts to decline at 6 p.m. Mobile, in contrast, tends to decline in the early morning and peak in the evening. Put in more concrete terms, people are reading on their desktops while at work and shifting to tablets and smartphones while at home.

 Should publishers really think ‘mobile first’?

There’s no doubt that many publishers are seeing surges in mobile traffic, but right now, they’re not all seeing corresponding declines. Data from comScore shows that while mobile traffic to the Web’s top 10 news/information properties grew 36 percent in the US last year, overall desktop traffic for those sites decreased by just 1 percent. Mobile consumption may be eating into desktop habits, but, so far, it’s doing so slowly.

“In general, it seems like each medium is strong while the others are weak,” said Josh Schwartz, chief data scientist at Chartbeat. “People are using phones while they wouldn’t be using desktops anyway,” he said.

Continue reading…

Here’s how wearables will invade the workplace

CITEworld

When people discuss wearable tech, it’s typically as a consumer phenomenon. Smartwatches, Fitbits, Google Glass — these products seem like they’re for hipsters only, not mainstream consumers.

But if anything, it’s the opposite. It’s probably true that most people will feel silly wearing Google Glass, for example. But it’s also probably true that there are countless business contexts where your boss will want you to wear Google Glass.

Let’s look at some of the most promising future applications of wearables in the enterprise.

Google Glass (or something like it)

Let’s start with them. So mocked. They probably don’t have a future as a consumer device, at least in the short and even medium term. (Long term, who knows?) But they — or something like them, such as the Vuzix M100 – most certainly have a future in the workplace.

The first and obvious application is on-premises security. From police departments to private security firms to the military to bar bouncers, Google Glass has obvious applications.

Other applications include retail (think of store greeters), medicine (one hospital in Boston is already using them in the emergency room, and a number of startups like Pristine are well along the way to developing Glass apps for surgeons), and any kind of hands-on work done in remote locations — think oil drilling, mining, and the like.

Fitness trackers and health insurance

This is a bit Orwellian but also perhaps unavoidable  if you work for a big corporation and they think they can reduce their insurance bill by getting you to wear a Fitbit or equivalent device, they will. Some companies may even see and promote it as an employee perk, since a lot of people get value out of fitness trackers.

Cutting down health costs is a huge priority of governments and private sector actors alike, and the idea that using the bio data our bodies generate could help to do this is a powerful one. The idea is that insurers would pay you to wear fitness trackers, and then pay you even more to behave healthfully; since most people in the United States get health insurance through their employers, the way to roll this out would be via large employers.

The privacy and security applications are immense, but so is the drive to make this system a reality, whether you want to or not.

Retail

Wearable tech will also make quick inroads into the retail space. Apple’s iBeacon is already a potential enabling technology there. Many startups and large retail firms are working on ways to identify customers as they walk in the door.

Continue reading…

61% of Consumers Prefer Companies With Custom Online Content

Mashable

Content marketing campaigns have become essential for marketers to engage audiences and generate leads. In fact, more than half of all consumers are more likely to buy from companies that create custom content.

But one of the biggest challenges B2B and B2C marketers face is measuring ROI. Only 27% of marketers track content metrics effectively.

Luckily, the folks at Captora created a graphic visualizing new data on metrics of success, which types of content have the highest ROI, the best days to share content on social media and more.

Take a look at the infographic below to help organize your content marketing goals and make strategic decisions about effective content.

Captora Mashable 61% of Consumers Prefer Companies With Custom Online Content

How to Increase YouTube Engagement [Infographic]

SocialMouth

Many business that produce content as a marketing initiative are looking for alternatives to jump into different types of media and new channels of distribution to reach their potential customer.

Vine, Instagram, even Tumblr. But even though some have implemented a YouTube strategy in the last couple of years, it’s still a little intimating for many businesses, there’s the production aspect of it, and it can also be a little more complex in terms of understanding how to generate engagement.

Usually when I put it on the table with my clients, they look like video content is a bit more that they can handle.

But, is YouTube Marketing it worth the effort?

  • YouTube is the number one video website in the world
  • About 800 million people visit it every month
  • Many searches are conducted directly on YouTube instead of Google

In other words, the potential to help your prospect find your business in a whole different marketplace is huge.

If you’re ready to start considering YouTube as a content marketing vehicle, or you’ve already started getting your feet wet, this infographic by QuickSproutprovides some key stats and best practices to generate more engagement.

how to increase youtube engagement How to Increase YouTube Engagement [Infographic]