Events
Event Date Location

OMMA Display In LA

07/22/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting @ Advertising Week

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

Small Agency Conference & Awards

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Austin TX

Strategic Advertising Sales Training 

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA RTB Real-Time Buying

07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

OMMA mCommerce

08/07/2014 New York New York

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Surface survives Microsoft cuts, but tablet strategy remains muddled

IDG News Service

As Microsoft announced its largest layoffs in its 39-year history — while saying it would press forward with its in-house Surface — analysts contended that the firm still hasn’t clearly stated its tablet strategy.

Earlier today, Microsoft said it would cut up to 18,000 jobs, or 14% of its work force, with the bulk of those layoffs coming from streamlining efforts after acquiring much of phone-maker Nokia.

The layoffs begin immediately, but as many as 5,000 will be left on tenterhooks for up to a year before knowing whether their jobs are safe.

Along with the layoffs, Microsoft also signaled an end to its experiment with Android, which powered the Nokia X series of smartphones. Nokia had kicked off the line prior to the deal’s completion.

“We plan to shift select Nokia X product designs to become Lumia products running Windows,” CEO Satya Nadella said in a message to employees.

Surface, the tablet-one-moment-notebook-the-next hardware that Microsoft debuted two years ago, will survive, the company made clear.

“With a set of changes already implemented earlier this year in these teams, this means there will be limited change for the Surface, Xbox hardware, PPI/meetings or next generation teams,” wrote Stephen Elop, the head of Microsoft’s device division, in a separate, much longer email to workers.

Nor, apparently, has Microsoft’s Surface strategy changed.

“More broadly across the Devices team, we will continue our efforts to bring iconic tablets to market in ways that complement our OEM partners, power the next generation of meetings [and] devices, and thoughtfully expand Windows with new interaction models,” Elop said.

While some on Wall Street have urged Microsoft to dump the Surface — and the Xbox for that matter — to focus on more profitable services and software, industry analysts contacted by Computerworld today weren’t surprised that the tablet/notebook survived the cuts.

“I’m not surprised that Microsoft is keeping Surface,” said Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy, in an email today. “While it doesn’t fit 100% with ‘mobility and cloud,’ it’s close enough to keep it as it supports them driving their expanded definition of productivity by tying hardware, software and services.”

Others agreed.

“No, I didn’t think that they’d dump it,” echoed Wes Miller of Directions on Microsoft, a Kirkland, Wash. research firm that focuses on the moves of nearby Microsoft. “Some people thought Microsoft would use this opportunity to ax the Surface, but it’s a big long-term bet for them. And the Surface Pro 3 sure seems to be a lot more popular than the earlier models.”

Microsoft started selling the third-generation Surface Pro 3 – an Intel processor-powered device that runs Windows 8.1 — last month, and will finish rolling out the line in two weeks. The Surface Pro 3 starts at $799, but costs $929 with a keyboard, a necessary add-on to fit the notebook replacement role that Microsoft markets.

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Delay Of Large iPhone Is The Best Possible News For Samsung

Business Insider

Until yesterday, Samsung’s worst nightmare was coming true.

Sales are down 10%, in large part because cheap Chinese Android knockoffs are cannibalizing the low end of Samsung’s mobile-phone shares. Apple’s sales are accelerating while Samsung’s are faltering. And Samsung’s one advantage over Apple — the fact that it offers two large-screen phones in the high-end market where Apple has none — is about to be wiped out by Apple’s new iPhone 6 phablet, expected in September.

And some consumers are likely holding off on buying large-screen phones as they wait to see what Apple will unveil in its fall launch. Samsung has cut its orders for parts for its Galaxy line in Q3 2014.

In short, Apple had Samsung exactly where it wants it: Losing sales, poised to lose share, and with consumers hesitant about buying a new Samsung until they see what iPhone 6 looks like.

But then last night we learned that Apple may not, after all, have a 5.5 inch version of the iPhone 6 ready to go. The 4.7-inch version is still coming, but the super-size iPhone 6 looks like it’s on hold.

