Advertising & Marketing Events
Event Date Location

2015 International CES

01/06/2015 - 01/09/2015 Las Vegas Nevada

lead-generation

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Customer-Focused Teams Are Secretly Daunted By Data Demands

IDG Connect 08111 Customer Focused Teams Are Secretly Daunted By Data Demands

One of the top goals for business leaders today is to better understand, engage with and retain their customers[i]. This involves making the most of the ever-growing volume of customer data available to build integrated, three-dimensional profiles of customers and to identify patterns and trends. Many firms turn to the roles closest to the customer to deliver this insight.

Recent research undertaken with PwC[ii] reveals that nearly two-thirds of European and just under half of North American mid-market firms believe their marketing teams have the best skills to extract insight from information, and around half (46% and 57% respectively) say the same for their customer service and insight teams.

Yet conversations with marketing leaders reveal that the teams in question are far less confident about their ability to achieve this.

One study[iii] found that a third of executives believe that being able to use data analytics to extract predictive findings from big data is the top skill required of their marketing professionals. However, just under half admit their own team lacks this skill. Another[iv] discovered that an overwhelming 82% of marketing leaders feel unprepared to deal with the data explosion, and only 59% say they have the skills to analyse and understand customer behaviour across all channels.

Despite this clearly recognised skills gap, only one in five marketing professionals is expected to receive formal training in data analysis this year[v].

In short, many firms could be passing data to teams that are ill-equipped to do it justice. Missing out on rich customer insight is just one of the risks. Our research found that marketing teams are increasingly given free access to sensitive and confidential customer information in order to extract intelligence, but are rarely held accountable for keeping it safe.

We discovered that less than one per cent of mid-market firms think teams such as marketing and customer insight should have a responsibility for information protection. Many (39%) place this responsibility firmly at the door of the IT security manager.

This is all the more worrying when you consider the fact that marketing departments are often at the forefront of flexible working practices[vi], allowing staff to work from home or while travelling – often without providing adequate guidance and support.

We found that one in three marketing professionals works from home two-to-four days a week, more than most other job roles. A third undertake confidential or sensitive work while travelling on public transport; one in four throw documents into insecure bins away from the office – and 48% send or receive work documents over a personal email account, at times using an insecure wireless network (12%). However, just a third of the employers surveyed provide secure remote intranet access for marketing professionals working from home, or offer guidelines or policies on how to handle sensitive information.

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Research: How to Drive Engagement Through Social Media 2014

IDG Connect 0811 Research: How to Drive Engagement Through Social Media 2014

In January 2006 Twitter didn’t exist, blogging was mocked, and Facebook was for students. Over the following five years social media took off, but still many people questioned the importance of social networks in the B2B space. Now in 2014, its usefulness has been proven over and over again and it continues to gain momentum. In fact, as content marketing gradually grows in importance, social media is playing an even more significant role.

Summary

New research conducted in November 2013 by IDG Connect shows that 86% of B2B Information Technology (IT) buyers are currently using
social media networks in their purchase decision process. Social media is not only important for companies, but it is now a necessary investment and crucial element of any go-to-market strategies. And findings suggest this is only set to increase over the next couple of years.

  • 86% of IT buyers are using social media networks and content in their purchase decision process
  • Social media is used most often in the general education stage of the buying cycle
  • 89% of IT buyers prefer educational content to promotional content in their favored social media channels
  • 62% of IT buyers are most interested in seeing e-seminars (virtual events) from social channels
  • Product/Service reviews are the content types that IT buyers prefer to see links from via social channels
  • In two years, social, peer-generated content will have greater weight versus editorial and vendor content in making IT investment decisions

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Screen Shot 2014 01 13 at 4.39.11 PM Research: How to Drive Engagement Through Social Media 2014

Brand Publishers Are Ditching Facebook in Favor of Microsites

ADWEEK

Brand publishers are more aware that they’re really just renting social media space on Facebook and are moving resources away from the social network.

One agency said its clients are pulling away from Facebook in “dramatic numbers”—reallocating their resources to microsites and alternate social channels like LinkedIn—after the agency’s social media managers saw a “dramatic dip” in reach for their messaging over the last 16 months. They attributed this decline to Facebook’s EdgeRank algorithm, which curates the content users see in their News Feeds.

“Brands don’t own what happens on Facebook, and as organic reach has been absolutely eviscerated, they remain aware of that,” said Forrester analyst Nate Elliott, adding that marketers have been telling him that they no longer see Facebook as a viable marketing channel.

Facebook’s complete control of content on the platform can also wreak havoc on brand campaigns developed specifically for the social network. In March 2012, Elliott said the mandatory Timeline layout change wrecked some custom brand page experiences. “Just changing one pixel can ruin the entire thing,” he pointed out.

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Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

IDG Connect 0811 Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

With video consumption on the rise, audiences today expect to able to receive information that is easy to digest and also engaging. It is predicted that by 2016, 1.6 billion people will be watching video online, and the growth of video traffic on the web will rise from 57% to 69% by 2017. As a result, a million minutes of video content will cross the network every second in 2017.

