Events
Event Date Location

Video Insider Summit

09/14/2014 - 09/17/2014 Montauk NY

Ad Age Digital Conference San Francisco

09/16/2014 San Francisco CA

Ad Age CMO Strategy Summit

09/17/2014 San Francisco CA

CSO Perspectives on Defending Against the Pervasive Attacker

09/17/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

09/17/2014 San Jose CA

CIO Perspectives Chicago 

09/18/2014 Chicago IL

 CSO Perspectives on Data Protection and Privacy

09/23/2014 San francisco CA

OMMA Premium Display @ Advertising Week

09/30/2014 New York NY

OMMA RTB (Real-Time Buying) @ Advertising Week

10/02/2014 New York NY

The Hub Brand Experience Symposium

10/07/2014 - 10/08/2014 New York NY

Digital Media

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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The future of marketing: Precognition, bots, and user agents

CITEworld

The movie 2002 Minority Report nailed what the future of CRM will look like — but not in the scene you are probably remembering.

The scene everybody remembers has the Tom Cruise character walking through a department store where he is targeted, by name, by such brands as Lexus and Bulgari based on biometric readings taken from his irises. But the true bit of prescience in the movie is the specialized PreCrime police department’s ability to predict who will commit a murder and then stop it before it happens.

A day in the life

To really understand this scenario, let’s consider Ava, a consumer in 2039. She’s not much for advertising or interacting with flashy brands — ads for Lexus and Bulgari would basically roll right off her. She is more into sustainable living, farm-to-table food, support emerging market micro-commerce, and animal rescue — not exactly topics or channels that today’s marketers or companies can really reach. But in 2039 that will hardly matter.

Lisa Arthur, CMO for Teradata Marketing Applications, describes a day in Ava’s life. She gets into her smart car and it asks if she wants to go to her usual round of stops that she makes on the weekend. Ava says yes and they drive to her favorite organic grocery store, which primarily sells small, local organic labels. She walks into the store, which recognizes her — or at least her mobile or wearable device (the form factor of this device still a bit hazy from our 25-year view, but you get the idea). Instantly, it knows that she always buys a particular brand of bread when she is there. The store sadly informs her they are out at the moment and would she like to order some? Ava says yes and continues to shop.

While she’s shopping, she sees several handcrafted items from artists in Africa and thinks they would make nice gifts for the upcoming holiday season. She presses her device against them, buys them, and at the same time has them shipped to the recipients. Ava won’t have to schlep them home to package and mail them out later. Then it’s off to the gym, where the man next to her is rocking out to music on a pair of headphones that catches Ava’s eye. He lets her try them out and she decides to buy them. Presto goes the device, but this time Ava isn’t sending them elsewhere — she has bought them for herself and they are waiting for her at home later that afternoon.

We see glimmers of this world here and there today, in such developments as predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, natural language systems, big data, and the internet of things. Networks, channels, and data will be integrated to the point where people can communicate and interact with brands and service providers like they were people on the street to whom you would say hello.

Judgments about consumers and potential consumers will be made instantaneously, based on an enormous amount of information, much of which comes from everyday objects around the house and in the store and workplace. As for actual voice or electronic or in-person conversions with customers, those will be few and far between. They won’t be necessary: Like the specialized PreCrime police department in Minority Report, retailers and other service providers will just know.

Read more…

Facebook Launches Cross-Device Reporting

MediaPost

Being able to track campaign performance across devices has become increasingly crucial to advertisers as consumer attention shifts from desktop to mobile screens. To that end, Facebook on Wednesday rolled out cross-device reporting for ads, allowing marketers to see how people are moving among devices and across mobile apps and the Web.

“Facebook already offers targeting, delivery and conversion measurement across devices. With the new cross-device report, advertisers are now able to view the devices on which people see ads and the devices on which conversions subsequently occur,” stated a Facebook blog post today.

As an example, the company said an advertiser can view the number of customers who clicked an ad on an iPhone, but then later converted on desktop, or the number of people who saw an ad on desktop, and later converted on an Android tablet.

In a recent analysis conducted between May 15 and July 24, Facebook found that among people who viewed a mobile Facebook ad in the U.S., nearly a third (32%) eventually clicked on the same ad on the desktop within 28 days. The conversion rate was lower over shorter periods of time. So within a week of seeing a mobile ad, 22% converted on the desktop, and after a day, 11%.

The cross-device reporting relies on data from Facebook’s conversion pixel, a piece of tracking code used in conjunction with the social network’s software development kit (SDK), to get reports on which device someone saw an ad and eventually converted. The overall aim is to go beyond last-click attribution to see how different devices and app actions influenced a click.