As the comparison chart above showing the iPhone lineup next to Samsung’s products tells, a 4.7-inch iPhone 6 (reportedly is ready for launch) is only a tad larger than the iPhone 5S. It’s significantly smaller than the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Note 3. If Apple only launches a 4.7-inch iPhone 6 in September, then Samsung will remain as the premier phablet maker for people who want large screens.

Apple was poised to deliver a killer blow to Samsung. But now it seems Samsung has gotten a reprieve.

The 5.5-inch iPhone 6 is delayed because it is turning out to be harder to manufacture because of touch-sensitivity issues near the edge of the phone. The phablet iPhone 6 may not arrive until next year, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. That explains why, for months, we’ve been seeing leaked iPhone 6 parts for a 4.7-inch phone but not a 5.5-inch phone.

This, basically, is the best news Samsung could have hoped to hear. It now has an extended window to persuade people who need to upgrade their phones that in fact, for maybe as much as the next six months, if you want a big phone you gotta go to Samsung — because Apple doesn’t have a really big phone.

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The Four Most Surprisingly Useful Features In iOS 8

Fast Company

It’s tempting to think of iOS 8 as a more polished version of iOS 7; when you first install the update, there’s no visual cue that anything is different. But iOS 8 packs a long list of new features, some of which we’re still digging up weeks later. But what else is really new and worthwhile here? After thoroughly testing out the new OS, there were four such features that really stuck out.

1) Audio Messaging

I’m not fond of dictating my texts, yet I find the new quick audio feature in Messages to be addictive.

Activated by holding down the microphone icon, the feature immediately starts recording an audio message, which is then sent by sliding your finger up on the screen. If you misspoke (or are having second thoughts about drunk voice-texting your ex) you can use the familiar leftward swipe gesture to delete it before it sends. I suspect that once people try it, the tap, hold, and flick-to-send routine will become familiar.

Sending audio text messages isn’t for every situation–it’s still awkward to dictate messages while standing in line at Chipotle–but there are a lot of lazy situations in which it’s perfect. I found using it around the house, audio being a lot more convenient when doing chores. And because it doesn’t transcribe the note into text like Siri, there’s no need to correct spelling, which is especially nice when you’re behind the wheel.

2) Predictive Texting

Making texting even easier is the predictive text capabilities of the new keyboard. It’s one of the most noticeable new additions, thanks to the hard-to-miss row of words it appends right above the keyboard.

The QuickType feature–which lets you a few letters and tapping a word, typing a few more letters and selecting another–is a toss-up. Some might like it, while others might ignore it in favor of the way they’ve always typed on iOS. The place really comes in handy, however, is when replying to incoming messages.

For example, my wife sent me a few questions from the store and instead of having to type the answers, the choices were pre-populated. For the times messages are utilitarian in nature, the predictive text will be your best friend. Answering questions will be a delight, plus the predictive element learns how you speak to different contacts and tailors the responses accordingly. In this regard, messaging with iOS 7 will feel like a huge chore once you’ve used iOS 8.

3) Better App Store

After six years the App Store has seen its fair share of criticism. It’s also pretty clear the App Store is too big too do a good job and make everyone happy. The updates made to it in iOS 8, however, are pretty nice.

Visually, icons are bigger and items are spaced a little better, but overall it remains similar. The biggest complaint–which Apple is trying to address–is discoverability. Third-party apps make the iPhone experience. In iOS 8, surfacing new apps in the App Store feels a lot easier.

Google’s Play store has a similar problem: Once you highlight dozens of apps in different ways, the results can be overwhelming for users. One way the iOS 8 App Store tries to change this is by making it easier to drill down into specific interests.

There’s a new “explore” button now which combines previous efforts into one area. Front and center under explore is apps “Popular Near Me,” while the categories underneath help to separate the sub-division out more. Tapping “Music,” for example, produced a long list including “Apps For Learning Music,” “Lyrics,” and “Radio.” All very different types of apps that still fall under the broad music category.

