Events
Event Date Location

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

Data+: Analyze, Predict, Monetize

09/07/2014 - 09/09/2014 Phoenix AZ

iMedia Brand Summit: Marketing in an Always-On World

09/07/2014 - 09/10/2014 Coronado CA

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

Video Insider Summit

09/14/2014 - 09/17/2014 Montauk NY

Ad Age Digital Conference San Francisco

09/16/2014 San Francisco CA

Ad Age CMO Strategy Summit

09/17/2014 San Francisco CA

CSO Perspectives on Defending Against the Pervasive Attacker

09/17/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

09/17/2014 San Jose CA

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10 Tips For Building A Community On Twitter

MediaBistro

If a tweet is sent and no one is around to read it, does it make an impact? This isn’t a philosophical question: the answer is resoundingly “no.”

If you’re not part of a community on Twitter, you’re likely not seeing any real engagement with your content. Here are ten tips for building a community that will add value to your Twitter experience.

1. Tweet consistently

This applies to both timing and topic. The more regularly you tweet throughout the week, and the more on-topic you are (whichever topic that may be), the more targeted followers you will attract.

2. Be helpful

Give before you ask. Offer to help someone – whether they have asked a question, need a favor or they are simply new to Twitter – and they will remember you. Do this enough times, and you’ll build a loyal following of folks who know where to turn when they need something.

3. Search for them

Use Twitter’s advanced search or a Twitter directory to search for people that you’d like in your community. You can search by topic, keyword and more to discover who’s tweeting about the things you’re interested in. Then, follow a handful of these accounts each day, and you’ll be surprised by how many follow you back!

4. Leverage existing connections

You probably already have an offline community, especially if you’re tweeting on behalf of a business – so use it! Let your in-store customers, the people you email, and everyone you’re connected to professionally know you tweet by adding your Twitter handle to store signage, your email signature and more.

5. Build a strong brand

Communities flourish where they have a distinct mandate. So if you have a strong brand presence, one that matches your offline or other digital presence, you’ll be more likely to attract and keep followers who are eager to engage with your brand.

6. Know the lingo

Understanding the basics of Twitter is a must when building a community. If you’re unsure of what RT or DM means, you can take a look at Twitter’s glossary.

7. Respond to all @replies

No community member likes to be ignored! Don’t forget to respond, in a timely manner, to everyone who interacts with you on Twitter. This will show your community that you are engaged, and not simply using Twitter to broadcast one-way messages.

8. Start a hashtag chat

Hashtag chats are all the rage these days, with brands, celebrities and experts coming together with their communities to discuss a single topic on Twitter. Chats can be one-off, or they can be scheduled regularly. They are a great way to build a community, as they promote engagement, networking and learning. We have resources for you if you’re looking to start a hashtag chat, or if you want to just dip your toes in first and join an pre-existing chat.

9. Promote others

Even if you are the center of your community, you won’t last long if all you do is self-promote. Try promoting others by retweeting them, sharing their content and introducing them to one another.

10. Network with influencers

Influencers can amplify your message, and get it in front of a large, targeted, engaged audience. Try building relationships with a handful of influencers in your industry to tap into an even larger community.

‘LinkedIn falls flat on consumer engagement’

Marketing Week

The report, authored by Forrester senior analyst Kim Celestre, claims that despite its 300 million members LinkedIn has not gained traction as a tool for “social relationship objectives” that drive customer engagement such as loyalty or customer service.

The research found that 21 per cent of US online adults visit LinkedIn monthly, a significantly lower figure than for Facebook. Plus LinkedIn members are much less likely to engage with brands on the social network, with less than half doing so on LinkedIn compared to more than 70 per cent on Facebook.

It also has a lower engagement rate, measuring 0.054 per cent in terms of user interactions as a percentage of a brand’s fans or followers, behind Google+ on 0.069 per cent and Facebook with 0.073 per cent. The low engagement figures mean that just 13 per cent of digital marketers are using LinkedIn to drive engagement.

“When compared with Facebook and Google+, LinkedIn’s engagement rate does not stack up. This is because LinkedIn members don’t go to the social network to follow brands after they’ve purchased a product and don’t participate in the site often enough to deepen relationships with brands,” says Celestre.

Awareness Boost

However, Forrester believes marketers should not give up on LinkedIn, using it for brand awareness. When used in this way, says Celestre, LinkedIn has the potential to help “meet or exceed” social reach objectives, so long as a brand’s offering is relevant to professionals.