Given the eminence and influence video content will have over the next few years it could become one of the marketing department’s most powerful tools. Videos can be shared as compelling content that can help attract new customers, encourage existing ones to upgrade to a new product or spread product information quickly and efficiently.

Short videos can even be used as an alternative to lengthy text descriptions, telephone calls and face-to-face demonstrations to help a customer chose the right product for them. James McQuivey from Forrester Research believes that one minute of video can be equivalent to 1.8 million words. Video can provide easily accessible, on-demand information that is also engaging to a wider customer base.

Creating video content that is audience-tailored and accessible across multiple devices can keep digital marketing initiatives on the road to success. One quick and easy method of content creation is screencasting. Screencasting software records everything on your screen from applications and mouse clicks to your audio commentary. Screencasting technology is efficient since little investment is required for equipment and unlike working with video cameras or other videography equipment, very little training is needed.

To make successful screencasts, there are a few factors any marketer should consider:

Know Your Audience

With any video marketing initiative, understanding what makes your audience tick should be a priority. One video might be the right hook for a particular viewer, however could completely miss the mark for someone else.

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U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

IDC PMS4colorversion 1  U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., September 16, 2014IDC Government Insights today announced the availability of a new report, Perspective: Looking Up – U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustain Growth Through 2018 (Doc #GI250735). The detailed report, a follow-up to IDC Government Insights’ inaugural cloud spending forecast in July 2013, evaluates how the U.S. Federal Government is spending part of its IT budget on cloud-based solutions. According to the new forecast, cloud spending now represents about 5% of all IT spending by the federal government. IDC Government Insights expects that the growth will continue into FY2015.

  • ClicktoTweet:  IDC U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

For five years, both the U.S. Federal CIO Council and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) have been pushing government agencies to move some types of IT systems to the cloud, particularly new systems, stored data, and mobile solutions. The ongoing level of spending on cloud solutions indicates that this effort is finally having a significant long-term effect. Total cloud spending is going up and the nature of cloud spending itself is changing.

Key highlights from the forecast include:

  • Federal cloud spending for FY2014 will come in higher that originally predicted. A year ago, OMB stated that agencies are slated to spend a little over $2.2 billion on cloud solutions for 2014. By the end of this fiscal year, that number will grow to more than $3.0 billion.
  • As in the previous two years, OMB has predicted a slight pull-back on cloud spending for upcoming FY2015. The current estimate is just under $2.9 billion for next year, however, IDC Government Insights believes that cloud spending will actually increase, not decrease, for FY2015, rising to perhaps to as much as $3.4 billion.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) is passing Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) as the largest type of cloud spending. Last year, OMB estimated that agencies would spend $1.2 billion on IaaS and $724 million on SaaS for FY 2014. This meant that government was different than other industries, since most spend more of their cloud dollars on SaaS. But by the time FY2014 ends on September 30th, the federal government will have spent just $986 million on IaaS, and over $1.3 billion on SaaS.

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Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors in US & UK

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors in US & UK

By Jessica Maxwell

We recently completed research that looked at how irrelevant content impacts B2B vendors’ bottom lines. We did two separate surveys that were based on technology buyers who had actively made a purchase decision in the last 12 to 18 months; one was to a US audience and one was to a UK audience.

Despite how different these two regions are, we were surprised to see that the results were extremely similar for every question we asked. Content is irrelevant in both of these markets, and no one is happy about it.

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Here is an infographic view of the US and UK comparison:

irrelevant digital content impacts B2B Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors in US & UK

For more blogs and research from IDG Connect, click here 

Power in their hands? 4 challenges publishers should think about as opportunities

The Media Briefing

You’re entitled to an eye roll over the phrase “the power is firmly in their hands” when someone references the changing mobile landscape, but the phrase still stands.

We’re not the ones saying it this time, however, but rather IDG Global Solutions in their latest report/survey: The Mobile Evolution: Connecting Content.

More than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries were interviewed for the report, which focuses on four key areas:

  1. Tech choices
  2. Attention
  3. Video
  4. The evolving media landscape

1. Tech choices

As well as the simple technological fact that the internet is a two-way communication platform and doesn’t run on a broadcast model like print, radio, or television, it also means that communication has changed as our culture is always-on.

That always-on factor is being taken advantage of by companies looking to grab your attention wherever they can. Phone in your pocket? Not to worry, we’ll strap a mobile to your wrist and call it a smartwatch. Left your smartwatch at home? Not to worry, we’ll place a screen directly in front of your eyes so there’s no escape.

“The future is predicted to be omnichannel. People want to move seamlessly between devices wherever, whatever, whenever they want,” says the report, but we say it’s already here: smart TVs, tablets, mobiles, tablets, smartwatches and google glass are all evidence of different screens used in different ways that consumers are already using.

