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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Snapchat’s Discover Publishers Are Asking for Big Ad Rates — And They’re Getting Them

Recode

Snapchat’s Discover platform is one of the hottest properties in media. That’s why Snapchat and its publishing partners are asking for very high prices for ads that run on Discover — and why marketers are paying them.

Industry sources say Discover ad pricing is running around $100 for every thousand views — a rate that’s something like twice what a premium video publisher can get, and many times what a mere Web publisher can command. Perhaps that’s why Alibaba felt comfortable putting $200 million into Snapchat, at a reported $15 billion valuation.

Snapchat launched Discover in late January. It’s a new section of the app where users can watch videos or read stories from a dozen different publishers like CNN, Vice or ESPN.

Snapchat publishers set their own rates and provide a guaranteed view count to ad buyers based on traffic patterns they’ve established in the last few weeks. Industry sources say that on average, publishers are getting around 10 cents a view for their ads, which are seen anywhere from 500,000 times a day to a million times a day. That means publishers are able to command $50,000 to $100,000 a day for their stuff.

The publishers and Snapchat split the revenue differently depending on who sells the ad. If a publisher sells the ad space, they get 70 percent of the revenue; if Snapchat sells the ad, the revenue is split evenly.

Publishers can also bundle the Snapchat buys with inventory on other platforms if they sell it themselves; sources say ESPN’s sales force is taking this tactic, and has been able to sell Discover ads for more than $100,000 a day.

Since Discover is brand-new — Snapchat itself is only four years old — a lot of this pricing and ad buying is experimental. And prices usually run high in the early days of new properties, while publishers and marketers identify a proper balance.

Continue Reading… 

Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

IDG Connect 0811 Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

Large buying teams and mixed constituencies make it more difficult to sell effectively. Buyers are people first, buying team members second which causes emotion-based goals influence buying decisions.

IDG Connect’s emotional and buyer personas research has found that emotion plays a critical role in the decision making process.

This infographic outlines:

  • The 3 distinct persona types in buying teams
  • Why it pays to arm to the advocates
  • 4 Steps to leverage emotion in your persona pursuit

EmotionalMarketing Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

Download full infographic here…

What Is 5G, and What Does It Mean for Consumers?

Recode

In a few years, you may be able to download a full-length HD movie to your phone in a matter of seconds rather than minutes. And video chats will be so immersive that it will feel like you can reach out and touch the other person right through the screen.

At least, that’s what the wireless companies envision for the future of mobile. While many parts of the world are still awaiting the rollout of 4G networks, the telecom industry is already looking ahead to the next generation of cellular technology, called 5G.

 What Is 5G, and What Does It Mean for Consumers?

It was a big topic of discussion at the Mobile World Congress show last week, where companies like Nokia Networks, Huawei and Ericsson talked about what each is doing in the area of 5G and the possibilities it will create. (MWC is an annual event in Barcelona where the wireless industry comes together to show off the latest devices and technologies.)

But as an emerging technology, there are a lot of questions surrounding 5G. What is it exactly? How will it work? How will it affect consumers?

I asked industry experts, as well as companies like Nokia and Huawei, for their takes on 5G. Most agreed: The technology is still a long way from becoming a reality, but it has the potential to completely change the way we interact with wireless devices, from the smartphones in our pockets to the cars we drive.

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5 Tips For Mobile Video

Journalism.co.uk

Mobile and video are two buzzwords of digital journalism from recent years, but there were initial doubts over whether they could be combined successfully.

As screen sizes have grown and internet connectivity improved, the concept is no longer in question.

Mobile was the focus at last week’s Online News Association event in London, and Cameron Church, director of digital video company Stream Foundations and previously of Brightcove, discussed his work in helping news publishers make the most out of their video offering, especially on mobile.

He shared his thoughts and advice on the subject.

‘You are not your audience’

“Unless you sit there and click play a million times a day or week,” said Church, “you’re not going to be the one that gets to choose what works or doesn’t work.”

While producers or journalists may sit in their cosy, stationary editing suite or at a desk, the audience is out watching video on the move.

Editors still need to “empower creative spirit,” he said, “but rein them in a little bit because they have to get back into real connection” with serving their audience.

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Vietnam Smartphones Increase by 57% in 2014, Says IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Vietnam Smartphones Increase by 57% in 2014, Says IDC

A total of 28.7 million mobile phones were shipped to Vietnam in 2014, reflecting an annual growth rate of 13% year-on-year (YoY), according to IDC’s Asia/Pacific Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, 2014 Q4. Smartphones enjoyed the highest growth with total shipments of 11.6 million units, reflecting a YoY growth of 57%. Smartphones also represented 41% of all mobile phones shipped to Vietnam last year and are expected to eclipse feature phones in 2015.

“Rapidly declining smartphone prices has led to the rise of smartphone penetration rates in Vietnam throughout 2014,” says Võ Lê Tâm Thanh, Senior Market Analyst, Mobile Devices at IDC Vietnam. “The low-cost segment has been the main driver, with six out of ten smartphones as budget models priced below US$150 are shipped to Vietnam.”