Another subtle, but helpful addition is under the search button. Without typing anything, the first thing you see is a list of trending searches. This has already proved useful, not to mention interesting. Revision: Once you search for something, the store displays a list of items related to your query, further improving app discovery.

The tweaks might seem small, but they could be enough to help people find apps they might not have otherwise.

4) Spotlight

Spotlight finally feels like it’s reached the level of maturity it was destined for since its introduction. Integrating things like App Store searches, iTunes music, nearby places, and news rounds out thesearch box nicely.

In practice, it’s the first time I feel like I have a go-to place on iOS to quickly type things and at least get close enough to what I’m looking for. I was concerned Safari had too many desktop metaphors to be a useful mobile browser, but in combination with Spotlight’s new capabilities, the two work well together.

Spotlight in iOS 7 often came up short, focusing mostly onlocal search. Now in iOS 8, if I search for an app I need, it doesn’t matter if it’s on the phone or not because Spotlight will find it on the app store if it’s not local. Same for music, it doesn’t matter if a song is in my library or not because searching will still find it in iTunes.

The important improvement in Spotlight is that I don’t have to think about whether I need to search online or locally on my phone because the two are much more intertwined now.

I’d still love to see more refinement and work on Spotlight going forward, but in practice it’s much more useful than it’s ever been before.

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CIO.com Enhances Design and Functionality for a Consistent Visitor and Advertiser Experience Across Smartphones, Tablets and Desktops

IDG News Service

 IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company composed of Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—reveals an enhanced design and greater functionality for CIO.com.  The award-winning site incorporates responsive design technology to scale editorial and advertising content to the user’s screen size, whether they are accessing CIO.com with a smartphone, tablet or desktop. 
“Technology decision-makers are mobile and want the flexibility to search for information no matter what tools they have access to at that moment,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO, IDG Enterprise. “This consistent experience allows our visitors to get the information they need from CIO.com to keep their businesses agile, no matter when or where a question arises.”
Website Enhancements Include: 

  • CIO.com enhanced through use of responsive design, including HTML5 and CSS3, to ensure usability and consistency for visitors using smartphones, tablets or desktops.    
  • High-quality content remains the key focus, while further showcasing the author. Additionally, hand-curated content pages will be incorporated on trending technologies such as Healthcare and Consumer Tech.
  • Visually enticing design with more prominent graphics and less pagination for a smoother reading experience, while maintaining ad impression impact.
  • Increased integration of social sharing tools for enhanced community building.
  • New navigation tools to optimize reader time-onsite, including lists showing what’s trending at the moment, a drop-down menu showcasing what other visitors are reading, and the top stories as selected by CIO editors.
  • Single, searchable “Resource Library” supporting all types of lead-generation content.
  • Shared functionality across IDG Enterprise sites for seamless execution of banner ads, lead generation and native advertising, making promotions more effective.

CIO.com’s editorial voice, content and design remains unique to the brand, while functionality has been aligned across IDG Enterprise sites including back-end capabilities enhancing search functionality and digital asset management for displaying more images and video content.  Navigation has migrated to a menu icon, next to the website logo, where visitors can navigate to key sections. Ads and promotional units are highlighted in a “deconstructed” right rail optimizing effectiveness and native advertising will be threaded intuitively throughout the site.

“The recent changes support the goals of CIO.com in that it is now more of a community for our readers to engage with our award-winning content as well as with their peers & industry leaders socially,” said Brian Carlson, editorial director/editor in chief, CIO.com. “The new site emphasizes our trusted, expert writers who our audience looks to when investigating technologies for their day-to-day needs.”   

Infographic: Generation X just as tech savvy as millenials

The Drum

Millenials and generation X have equally migrated to mobile devices, with 65 percent of millennials using a tablet simultaneously with another device, and generation X following closely at 60 per cent, according to the latest IDG Global Mobile Survey.

The report, which surveyed 23,500 people across 43 countries, found that there aren’t major differences in mobile device adoption between the two generations.

