Events
Event Date Location

OMMA Display In LA

07/22/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Premium Display

07/22/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting @ Advertising Week

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

Small Agency Conference & Awards

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Austin TX

Strategic Advertising Sales Training 

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA RTB Real-Time Buying

07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

mobile

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

VentureBeat

Advertisers on Facebook see the emerging method of sequential mobile advertising as a way to better control their branding message with consumers on social media.

Sequential video advertising allows marketers to place targeted video ads in front of a user when they click an ad on their mobile device. Based on what the person clicks, and what the product or message is, marketers are then able to follow up with similar video ads as they hop from one device to another.

By creating a sequence of targeted ads, marketers can build up a pitch from one video to the next — starting with a “pitch” video and ending with a “sell” video intended to close the sale.

VentureBeat spoke to two sources who requested their names not be used because the information they were describing was based in conversations with Facebook executives.

“Video is where its going,” an advertising executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat. “With unique profile IDs, you have the ability to better sequentially target content for users as they embark on their journey through the social media funnel.”

The same executive added: “Sequential video advertisers gives marketers the ability to place different messages that can build upon each other. This gives you greater control over the delivery of your message.”

Another mobile executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat that advertisers want to better control, and deploy, product messages. But they are content, for now, in permitting Facebook and others obtain user data to target their ads.

For its part, Facebook uses a combination of its own in-house analytics and partners for the task of ad targeting.

Facebook is able to amass tremendous amounts of user data based on information contained in in its users’ profiles as well as their activity. That includes information on who you interact with and where you like to shop, for example. That data is gold to advertisers, keen to take advantage of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users.

“The writing is on the wall. Sequentially targeted ads are hugely efficient and ultimately cost effective. They have greater relevance for advertisers and better targeting,” said the second source, who has knowledge of Facebook’s mobile ad strategy.

“Anecdotally, it’s very promising. Facebook is putting a lot of effort into it,” the same source added.

Indeed, Facebook bought the video advertising outfit Liverail for an undisclosed sum earlier this month. Liverail’s technology optimizes video ad deliveries for mobile devices utilizing bidding and proprietary data. Liverail was considering an IPO this year but threw in its lot with Facebook instead, media reports said.

Read more…

US mobile e-commerce grows 19-fold

Warc

Mobile e-commerce sales in the US grew from $2.2bn in 2010 to $42.8bn in 2013 and are expected to increase to $50bn by the end of this year, new analysis has shown.

According to e-marketing services provider Custora, that represented growth of 1,875% from 2010 to 2013 while adding that the first quarter of 2014 alone generated $12.2bn in mobile e-commerce sales.

It found direct traffic was the primary driver of mobile phone e-commerce purchases (32.9%) while email marketing drove 26.7% compared to only 20.9% on desktop and 23.1% on tablet.

Organic search accounted for 16%, but social media accounted for less than 1% of mobile orders (0.6% via mobile phones and 0.2% via tablets).

Over a third (37%) of online store visits came via mobile devices by the end of Q1 2014, Custora said, up from 3.4% at the beginning of 2010.

Its analysis – based on over 70m consumers, 100 internet retailers and $10bn in transaction revenue – clearly outlined the growth of mobile, but also showed purchases via a desktop dominated conversation rates, Marketing Land reported.

From January 2013 to March 2014, desktops recorded an average e-commerce conversion rate of 4.3% compared to 2.8% for tablets and 1.4% for mobile phones.

Interestingly, Custora also found online consumers prefer to make their first purchase on a desktop, only moving to a mobile device for repeat purchases after establishing trust with the retailer.

Elsewhere, the study found only 12% of consumers used multiple devices to shop in Q1 2014, although the number doing so has tripled since 2012.

In order to reach these multi-device users, Custora CEO Corey Pierson advised brands to segment them according to the devices they use, Internet Retailer reported.

“The fastest-growing retail brands segment their customer bases and know that different customer segments have unique device preferences, which often translate to varied product category preferences and specific purchasing patterns,” he said.

LinkedIn tries again to keep people connected, with a redesigned app

IDG News Service

LinkedIn is trying again to build a service on mobile that helps keep people in touch, even when they’re not actively job hunting.

On Thursday the company launched a redesigned standalone app to do that, called Connected. It’s an overhaul of the company’s Contacts app, which launched last year but was not as interactive as the new service. People who have that app downloaded will be prompted to upgrade to the new app on Thursday.