To see cross-device conversions for campaigns, advertisers can go to the Facebook Ad Reports page, click Edit Columns and select Cross-Device on the left-hand menu.

Samsung buys SmartThings in ambitious push to connect your home

IDG News Service

Samsung has agreed to buy SmartThings, a two-year-old startup that makes software to connect household objects and let them be controlled from afar via smartphone.

The deal, announced Thursday, gives Samsung a solid foothold in the burgeoning “Internet of things” market. IoT generally involves connecting objects such as cameras, sensors and appliances using a wireless Internet connection and controlling them or collecting data.

“SmartThings supports an open and growing ecosystem of developers, who are producing new types of connected devices and unique apps in the cloud that change how everyday objects work,” Samsung said in a press release.

Terms were not disclosed, but a report in Re/code cited a roughly $200 million price tag. Samsung did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

SmartThings makes a mobile app for controlling a range of devices, as well as a software platform for outside developers and device makers. Samsung has become active in this area with its Tizen mobile operating system, which is designed to let consumers control utilities and appliances with their smartphones and other mobile devices.

The acquisition should broaden Samsung’s efforts and let it expand the SmartThings platform to more partners and devices.

SmartThings will operate independently under SmartThings CEO Alex Hawkinson but will move from Washington, D.C., to Samsung’s Open Innovation Center in Palo Alto, California, where Samsung works on bringing new types of software applications to its hardware.

“While we will remain operationally independent, joining forces with Samsung will enable us to support all of the leading smartphone vendors, devices, and applications,” Hawkinson said in a blog post.

IoT activity has heated up over the past year. In a high-profile move earlier this year, Google announced its acquisition of Nest, the smart thermostat maker, for $3.2 billion.

SmartThings got its start on Kickstarter.

Sales of wearables set to rocket despite current ‘chaotic’ stage of development

MarketingWeek

Sales of smart wearable devices are forecast to grow from 9.7 million in 2013 to 135 million in 2018, according to CCS Insight’s global forecast. Wrist-worn devices are expected to account for 87 per cent of the devices sold in 2018, which will be made up of 68 million smart watches and 50 million smart bands.

“Quantified self” devices – which track things such as steps taken, sleep and calories burned – are currently the fastest growing category of wearables, which CCS Insight says can be attributed to their “clear purpose” and affordable prices. The researchers predict around 7 per cent of the population in developed markets will own a quantified self device by the end of 2018.

Such devices are likely to be popular Christmas gifts this year, fuelling strong growth of wearable sales in the final quarter. The researchers predict wearable shipments will rise 129 per cent year on year to 22 million in 2014.

In the second half of 2014, standalone cellular wearables with their own SIM cards that do not require a connection to a separate smartphone or computer are expected to become more prominent in the wearables category. However, these devices will face “significant challenges” as many consumers will be reluctant to take out additional contracts with their mobile operators, CCS Insight says.

Looking further ahead, CCS Insight forecasts strong future growth in smart watches, as the company expects many smart band manufacturers to update their ranges by adding devices with screens. By 2018 smart watches are expected to displace fitness bands altogether as their capabilities are expanded and prices come down.

Marina Koytcheva, CCS Insight director of forecasting, says: “The wearables market is in its Stone Age right now. There needs to be huge improvements to broaden their appeal. This is particularly acute when it comes to devices for women: wearables need to quickly move on from black, clunky devices – fortunately we’re starting to see the first steps in this direction.”

The category faces several challenges, as consumers struggle to come to terms with whether some wearables – such as Google Glass – are socially acceptable and brands in the sector also need to overcome privacy concerns over data collection.

Koytcheva says the market could still yet be changed “beyond recognition” if a major player such as Apple – which is reported to be developing an iWatch – enters the category.

She adds: “History shows us that when Apple enters a market it can reshape the way people think about a product.”

North America leads in terms of wearables adoption, with more than 40 per cent of all wearable devices currently in use in the region. The CCS Insight forecast says this is partially because many wearable companies – such as Google, Fitbit and Jawbone – are based there, but also because US consumers tend to be early technology adopters.

However, consumers in Western Europe are expected to buy more wearables than those in North America by 2016.

Facebook is best for small businesses

Warc

Facebook is by far the most effective social media platform for driving offline sales for small businesses, according to a new report.

Digital marketing company G/O Digital surveyed 1,000 US users aged 18 to 29 for a study on Facebook advertising and found that 84% of respondents said local deals or offers on that site were a major influence on their purchasing decisions. Further, 25% said “it’s very important and I would be likely to make an in-store purchase within a week”.