Brands can make sure they are relevant by using the site to solve a professional challenge, deliver a professional opportunity or help users develop their personal brands. Celestre cites examples such as Procter & Gamble’s Secret deodorant campaign, Citi’s sponsorship of a LinkedIn group called “Connect: Professional Women’s Network” and Microsoft’s custom API that analyses users profiles to provide job title recommendations as examples of how to market successfully on the social network.

LinkedIn has previously batted away criticism of its engagement rates, citing strong engagement following its move to open its publishing platform to any user in its latest quarterly results. Its marketing solutions revenues are also on the up, increasing by 36 per cent to $101.8m in the three months to the end of May and accounting for 22 per cent of its total revenue.

LinkedIn declined to provide a comment.

Communicating to a B2B audience

Tim Pritchard, head of social media at Manning Gottlieb OMD, questions comparing LinkedIn to Facebook, calling it an “unfair measurement”. This is because Facebook is used for more traditional brand metrics such as consideration and purchase while LinkedIn should be used more for metrics such as brand trust and respect, he adds.

“Communications are going out to a B2B audience which has completely different KPIs like trust, respect and share price rather than traditional brand metrics like consideration,” he adds.

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Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness

eMarketer

Social media provides brands with another channel for content sharing. But as this becomes the norm, content marketers are looking to the next step in the process: measuring the effectiveness of this content. Based on an April 2014 study conducted by Ipsos OTX for the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), the overwhelming majority of brands are now doing so.

174972 Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness

 According to the research, 80% of US client-side marketers measured the effectiveness of their social content, with social media metrics such as “likes” the most common. Usage statistics—daily or monthly active users, for example—fell in the middle of the list. Meanwhile, metrics that could identify business ramifications were not used nearly as much, with financially based measurements such as return on investment and sales landing near the bottom.

While most marketers were measuring social content effectiveness in some way, ANA noted that they were still using soft metrics vs. solid metrics, indicating further room for growth.

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Mobile Infographic: Millennials vs. Generation X

IDG GlobalSolutions Color Mobile Infographic: Millennials vs. Generation X

A global content revolution is upon us. These days practically every piece of con- tent we discover, share or engage with comes as a stream of digital information – real-time search results, social media feeds or swathes of rich media ads and advertorial experiences.

Nearly all respondents aged 18 to 34 owned a smartphone, and 91% of 18- to 24-year-olds and 85% of 25- to 34-year-olds used social networking sites and apps on their smartphone. Only 38% of 18- to 24-year-olds owned a tablet, however. Tablet ownership jumps to 55% among 25- to 34-year-olds, and 65% report using another device or screen, primarily television (83%) at the same time as their tablet.

To reach these audiences, tech marketers are now competing with mainstream brands on Facebook or trying to grab their audience’s attention during television programs. B2B brands investing in quality social content or video with high production values comparable to television are most likely to engage young influencers and stimulate social media shares.

To download the 2014 IDG Global Mobile Survey white paper and view other infographics, click here

millenials vs genx final Mobile Infographic: Millennials vs. Generation X

Mobile app usage hits 51% of all time spent on digital media

CNET

Here’s a stat that will make most people nod in agreement: time spent on mobile apps is at an all-time high and just keeps growing. But, breaking down the data piece-by-piece does carry some surprising facts — such as people use Internet radio, social media, and photos far more on their mobile devices than on their PCs.

What’s more, for the first time ever, time spent on mobile apps is higher than any other digital medium, coming in at 51 percent.

This new data comes from ComScore’s latest mobile app report. The analytics company looked at roughly 10 billion minutes of user engagement on apps during the month of May.

Just a year ago, mobile platforms commanded 50 percent of users’ total digital media time, and now that number is up to 60 percent — the majority of that within apps.

According to ComScore, of all the app categories, digital radio is where people spend the most amount of time, with 96 percent of user engagement coming from mobile devices and Pandora leading that category. Coming in a very close second, also with 96 percent, was photos, which was led by apps like Instagram and Flickr. Other categories, like maps and instant messaging, were also overwhelmingly used on smartphones and tablets.

“While the mobile platform shift continues unabated, not every content category has experienced the shift at the same speed,” ComScore wrote in its report. “Amazingly, but perhaps not altogether unexpectedly, a couple of important categories have shifted almost exclusively to mobile.”