The new app will focus on bringing updates about people’s connections to their mobile device. Events like job changes, work anniversaries or mentions in the news will show up as cards that people can swipe through left to right. Swipe up on a card to dismiss it. Reach the end of a series of cards, and LinkedIn might recommend some other people to connect with.

Users can interact with the cards like they might a Facebook post, such as with a “like,” a comment, or even a follow-up phone call.

The app is available in English for iOS, but plans are in the works for Android and international versions. People do not have to manually add again their existing contacts; they show up when they sign in with their LinkedIn credentials.

LinkedIn’s main service already provides updates on people in the feed on mobile and desktop, and through email notifications, in addition to content like news articles, sponsored posts, and job suggestions.

But the cards interface of the Connected app, and its singular focus on people, is different. The app won’t let users, for instance, edit their profiles, search for jobs, or follow companies. Think of it like checking Facebook or Twitter to see what your friends are up to, but in a professional context.

David Brubacher, head of relationships products at LinkedIn, called it a new way for people to invest in their network of connections. Specifically, LinkedIn hopes the app will give people an easier way to keep in touch with their connections, particularly if they don’t have time for a face-to-face meeting.

“This app helps you invest in your relationships today, so opportunities blossom for you tomorrow,” the company said in its announcement.

LinkedIn, in other words, is trying to make its service more of a destination like Facebook or Twitter, rather than a means to an end. That’s a tough goal though for a site aimed at professionals. Whether LinkedIn’s new service takes off may depend on whether people really want to check another app to stay up to date on people who may not all be close friends.

But the app also aims to provide some smarts, by letting people sync their phone’s contacts and calendar. If you enable notifications in the app, you can receive push notifications like reminder alerts before meetings, or prompts to follow up or connect with people on LinkedIn after.

Users will be able to adjust these notifications in their settings. “It’s not our goal to bombard you with push notifications throughout the day,” said Vinodh Jayaram, LinkedIn’s director of engineering.

Sharing On Twitter And Pinterest Leans Mostly Mobile

MediaPost

By now it’s clear that mobile and social have become more than a shotgun marriage.Findings from comScore last month showed that more than 70% of time spent in social media takes place on mobile devices (including tablets). And total mobile engagement on social is up 55% in the last year.

In its latest quarterly report, ShareThis took a closer look at sharing activity among top social platforms on mobile. Twitter and Pinterest emerge as the most mobile-centric networks, with 75% of all content sharing on those platforms happening in mobile. By comparison, half of sharing activity on Facebook is mobile.

However, because of Facebook’s size (1 billion monthly mobile users), it accounts for 72% of sharing on smartphones, versus 14% for Twitter, and 12% for Pinterest. On tablets, Facebook’s share falls to 64%, and Twitter’s to 7%, while Pinterest sees a bump to 22%. “There is a clear preference for channels based on different devices. Pinners are more active on tablets whereas tweeters flock to smartphones,” states ShareThis blog post today.

Furthermore, Facebook is where people go to share content about politics and parenting, while Twitter — because of its real-time DNA — leans toward sports and business, and Pinterest sharing is focused on shopping. That’s a natural outgrowth of Pinterest’s emphasis on visual presentation and consumer products.

In that vein, mobile users are twice as likely to interact with desktop content as any other category.

When it comes to mobile operating systems, Android users are more active on Facebook, while iOS users are more likely to share material on Twitter and Pinterest. In terms of demographic trends, sharing on tablets among people 55 and over nearly doubled over the first quarter. And 43% of social activity on tablets is driven by people in that age group.

Social interaction on mobile devices also grew 13% among African-Americans and 6% among Hispanics in the quarter. Overall, sharing from smartphones and tablets grew more than 30%, while that on the desktop fell 5% between the first and second quarter. The mobile gain was driven mainly by activity on smartphones, which was up about 28%.

Across desktop and mobile, Facebook accounted for almost two-thirds (64%) of sharing, with Twitter and Pinterest each claiming 9%. But the two smaller competitors together gained 2% share on Facebook from the prior quarter.

Coming soon: Mobile devices that can beam 4K video directly to TVs

IDG News Service

Smartphones and tablets will be able to transmit 4K video directly to big screens next year now that mobile chip maker Qualcomm has acquired Wilocity.

Wilocity makes chips based on WiGig technology, which wirelessly transfers data between devices at speeds of up to 7Gbps (bits per second) over a limited distance.