Facebook offers that could be redeemed at a local store were by far the most persuasive marketing tactic. Some 40% cited this as being most likely to influence them to make an in-store purchase at a local or small business.

Promoted Posts were effective for 12% and photos/videos for 11%, while loyalty app promotions gained a 10% response.

Facebook was also way out in front when respondents were asked which social media channel they found most useful for researching products or services before visiting a local business. Fully 62% opted for Facebook, with Pinterest (12%), Twitter (11%) and Instagram (9%) trailing in its wake.

“The most bang-for-your-buck way for many small businesses to drive in-store activity and sales through social marketing in the short term is going to be Facebook,” Jeff Fagel, G/O Digital CMO, told ClickZ.

“Pinterest and Twitter should definitely have a place in their larger social marketing strategy, but will serve different purposes and support different objectives,” he added.

Amid the ongoing debate about privacy, and recent revelations surrounding Facebook’s manipulation of news feeds, G/O Digital’s research suggested that local relevance and personalisation might be more important for users.

It found that just over one third (36%) of respondents felt that “ads that are targeted based on your personal interests and past purchases” were most likely to influence them to interact with Facebook ads from small businesses. More than one quarter considered “ads that are targeted based on current location” to be most influential.

“It’s all about relevancy,” Fagel declared. “For example, if you offer me $2 off a hot dog at a baseball game, I won’t mind having my mobile viewing experience interrupted by this ad, because it’s solving an immediate, relevant need that I have: feeding my hunger and giving me a discount at the same time.”

Vodafone Case Study

Markets

Us, Netherlands, Singapore, UK, Australia

Challenge

Promote the Vodafone BEA systems partnership that helps to protect businesses and their employees, enhancing agility and productivity on the go.

Solution

A tablet “go big unit” that showcases video within the overlay

Performance

3.38 million impressions delivered

601,000 expands for the go big unit (18% engagement rate)

30,800 videos played

75% watched minimum 50% of the video

21% completion rat

Average 38 seconds video played

83 social shares via FB, Linkedin or Twitter

vodafone Vodafone Case Study

Schneider Electric Case Study

Screen Shot 2014 08 18 at 10.21.52 AM Schneider Electric Case Studyschneider Schneider Electric Case Study
Markets

Even split between Europe, the Middle East and Africa

Challenge

Schneider electronics was looking to engage multiple it audiences with several white papers and videos at once.  The client was interested in leads but also wanted to understand which video and whitepaper assets perform well and generate multiple touch points.

Solution

A dedicated iZone within the IDG connect tablet app promoting client video and whitepaper sophisticated analysis and information via the IDG connect BI tool.

Performance

IDG connect iPad users- 33,105

Average time spend on the app- 9:17 minutes

Schneider iZone- 343 visitors

Schneider videos played- 99

Qualified leads generated- 150

 

 

 

 

 

IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC Retail Insights today announced the availability of a new report, “Business Strategy: Developing an IoT Technology Strategy,” (Document# RI250271), which outlines how retailers must plan now for IoT, even if IoT hasn’t made it to the top of the priorities list. According to the new report, applied IoT technology positively impacts top and bottom line business performance by improving omni-channel operations and enabling personalized and contextualized interaction with consumers. Understanding the technology landscape and defining a roadmap for IoT implementation requires uncommonly long range planning, but is rewarded with reduced long term implementation costs and total cost of ownership (TCO).

ClicktoTweet, “@IDCRetailInsights Arms #Retailers with #IoT Technology Strategy

The convergence of cloud, mobile, big data/analytics and sensors has created an opportunity for retailers to engage consumers and employees in radically new ways.  Within 5 years consumers will expect that retailers engage them with personalized and contextualized interactions. In the same time frame, if the retailer hasn’t figured out how to improve real time inventory accuracy to 98% or better, they will struggle to close the online or click and collect sale.

This report provides the following advice for retailers:

  • A definition of IoT technology
  • A thorough examination of the technology landscape for IoT (for retailers)
  • Specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy
  • Guidance for driving retail IoT programs forward

Leslie Hand, research director, IDC Retail Insights, reports that, “Retailers can improve operations, reduce risk and loss, and wow the consumer with IoT enabled capabilities. Now is the time to establish a strategy and develop a roadmap for IoT. A well thought out plan will guide the reduced cost of ownership of IoT technologies, and enable continued agility and innovation. ”

In another new report announced today, Business Strategy: Understanding the IoT Use Cases For Retail, many of the most common use cases that are being implemented today are discussed including product tracking / traceability, interactive consumer engagement and operations, mobile payments, asset management and fleet and yard management.