ComScore also points to the importance of growth in the social networking category, with apps like Facebook and Twitter. While only 70 percent of user activity comes from mobile, the category has seen huge increases in the last year — total mobile engagement in this category has grown 55 percent and has accounted for 31 percent of all Internet growth since 2013.

“While social networking does not rank at the very top of this list among the most mobile-skewing content categories, it is arguably the most important,” ComScore wrote.

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Study: Brand Likes Up 30% On Facebook

MediaPost

Since January, page interactions among Facebook users — including “likes,” shares, and comments — have risen 30%.

That’s according to new data from Prague-based social analytics firm Socialbakers, which it gathered from a sampling of some 3 million pages on Facebook.

The findings contradict a number of recent reports, which suggested that brands and media companies are seeing their organic reach rates decline on the social network.

A number of misconceptions have contributed to the perception that brands are getting a raw deal on Facebook, according to Jan Rezab, co-founder and CEO of Socialbakers.

“It’s important to remember that the Facebook news feed is smart enough to know whether [particular users] have a preference for brands or not,” Rezab said on Thursday. “Two individuals will not share identical brand experiences, explaining the expected confusion around engagement levels.”

This week is shaping up to be one of redemption for Facebook. Already, Forrester has rebutted reports of fewer teens using the social giant. The research firm surveyed 4,517 teenagers ages 12-17, and found that 78% are using Facebook, 46% are using the service more than they were last year, and 28% are on it “all the time.”

“Facebook remains by far young users’ favorite social network,” Forrester found. Forrester also predicted that Facebook usage rates will continue to rise, due to increased mobile penetration and increased activity from younger generations.

Also boding well for Facebook, social-analytics start-up Shareablee recently found that among 150 brands, total organic reach grew 11% from the fourth quarter 2013 to the first quarter 2014.

The problem was that other reports focused too heavily on post-level reach — which did decline 27% over the quarter — Tania Yuki, founder and CEO of Shareablee, told Social Media & Marketing Daily in May. What those reports failed to consider was the resulting increase in engagement rates, which increased 65% over the quarter.

Stateside, social media ad revenues will grow from $5.1 billion in 2013 to $15 billion in 2018 — representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24% — according to a recent forecast from BIA/Kelsey.

Box buys Streem to make the cloud part of your desktop

CITEworld

Cloud store-and-sync service Box has snapped up Y Combinator-backedstartup Streem for an undisclosed sum. Streem, as you may guess from the name, provides a streaming service that lets users access content from the cloud without taking up any space on the local hard drive — especially handy when dealing with large video files.

“Streem has developed amazing technology that allows you to mount a cloud drive onto your computer — making documents, presentations, videos and files available to you without the limitations of your local hard-disk, effectively turning the cloud into an ‘unlimited’ drive,” writes Box CEO and Co-Founder in an official blog entry.

As it stands today, Box’s core sync functionality lets you keep files and folders in sync across mobile and desktop platforms. But that still requires a copy to be kept locally if you want to make any changes. There are administrative controls available to restrict what users can do with those local copies, and in some scenarios (like previewing on mobile files), no local copy is actually cached.

Facebook’s New Focus Changes the Game for Brand Advertisers

eMarketer

Facebook’s recent focus on direct-response advertising is leaving fewer options for marketers with branding goals, according to a new eMarketer report, “Facebook Advertising: Next Steps for Brand Advertisers.”

174294 Facebooks New Focus Changes the Game for Brand Advertisers

Not so long ago, the common belief was that Facebook—and social media in general—would be best suited for building awareness and engagement, not for influencing conversion or sales. However, the majority of Facebook’s most recent ad initiatives are aimed at marketers with performance goals, while the company has de-emphasized ads aimed at driving social interaction and engagement, a concept that brought many brand advertisers onto the platform.

“Companies still see Facebook as a platform for social brand interactions, but that’s no longer the way Facebook is presenting itself,” said Debra Aho Williamson, principal analyst of social media at eMarketer. “Facebook has moved on, but many brands are still marketing there the same way they did two years ago.”

Facebook accounts for a growing share of digital ad spending, and eMarketer expects the company’s worldwide advertising revenues to increase 56.4% in 2014 to reach $10.93 billion. That figure represents a 7.8% market share of global digital ad spending, increasing from a 5.8% share in 2013 and 4.1% in 2012. eMarketer estimates that digital ad spending worldwide will reach $140.15 billion this year, growing 16.74% over 2013.

Facebook does not publicly break down its ad revenues along branding/direct-response lines. But based on how the company’s business has evolved, and comments company executives have made, it is likely that direct response represents a majority of ad revenues.