Millenials, which encompasses those in the 18 to 34 age group, and generation X, those aged 35 and over, showed similar behaviour when it came to using a tablet to read newspapers – 53 per cent and 40 per cent respectively.

The research also found that 83 per cent and 82 per cent of millennials and generation X respectively use Facebook on their smartphones, while 92 per cent of millennials watch videos on tablets compared with 83 per cent of generation X.

millenials vs genx final Infographic: Generation X just as tech savvy as millenials

Digital News Finally As Popular As Newspapers In The UK

TechCrunch

Reports of the death of print have been greatly accelerated, judging by research from UK telecoms watchdog Ofcom.

The research has found that in the UK digital news, consumed via apps or websites, has only just reached parity with news consumed via ink and dead trees.

Yep those old media newspaper thingies are surprisingly sticky — and not just in the way their column inches adhere to one’s fingers.

Ofcom found that around 41% of people say they now access news on websites and apps — up significantly from around a third (32%) last year.

But despite digital news’ rising popularity, rates of newspaper usage are remaining steady overall — unchanged at four in 10 people (40%), year on year. However Ofcom’s report does note a decline in print readership “particular among the under-35s” over the past year.

Both newspapers and apps still massively trail the UK’s main source of news: the TV, although once you segment Brits by age then digital platforms come out as the primary news source for the younger age group (16 to 24).

Overall, Ofcom found that 75% of respondents identified the TV as their primary news source, down slightly from 78% in 2013. The research also notes a fall in people saying a particular TV channel is their most important source for news (down to 54% from 62% in 2013).

Ofcom says the rising popularity of digital news is being driven by increased mobile and tablet usage among younger Brits.

Some 60% of these younger Brits said they are consuming digital news in 2014, up from 44% last year. And around 45% of this age group said websites or apps are their most important sources for news, up from 30% in 2013.

The research also found that young Brits are 10x more likely than those aged 55 and over to access news on a mobile (40% vs just 4%), and twice as likely to access news via a tablet (15% vs 7%).

The converse is true when it comes to TV news — with older Brits consuming considerably more hours per year of TV news than younger Brits. Ofcom found that the over 55s watch an average of 196 hours of TV news each year vs just 27 hours for 16-24 year olds, who in turn watch 88 fewer hours of TV news than the average UK adult (115 hours a year).

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Putting the Spotlight on the Mobile Evolution

Digital Marketing Magazine

A new Global Mobile Survey, from IDG Global Solutions (IGS), has put a spotlight on the evolution of mobile in the biggest study of consumer and business’ use of mobile devices.

The survey highlights a dramatic increase in mobile video consumption with 74% of consumers use a smartphone to watch online videos compared with 61% in 2012. Additionally, mobile is replacing traditional media as 50% of respondents use a tablet to read newspapers and 40% have replaced either the desktop or laptop with a tablet device.

The boundaries between business and personal life are becoming increasingly blurred as 80% of all respondents research products or services for business on a tablet in the evening. However, a lack of mobile enabled websites and concerns about security remain the biggest barriers to the growth of purchases on smartphone.

The survey, conducted among more than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries, focuses on four key areas:

Mobile Executives: How executives use mobile devices – especially for business

Mobile Business: How and when audiences research and purchase products on mobile devices

Mobile Millennials vs. Generation X: Differences in consumer behaviour across video, social and commerce

Mobile Lifestyle: How audiences use multiple screens, socialise and buy on mobile devices

The research also reveals that video consumption has become pervasive on mobile devices with 75% of respondents using smartphones and 87% tablets to watch online video. Millennials and C-Suite executives meanwhile are near equal consumers of tablet video with 92% of 18- to 24-year-olds while 91% of senior executive (CEO/COO/Chairman/President) reporting they watch video on their tablet. Both audiences access all kinds of video content, including YouTube, movies, TV shows and training guides, although senior executives are twice as likely as Millennials to watch promotional videos.