Qualcomm will integrate that technology in its 64-bit Snapdragon 810 mobile chip, it said Wednesday when it announced the acquisition. The first smartphones and tablets with WiGig will ship in the second half of next year, said Cormac Conroy, vice president of product management and engineering for Qualcomm’s Atheros division.

Device makers will ultimately decide if they want to use the WiGig chip in smartphones and tablets, a company spokeswoman said.

WiGig could spell the end of HDMI ports in mobile devices and also eliminate clutter and connectors required to transfer data or 4K video. WiGig is faster than Wi-Fi 802.11ac and LTE mobile broadband technologies, which are already in Snapdragon chips.

Qualcomm officials declined to say how much the company paid for Wilocity.

4K content is growing by the day and faster wireless data-transfer technologies are needed in mobile devices, Conroy said, adding it is the right time to integrate WiGig into Snapdragon.

Netflix has started streaming 4K video, and WiGig can turn mobile devices into media stations so streams can be dispatched to 4K TVs and displays. 4K video has a resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels, which is four times that of 1920 x 1080 pixel, high-definition video.

The utility of WiGig goes beyond 4K video. Intel wants to free PCs of wiresby 2016 with the use of WiGig to connect desktops to displays, wireless keyboards and mice. Intel also views WiGig as a preferred data-transfer technology for mobile devices over low-power Thunderbolt, which would involve connectors and wires.

Dell is using WiGig technology in a wireless laptop dock.

Mobile device users will be able to sync data with the cloud faster through WiGig, said Tal Tamir, vice president of product management at Qualcomm Atheros, and formerly CEO of Wilocity.

Data exchange between mobile devices and the cloud is heavier in the enterprise, and WiGig will provide low-power, multi-gigabit throughput, Tamir said.

With PC-like data transfer capabilities, mobile devices could come close to becoming full-fledged computers, Tamir said. But WiGig won’t replace wired connectors like USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt, which are widely used in computers, external storage devices, monitors and other peripherals.

WiGig has been around for years, but adoption has been slow. Qualcomm’s integration of the technology into smartphone and tablet chips should push adoption of the technology.

Mobile Facts To Keep In Mind – Part 1

Monday Note

By the end of 2014, many news media will collect around 50% of their page views via mobile devices. Here are trends to remember before devising a mobile strategy. (First of a two-part series.)

In the news business, mobile investments are on the rise. That’s the pragmatic response to a major trend: Users shift from web to mobile. Already, all major media outlets are bracing for a momentous threshold: 50% of their viewership coming from mobile devices (smartphones and tablets). Unfortunately, the revenue stream is not likely to follow anytime soon: making users pay for mobile content has proven much more difficult than hoped for. As for advertising, the code has yet to be cracked for (a) finding formats that won’t trigger massive user rejection, and (b) monetizing in ways comparable to the web (i.e. within the context of a controlled deflation). Let’s dive into a few facts:

Apps vs. WebApps or Mobile sites. A couple of years ago, I was among those who defended web apps (i.e. encapsulated HTML5 coding, not tied to a specific OS platform) vs. native apps (for iOS, Android, Windows Phone). The idea was to give publishers more freedom and to avoid the 30% app store levy. Also, every publisher had in mind the success enjoyed by the FT.com when it managed to put all its eggs in its web app and so retain complete control over the relationship with its customers.

All of the above remains true but, from the users’ perspective, facts speak loudly: According to Flurry Analytics, apps now account for 86% of the time spent by mobile users vs. 14% for mobile sites (including web apps.) A year ago, the balance was 80% for apps and 20% for mobile web.

Trend #1: Native apps lead the game
at the expense of web apps and mobile sites 

One remark, though: the result must take in account the weight of games and Facebook apps that account for 50% of the time spent on mobile. News-related usage leans more to mobile as there is not (yet) demand for complex rendering as in a gaming app. But as far news applications are concerned, we haven’t seen major breakthroughs in mobile web or web apps over the last months and it seems development is stalling.

News vs. the rest of the app world. On a daily total of 2hrs 50mn spent by mobile users (source: eMarketer), 2% to 5% of that time is spent on news. Once you turn to growth, the small percentage number starts to look better: The news segment is growing faster (+64% Y/Y) than messaging and social (+28%) or gaming and entertainment (+9% each); the fastest usage segment being the productivity apps (+119%) and that’s due to the transfer of professional uses from the desktop to the mobile.