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7 Global Social Media Day Events You Should Attend

Mashable

This year marks the fifth-annual celebration of Social Media Day. In just a short time, it has grown to become a truly global effort, with hundreds of events taking place all over the world.

On June 30, people will come together, either at in-person events, or by using the #SMDayhashtag to connect with others on social media.

If you live in the United States, there are multiple Social Media Day events that you should consider attending. But if you’re located outside of the U.S., there are still plenty of opportunities to celebrate Social Media Day with others.

Here is a list of international events you should attend if you’re in the area:

Melbourne, Australia

When: June 29, 2014 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. AEST
Where: Inspire9, Level 1, 41 Stewart St, Melbourne, AU 3121

Melbourne’s third-annual Social Media Day Unconference (#smdmelb) encourages digital enthusiasts to come together to network, and share stories about their personal experiences with social media.

Throughout the day, several simultaneous 30-minute sessions will take place. The majority of session topics are proposed on the spot by attendees who will jot down their ideas or questions on a piece of paper. A session can be in any format — whether it be a presentation with Q&A, panel of experts, demo or roundtable. As per unconference guidelines, all attendees are expected to be active participants in the sessions.

Panama City, Panama

When: June 30, 2014 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET
Where: City of Knowledge, Panama City, 7336, Panama

Panama City’s fifth-annual Social Media Day celebration is sure to be another hit, as past celebrations have had up to 1,200 guests.

This year’s celebration will include speakers from Waze and Google, social-media workshops, as well as meet-and-greets to mix online connections with IRL networking. The ambitious 12-hour celebration will include breaks for attendees to view the World Cup quarterfinal matches on that day. Attendees will be encouraged to use the hashtag #SMDayPA, as they make new connections.

Gold Coast, Queensland

When: June 30, 2014 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. AEST
Where: 194 Varsity Drive, Varsity Lakes, Gold Coast

The theme for this year’s Social Media Day Gold Coast (#smdaygc) event is “putting the social back into social media.” The event will include a 45-minute panel discussion with speakers such as Andrew Richardson, the former creative director at News Ltd., Evie Mitchell of Daytona Powersports and Melissa Groom, the founder of Empowered Mums. The event will conclude with an interactive social-media scavenger hunt throughout the building.

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You’d have to be crazy to start a media company, right?

Digiday

The publishing climate today is, in a word, messy. Display advertising, the industry’s lifeblood, is on the ropes. Readers don’t seem to care where their news comes from, and publishers are competing with the likes of Facebook, Netflix and YouTube for surfers’ attention.

So why start a media company today? You’d have to be crazy, right?

Not so fast. Despite industry uncertainties, founders of sites like The Daily Dot, Skift and The Information have made the brazen, almost crazy, move to jump head-first into the world of publishing. And they seem to be pretty optimistic about it, against all odds.

Here, then, is a look at what’s driving the latest crop of publishing entrepreneurs, for better or worse.

Skift
In two years, travel site Skift has gone from being the travel industry news rookie to its daily must-read. That’s rarely easy to pull off, but Rafat Ali, the company’s CEO, said that Skift did it by finding an underserved vertical and developing a strong brand and product offering around it. And the Web makes all of that easier, not harder, to do.

“The building of a brand matters a lot in media,” Ali said. “You want to be in the position where people grow to be fans, not just readers. It’s hard to achieve that in any other sector.”

Having a strong vertical focus also opens the door to a range of new business lines. For Skift, this means being able to sell research reports, events and data to its target audience.

The Information
The Information, which launched in December, is rare among technology sites in that it asks readers to pay for its content. And while that seems like a nutty proposition in the age of infinitely free information, Jessica Lessin, the company’s CEO, argues the opposite: Readers are willing and able to pay for content — assuming you know who those readers are and how to best serve them.

“The economics of what we’re trying to do are favorable because we have a lower cost equation and a much greater demand for our product,” she said. “What we found was an area with greater-than-ever demand and lower-than-ever costs.”

The Daily Dot
Few in the digital publishing world  would argue that the industry has everything figured out. But Nicholas White, CEO of The Daily Dot, said that the messiness is actually a good thing — particularly for smaller, more nimble media companies.

White shares the view of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who often argues that the companies that thrive are the ones that are able to do things well, even though they’re difficult. “Starting a media company may be one of the hardest things to do in business right now,” he said. “But it is worth doing.”

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