The IoT journey, rich in opportunities, is also full of challenges – the biggest of which is enabling tactical applications sometimes in isolation of a plan for an architecture designed for IoT. IoT requires an event oriented paradigm, which includes listening, bi-directional messaging, information distribution, and communications over a variety of networks. The architecture for IoT stretches the limits of retail legacy networks.  When evaluating IoT technologies, IDC Retail Insights recommends retailers gain an understanding of the technology landscape for the variety of technologies and the related intersection points as soon as possible

The new report outlines specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy and emphasizes that retailers interested in engaging the omni-channel consumer with consistent personalized and increasingly contextualized physical and digital interactions, should consider how to build an architecture for IoT that will continue to adapt to consumer interaction patterns and needs. Meanwhile, technology vendors and consultants should help retail enterprises define and understand the IoT opportunities and the path forward.

To learn more about a related IoT report announced today, please visit”Business Strategy: IoT Use Cases for Retail,”

For additional information about this report or to arrange a one-on-one briefing with Leslie Hand please contact Sarah Murray at 781-378-2674 orsarah@attunecommunications.com. Reports are available to qualified members of the media. For information on purchasing reports, contact insights@idc.com; reporters should email sarah@attunecommunications.com.

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Digital value erosion tests brands

Warc

Brands are effectively leaving billions of dollars “on the table” as they struggle to master the demands of the new digital marketing ecosystem, according to a leading executive.

Bob Liodice, president/ceo of the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), discussed this topic while speaking at the organisation’s 2014 Digital & Social Media Conference.

Technology, he asserted has “given us so much” as an industry, but has simultaneously created a welter of issues that urgently need to be addressed.

“We’re leaving money on the table. And that pile of money that we’re leaving on the table is growing even worse,” said Liodice. (For more, including results of an ANA/Forrester study, read Warc’s exclusive report: ANA tracks dollar drain in marketing technology.)

“If we don’t arrest this value erosion, it’s going to undercut all of the gains that we’ve made.”

Attempts to place a dollar value on the losses being accrued vary, but some initial estimates peg this total as falling between $7.5bn and $15bn. “Billions and billions of dollars are not necessarily working on our behalf,” said Liodice.

The challenges facing brands are manifold, and range from ad-supported piracy to advertising clutter and non-viewable ads.

Sellers, content creators, associations, buyers and exchanges have also contributed to making the trading environment very complex to navigate.

Among the main results is a profound lack of transparency about where advertising expenditure is ultimately directed, and a large number of intermediaries siphoning off funds during the digital marketing process.

“Like no other time before, marketers are genuinely concerned that their dollars are not necessarily getting to be placed as media,” said Liodice.

“And they don’t totally get what’s going on out there, because the world is exploding, particularly within the media supply chain.”

6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcom’s latest report

The Media Briefing

The dust has by no means settled when it comes to the changing mix of devices and methods people in the UK use to consume content, if Ofcom’s latest communications market report is anything to go by.

As usual it’s packed with useful survey data that helps answer some of the questions publishers have about the way in which their consumers approach media in the digital age, so we’ve picked out six of the most important points. The full reportis worth reading for more detail, however.

1. A laptop still most important device for connecting to the internet

Overall across all internet users, a laptop was considered the most important device for connecting to the internet, according to 40 percent of respondents. However, more respondents said a smartphone was more important than a desktop for getting online – 23 percent to 20 percent, respectively.

Only 15 percent of respondents said a tablet was the most important device, up from 8 percent in 2013.

Those tablet stats almost double however when just looking at those people who actually have a tablet.

mostimportantdevice 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

2. Newspapers won’t be missed

Given TheMediaBriefing’s raison d’étre, we’re pretty attached to newspapers and magazines.

However, the wider population doesn’t seem so sentimental, with just two percent of respondents saying a newspaper would be form of media they would miss the most.

Unsurprisingly, watching TV tops the leaderboard for most-missed media (42 percent), but smartphone use comes in second, with 22 percent of respondents saying they would miss it the most.

mostmissed 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

3. Less time is spent listening to radio

More time is spent per day using TV, the internet, and mobile phones, but consumers are spending less time per day using the radio, which has dropped from 172 to 166 minutes in the last 5 years.

Consumers are now spending an average of 68 minutes a day using the internet on a PC or laptop, and only 28 minutes a day on a mobile phone, which seems a little low, but the averages are probably skewed by older age groups that still use traditional consumption forms like TV and radio and eschew more digital alternatives.

timeperday 6 things publishers need to know about UK media consumption, from Ofcoms latest report

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