Trend #2: On mobile, news is growing faster
than game or social 

…And it will grow stronger as publishers will deploy their best efforts to adjust contents and features to small screens and on-the-go usage and as mobile competitors multiply.

Click to read more…

Publishing in the drive-by media era

Digiday

There’s a recurring question among publishers as they try to catch up to consumers’ changing media habits: How does one convert readers who arrive through social and content-discovery channels into “repeat customers”? But for traditional publishers trying to catch up to the likes of BuzzFeed, Business Insider and Complex Media, this way of thinking is self-defeating. It creates an unattainable goal while more flexible competitors seize bigger shares of Web traffic and advertiser dollars.

Direct traffic, while highly valued, is little more than a myth. Once upon a time, there was direct traffic and referral traffic — and referral traffic was mostly search results. Then referral traffic expanded to include traffic from social media. Just as with search, social spawned a paid counterpart. Content recommendation and extension platforms like StumbleUpon, Digg, Outbrain and Taboola all came along and created new doors for traffic to walk through.

For any given publication, the same visitor can come through many channels. The same reader might visit a site five different ways in the course of a week — or even in the same day. Given that readers come in through so many channels, it’s difficult to measure conversion accurately.

Social and content discovery platforms typically have evolutionary life cycles and go through significant changes. The challenge for publishers is to be nimble enough to adapt to changes and diversify the ways they reach readers.

Meanwhile, however, apps have won over the mobile Web, which also has significant implications for publishers who still want to “acquire” visitors. Nielsen’s recent Cross-Platform Report shows that 89 percent of mobile monthly time spent is on apps. And only a select few categories of apps dominate: games, social media and communications platforms are the true victors in the fight for attention on mobile devices.

Additionally, the amount of time spent on mobile devices continues to grow while time spent with traditional media shrinks. Mobile has become the “second screen” during leisure time and the first screen for many business activities. Instead of browsing the Web the way they might on their desktops, users consume media from their news feeds and stay within app environments instead of using a browser.

As consumer time spent on mobile increases, publishers need to prioritize their presence on those mobile platforms. And if conversion is difficult on desktop, it will be even harder on mobile where users are even less likely to directly visit URLs.

Naturally, publishers dream of organic traffic, the kind that has an acquisition cost of zero. The more they cling to this dream, the harder time they will have competing for traffic.

Click to continue reading

Power in their hands? 4 challenges publishers should think about as opportunities

The Media Briefing

You’re entitled to an eye roll over the phrase “the power is firmly in their hands” when someone references the changing mobile landscape, but the phrase still stands.

We’re not the ones saying it this time, however, but rather IDG Global Solutions in their latest report/survey: The Mobile Evolution: Connecting Content.

More than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries were interviewed for the report, which focuses on four key areas:

  1. Tech choices
  2. Attention
  3. Video
  4. The evolving media landscape

1. Tech choices

As well as the simple technological fact that the internet is a two-way communication platform and doesn’t run on a broadcast model like print, radio, or television, it also means that communication has changed as our culture is always-on.

That always-on factor is being taken advantage of by companies looking to grab your attention wherever they can. Phone in your pocket? Not to worry, we’ll strap a mobile to your wrist and call it a smartwatch. Left your smartwatch at home? Not to worry, we’ll place a screen directly in front of your eyes so there’s no escape.

“The future is predicted to be omnichannel. People want to move seamlessly between devices wherever, whatever, whenever they want,” says the report, but we say it’s already here: smart TVs, tablets, mobiles, tablets, smartwatches and google glass are all evidence of different screens used in different ways that consumers are already using.

We’ll permit you another eyeroll at the phrase “The Internet of Things,” but it’s another point in the direction of omnichannel consumption habits.

2. Attention

Although placing screens directly in front of your eyes captures your attention pretty well, most people still don’t own Google Glass. More and more people are buying tablets, however: IDG reports that three years ago when they conducted the study only 20 percent of respondents said they owned a tablet. That figure is now 60 percent.

Capturing your audience’s attention is also harder than before. The disruptive nature of the internet has changed the way we communicate, too, especially for younger people, who text (up to 160 characters), Snapchat (up to 10 seconds), Instagram (up to 15 seconds), Tweet (up to 140 characters), and Emoji (we’re coining the verb) in short bursts.