Christina Carstensen, IDG Global Solutions, said: “The ‘mobile evolution’ is having a profound effect on consumers and businesses. It has kick-started the ‘always-on’ culture, presenting brands with unprecedented opportunities to develop closer relationships with their customers. We have moved beyond media convergence to a convergence of technology and humans, and brands more than ever need to show their human side to communicate in a relevant, engaging and intuitive way.”

Mobile Executives

For senior executives, smartphones are a critical business tool. The majority of senior executives (92%) own a smartphone used for business with 77% reporting they use their smartphone to research a product or service for their business. While the majority (93%) go on to purchase that product via the Internet using a laptop or desktop, 50% of these executives have purchased IT products for business using their smartphone with 13% reporting making a purchase between $1,000 to $4,999 USD. (£600–2,999; €700–3,499).

Security concerns (45%) and having a website not mobile enabled (43%) were the most common reasons for this audience not to purchase a product via smartphone. Like mainstream consumers, senior executives want an omni-channel purchase environment to seamlessly move between devices to make IT purchases.

Mobile for Business

Tablet ownership has exploded among survey respondents rising from 20% in 2011 to 61% in 2014. In Latin America, 41% of respondents said their tablet had replaced their laptop computer with 59% reporting using their tablet device to purchase IT products for their business, the highest percentage of all regions surveyed. Software and computer accessories were the IT products most frequently purchased for business across all regions, reflecting significant opportunity for IT companies willing to invest in mobile commerce innovations such as shoppable video.

Millennials vs. Generation X

Nearly all respondents aged 18-34 owned a smartphone and 91% of 18-24 year olds and 85% of 25-34 year olds used social networking sites and apps on their smartphone. Only 38% of 18-24 year olds owned a tablet, however. Tablet ownership jumps to 55% among 25 to 34 year olds and 65% report using another device or screen, primarily television (83%) at the same time as their tablet.

To reach these audiences, tech marketers are now competing with mainstream brands on Facebook or trying to grab their audience’s attention during television programs. B2B brands investing in quality social content or video with high production values comparable to television are most likely to engage young influencers and stimulate social media shares.

Mobile Tech Lifestyle: Multitasking

The majority of Global Mobile Survey respondents are multitasking: 61% use another device at the same times as their tablet and 58% use another device at the same time as their smartphone. In both cases the majority of activity on these devices is unrelated.

 

More than half of 25 to 34-year olds have a tablet, says new research

CNET

Tablets are replacing computers, according to new figures, as we voraciously eat up online video from YouTube to Netflix.

Industry analysts IDG polled 23,500 people across 43 countries about their use of mobile devices. The survey focuses on the habits of business executives as well as comparing the behaviour of members of generation X — people roughly in their thirties to fifties — with younger millenials, who largely grew up with the Internet.

Nearly everybody surveyed owned a smartphone. Older people are more likely to own a tablet: more than half of 25 to 34-year olds have an iPad or similar device, but only a third of 18 to 24-year olds can say the same.

40 percent of those surveyed have replaced their desktop computer or laptop with a tablet. They don’t just use their tablet for checking Facebook and watching cat videos on YouTube: a whopping 80 percent admit to using their tablet for work-related research in the evenings.

Video tasty

IDG highlights the explosion in video watched on mobile devices in recent years, including phones and tablets. Three quarters of respondents use a smartphone to watch online videos, up from 61 per cent in 2012.

One of the reasons the growth in mobile video watching is significant is that video requires more data sent to a device — especially if it’s in high definition — which uses more bandwidth. As a result, mobile phone networks reckon video puts a strain on their network.

During the World Cup, for example, soccer fans have turned to their phones or tablets to follow games kicking off at times when they’re at work or out of the house. EE, the UK’s first 4G network, saw record traffic generated by streaming online video. The biggest spikes involved coverage of England’s ill-fated game against Uruguay and replays of Australian superstar Tim Cahill’s stunning volleyed goal against Holland.