Samsung remained the king of Vietnam smartphone market although its market share has fallen considerably over the past few years, from 54% in 2012 to 26% in 2014. Nokia/Microsoft on the other hand continued to grow strongly in Vietnam, climbing from 16% in 2013 to 24% in 2014.

prVN25480615 1 254826 Vietnam Smartphones Increase by 57% in 2014, Says IDC

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Brands still look to print

Warc

Major brands may be devoting increasing attention to digital but print advertising, whether in the form of circulars, catalogues or magazine spreads, remains a stalwart beloved of consumers.

Last year, for example, circulars generated $5.84bn in revenue for US newspapers and accounted for around 20% of their advertising revenue according to figures from market research firm Borrell Associates.

“Retailers are constantly testing alternatives to circulars,” Gerry Storch, the chief executive of the Hudson’s Bay Co, told the Wall Street Journal. “The difficulty is finding something as effective,”

A single run of a newspaper circular can cost as much as $1m and digital, the most obvious alternative, hasn’t grabbed consumers in the way retailers would have hoped.

Figures from Wanderful Media, a business dedicated to helping retailers connect with local shoppers, suggest that 80% of people who read a print newspaper also look at the circulars inside, but less than 1% of online readers click through to digital circulars.

So even though local newspapers may be in difficulty, digital advertising is unlikely to replace what retailers lose from print when one shuts down.

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CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data and Analytics Initiatives

Dataversity

A new article reports, “IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analyticsresearch, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.”

The article goes on, “Deployment of data-driven projects has increased by 125% in the past year, with 27% of organizations already in deployment. The momentum continues with an additional 42% of organizations still planning implementation. As more ITDMs deploy data initiatives, it provides clarity into the amount of data that needs to be managed. Similar to 2014, organizations are currently managing an average of 167.3TB of data, and this amount is expected to increase by 48% over the next 12 to 18 months. The largest contributors to this data growth are customer databases (63%), emails (61%), and transactional data (53%).”

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IDG’s Chief Content Officer: Separate Content Marketing From Marketing

Huffington Post

Since our first CXOTalk show launched in 2013 with Guy Kawasaki, I have interviewed 12 startup founders/CEOs, 15 Fortune 250 executives, 28 Chief Information Officers, 10 technology analysts including Group Vice Presidents from Gartner and IDC, seven venture capitalists, six bestselling authors, one Emmy award winner, one Brigadier General and one NBA team owner. After hosting our 100th episode last week, we can now add to that impressive guest roster, our first Chief Content Officer, John Gallant of IDG Communications.

2015 03 07 1425738085 6610421 123north thumb IDGs Chief Content Officer: Separate Content Marketing From Marketing
John Gallant, Chief Content Officer – IDG Media US

As Chief Content Officer for the largest technology publishing company in the world (IDG literally publishes in every continent), Gallant (Twitter: @JohnGallant1) works with editorial teams to set content strategy and figure out how to leverage social and mobile as he determines the overall content strategy that drives the business of IDG in the U.S. The print industry has been completely re-vamped by digital transformation. With just one print publication left today, CIO Magazine, IDG has reinvented itself and continues to serve their audience using a rich array of media such as web-based tools, social media, podcasts and events.

Content is so important, not just to marketing, but to all businesses looking to drive successful outcomes. More and more companies are realizing the importance of quality content and the role it plays in building that ongoing relationship with their customers, however when you look across the technology landscape, there are a lot of people covering a lot of similar technologies. IDG differentiates their brand by focusing on delivering high-value content targeted for specific audiences that is not being delivered by another brand in the market.

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Getting Maximum Value from Data Marketing

IDG Connect 0811 Getting Maximum Value from Data Marketing

A social media expert with over 15 years’ experience in digital, Christian works with some of the biggest platforms and programmes on TV, taking social media data and making it into relevant, interesting and engaging content. He currently works at performance marketing agency Albion Cell, delivering data-driven social media strategies for clients including King.com, Jose Cuervo and Ubuntu.

Marketers are often unduly daunted by the prospect of big data, possibly because the sky really is the limit when it comes to what can be done and how much can be collected. There is also a problem in that despite it being a ‘hot topic’ for so long, most businesses still aren’t leveraging new data technologies and techniques nearly enough.

Data presents an enormous opportunity to better understand your customers and their purchase behaviour, and then hone your marketing based on these insights.

Even if you are planning to outsource your data efforts to a consultant or agency, it’s a good idea for any marketer to have a basic, practical understanding of the key aspects involved. The more intelligently targeted your marketing is, the more efficient it will be.

1) Choose the right data storage for your business

There are effectively two types of data storage: on-premise or off-premise. While off-premise is more cost effective (and used successfully by online-only businesses like ASOS and Amazon, which have been able to create their systems from scratch entirely in the cloud), there are always issues of access and privacy or security. On-premise is more expensive due to high server costs, but gives businesses full control over the data – banks, for example, use data warehouses to minimise risk. When you’re deciding which system to use, consider your priorities and choose accordingly.

It should be noted that some businesses do a hybrid approach, but the challenge here comes when you want to combine your cloud data with any on-premise data to do deeper, more thorough marketing. Lloyds Bank has successfully built a very sophisticated hybrid system but there currently isn’t a way of combining on and off-premise data very easily or efficiently.

2) Only store what you need

The key point you should think about is what, from the enormous volumes of data you can collect, you actually need to collect and store. If you store only the relevant data you can be far more efficient.

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