We’ll permit you another eyeroll at the phrase “The Internet of Things,” but it’s another point in the direction of omnichannel consumption habits.

2. Attention

Although placing screens directly in front of your eyes captures your attention pretty well, most people still don’t own Google Glass. More and more people are buying tablets, however: IDG reports that three years ago when they conducted the study only 20 percent of respondents said they owned a tablet. That figure is now 60 percent.

Capturing your audience’s attention is also harder than before. The disruptive nature of the internet has changed the way we communicate, too, especially for younger people, who text (up to 160 characters), Snapchat (up to 10 seconds), Instagram (up to 15 seconds), Tweet (up to 140 characters), and Emoji (we’re coining the verb) in short bursts.

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MEDIA VOICES: The Wall Street Journal Shares Best Practices for Video Ads

eMarketer

Trevor Fellows, global head of advertising sales for The Wall Street Journal, spoke with eMarketer’s Danielle Drolet about best practices in digital video advertising.

eMarketer: What have you learned over the years about video advertising that you have developed into a best practice?

Trevor Fellows: The user experience has to be paramount. Interestingly, at the moment, there is significantly more demand for video space than there is inventory.

Everybody’s interests are best served by putting the user experience first. We get better quality impressions. Users trust the video experience that they watch with us, and hopefully they enjoy and trust the video content, too.

Consequently, we ensure that our pre-rolls are relatively short. We’ll run 10- or 15-second pre-rolls. And in some cases there’s video where we won’t place any advertising at all—in very important news stories, for example.

eMarketer: How should advertisers determine video length?

Fellows: It depends on the type of content and the length of the content. There’s a world of difference between long-form and short-form online video. We publish both, but the overwhelming majority of our content is relatively short form, and consequently, we make sure our advertisers know that.

The people willing to sit through 30 minutes are much more likely to watch a 30-second commercial beforehand or to sit through a break at some stage in between. But because most of our video views are coming from clips that are anywhere between 90-seconds and two-and-a-half or 3 minutes, we’re looking at a 10- or 15-second pre-roll.

eMarketer: What creative works well there?

Fellows: What makes good content is hugely subjective. The one thing that we would ask is, “Is this an interruptive experience?” This is classic advertising. We would strongly advise two things: One, the content should be of a very high production quality and interesting; second, the advertisers should provide a significant amount of variety around their commercial messages. When looking at online storytelling, it’s a best practice to look at the propensity of the audiences to watch two, three, four videos in a row. There are some advertisers that make just one creative and expect to repeat that. That’s not good for the advertiser, and it’s not good for the viewer either.

eMarketer: What type of video ads are most effective?

Fellows: Pre-roll is the most effective. There’s an enormous amount of deliberate confusion as to what constitutes a video ad. Some publishers are trying to have videos in-banner and claiming that’s video. To me, that’s not really a video ad. A video ad is when a user has chosen to watch a video on our platforms.

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Infographic: How Tech Marketers Are Using Content Marketing

Content Marketing Institute/ Marketing Profs/ International Data Group (IDG)

Below, is an infographic pulled from CMI’s B2B Content Marketing:  2014 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends, North America research.

This report highlights key areas of difference between the most effective technology marketers and their less effective peers. This infographic specifically focuses on content marketing volume, effectiveness, metrics and goals for technology marketers.

To download the original report, click here

CMI goals and effectiveness Infographic: How Tech Marketers Are Using Content Marketing

Latin America: Leaning on Mobile Tech in 2014

IDG Connect 0811 Latin America: Leaning on Mobile Tech in 2014

Mobile technology and communications appear to offer some bright prospects for Latin America in 2014, helping the region to accelerate its business infrastructure capacity as well as serving to improve education, healthcare and other services.

Unsurprisingly for what is perhaps the world’s most geographically and socially diverse region, the modern picture is mixed. In 2009 for example, Latin American countries were some of the lowest-ranked performers in the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a survey of learning systems all over the world. The effect on output, argued Stanford University senior fellow Eric Hanushek, was that Latin America was bumping along the bottom of the economic growth rankings along with Sub-Saharan Africa.

But Latin America is already a growing market that is attracting more attention from the traditional giants and others.

“Increased activity in the Latin American market has continued throughout 2013,” says analyst Jeff Paschke of analyst firm 451Research. “Technology providers such as IBM and Uruguayan Antel will continue to expand their datacentre footprints in the region to address a clear supply/demand imbalance.”

One fast track to improvement will be mobile. In November 2013, mobile industry trade body the GSMA revealed that 3.7% of Latin America’s GDP is generated through mobile technology, contributing $211bn to the region’s economy.

The problem is that mobile telcos are facing 2014 with a disincentive to invest. The voice services market is near saturation in some Latin American countries, limiting the scope for market growth, according to analysts. One of the steady sources of income for Latin American operators, the termination charges made for carrying calls from other networks, was recently stifled. When regulators recently slashed mobile termination rates, they took away up to a quarter of the revenue of some telcos, limiting the amount of money they have to invest in growth.

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