Despite these figures on tablet use, other analysts have suggested that tablet sales could be impacted by phablets, as consumers plump for a smartphone with a video-friendly larger screen rather than buying a phone and tablet separately.

Mobile Shopping Drives UK Retail Ecommerce Sales

eMarketer

Shopping on mobile devices will account for a rapidly growing share of UK retail ecommerce sales and is expected to contribute to strong ecommerce sales growth this year, according to new figures from eMarketer. Already, over one-quarter of all online sales in the UK take place via smartphones and tablets; by 2018, that figure will near two in five.

174083 Mobile Shopping Drives UK Retail Ecommerce Sales

 eMarketer estimates that UK retail ecommerce sales will rise 16.0% this year, helped by an improving economy, shoppers’ increasing use of mobile devices for making purchases, and expanded options for purchase delivery. Total retail sales in the UK, by contrast, will grow by just 3.6% in 2014, and movement will slow after that. Meanwhile, the growth trajectory for mcommerce sales is even steeper, with a predicted 64.8% rise this year.

“Mcommerce is seeing such good growth for a couple of reasons: Mobile device ownership is rising rapidly, and consumers are becoming more comfortable making purchases on these devices. Tablets, in particular, offer a larger and more tactile interface for online shopping, which is why we’re seeing particularly fast growth in tablet commerce,” explained Bill Fisher, UK analyst at eMarketer.

Retail sales on tablets are growing considerably faster than those on smartphones in the UK, even though smartphone usage is far more common than tablet usage. Tablets—with their larger, more inviting screens and their general use at home in the evenings, typically via broadband connection—will contribute roughly double the level of sales than smartphones will this year, accounting for nearly two-thirds of total UK mcommerce sales.

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As iPhone thefts drop, Google and Microsoft plan kill switches on smartphones

IDG News Service

Responding to more than a year of pressure, Google and Microsoft will follow Apple in adding an anti-theft “kill switch” to their smartphone operating systems, U.S. law enforcement officials will announce later Thursday.

The commitment will be disclosed alongside new data that shows a dramatic drop in theft of Apple iPhones and iPads after the September 2013 introduction of iOS 7, which included a kill-switch function that allows stolen devices to be remotely locked and deleted so they become useless.

In New York, iPhone theft was down 19 percent in the first five months of this year, which is almost double the 10 percent drop in overall robberies seen in the city. Over the same period, thefts of Samsung devices — which did not include a kill switch until one was introduced on Verizon-only models in April — rose by over 40 percent.

In San Francisco, robberies of iPhones were 38 percent lower in the six months after the iOS 7 introduction versus the six months before, while in London thefts over the same period were down by 24 percent. In both cities, robberies of Samsung devices increased.

“These statistics validate what we always knew to be true, that a technological solution has the potential to end the victimization of wireless consumers everywhere,” San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon told IDG News Service.

Gascon and New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman have been leading a push to get smartphone vendors and telecom carriers to include kill switches in their products as a way to curb phone theft.

The joint work had early success with Apple but other carriers and phone makers dragged their feet. However, resistance to the idea appears to be dropping as several bills that mandate kill switches make their way through state legislatures and the U.S. Congress.

The bills demand a function that would enable a phone owner to remotely delete and disable a phone if stolen. The function could be disabled by consumers before a theft takes place if desired, but crucially new handsets would be supplied with it switched on by default.

Gascon and Schneiderman believe that if most phones had a kill switch, thefts would drop because the probability of a stolen phone remaining useful and thus having value would greatly diminish.

The two said the data being released on Thursday appears to “validate the kill switch as an effective part of a multi-layered approach to combatting smartphone crimes.” Although it’s worth remembering that crime is a complex subject and other factors could have contributed to the fall in Apple-related thefts or the rise in those of Samsung phones.

“We must ensure these solutions are deployed in a more effective manner that does not rely on consumers to seek them out an turn them on, but the fact that virtually the entire industry has responded to our call to actionA is anA indication that we are well on our way toA ending this public safety crisis,” Gascon said.