Continue reading…

Why you shouldn’t treat mobile like display

iMedia Connection

Mobile advertising has grown dramatically over the past few years, predicated on the fact that mobile has become the principal place people go for entertainment, news, social media, checking email, and buying things. U.S. mobile ad spending this year will also surge 75 percent to nearly $8 billion, with Google pocketing half of that, according to eMarketer estimates. Mobile ads will account for more than 50 percent of Facebook revenue by year end. Half the U.S. population will be carrying smartphones in 2014.

While these stats will get any marketer giddy about mobile, treating the channel the same way as one might look at fixed web is a mistake some advertisers have done in the past. Depending on the brand, campaign, platforms, KPIs, and so forth, the strategy for mobile may need be evaluated independently as part of the holistic campaign. Due to the nuances of mobile, here are a few areas to take into consideration:

The mobile campaigns and goals

On outbound initiatives, it is important to set realistic goals based on the objective of the investment. Due to the nature of mobile, advertisers need to consider how users engage with their devices and how different their behavior is compared to display.

Mobile users have a tendency to religiously check their phones for social media updates, news, emails, and entertainment much more frequently than desktop. Those mobile users (as the name suggests) will have that device in their pocket or purse and be taking it with them everywhere. Display users are more stationary at work, home, or school and not as “mobile”. Not surprisingly, these users will also tend to have very different behavior at work on their desktops versus their personal mobile devices.

With that in mind, here are a few high level suggestions for mobile advertisers:

First things first, have a mobile optimized page
Mobile requires that you not only have the right kind of content, but also a lighter weight landing page that is amenable to a wide range of mobile devices being serviced. Having a site that is too heavy may cause mobile pages to load slowly (or not at all) and may push a user to give up on the page and go elsewhere. Not everyone has the latest mobile device, so make sure people can operate on your landing pages.

Direct response campaign
If your brand is trying to generate transactions, leads, downloads, or any other activity, it is important to think about how a mobile user would realistically complete that action. Advertisers should note that mobile users do not have the same kind of tolerance that display users have for long form fields or multi-step calls to action. This means that advertisers should streamline this process. In some cases, it may be preferable to collect abbreviated details about a user and have him or her complete the rest later (perhaps on a laptop).

Read more…

Microsoft, Apple, and Google battle for the mobile enterprise

CITEworld

The past three months have seen a whirlwind of announcements for enterprise mobility. MicrosoftApple, and Google all had their respective developer conferences. It’s never been clearer: All three are positioning themselves to battle for dominance of the mobile business market.

Although BlackBerry also squeezed in an announcement about its new partnership with Amazon that will bring the Amazon Appstore to BlackBerry 10 devices, the company is struggling for relevance as consumers continue to eschew the platform. While BlackBerry will continue to be a player in high-security markets, it’s unlikely to recapture a dominant position in the overall enterprise space now that end users have much choice and control over what devices they want to use at work.

What’s interesting is that Microsoft, Apple, and Google are all approaching the enterprise market in different ways. Each is playing to its strengths.

The incumbent

Apple has already managed to secure much of the enterprise mobility market. There are many factors that led to Apple’s dominance, but some key ones include Apple’s early introduction of enterprise security features in iOS, an ongoing expansion of those features, having a more mature platform on the market sooner than Android and Windows Phone, a closed ecosystem that resists malware, and the premium user experience that has been the hallmark of Apple for the last decade or more.

Apple has another big advantage: It’s always retained complete control of iOS as a platform. Apple has strict control over the hardware, OS, and app ecosystem that defines iOS. Microsoft and Google have both relied on third parties to create devices that run their platforms. Although both companies are, in their own ways, taking some steps to rein in the platform fragmentation that this has created, minimizing the impact of that fragmentation isn’t going to happen overnight.

Even if Google’s efforts with Android L succeed in tamping down security-related fragmentation, Apple may still have an edge here in terms of end user support. There have been just eight iPhone models ever made (likely to become ten this fall) and just seven iPads. That makes things much easier for helpdesk and other support professionals to troubleshoot than the wide swath of Android devices that BYOD users may bring into the office.

Windows tablets and phones may fare better than Google from a support perspective because many IT departments already support and troubleshoot Windows PCs and transferring those support skills onto mobile devices may be easier and more efficient.

Being the incumbent in the race, Apple also has the advantage of inertia — organizations that have managed to standardize around iOS are likely to see an advantage in staying the course. Part of that is because the institutional knowledge and solutions to secure and integrate iOS are already present, which means generally lower overhead in mandating or preferring iOS over other platforms.

Click to continue reading