Events
Event Date Location

 CSO Perspectives on Data Protection and Privacy

09/23/2014 San francisco CA

OMMA Premium Display @ Advertising Week

09/30/2014 New York NY

OMMA RTB (Real-Time Buying) @ Advertising Week

10/02/2014 New York NY

The Hub Brand Experience Symposium

10/07/2014 - 10/08/2014 New York NY

OMMA RTB (Real-Time Buying)

10/14/2014 London

OMMA Chicago

10/21/2014 - 10/22/2014 Chicago IL

iMedia Breakthrough Summit: The Next Wave of Marketing

10/26/2014 - 10/28/2014 Stone Mountain Georgia

Ad Age Data Conference

10/28/2014 - 10/29/2014 New York NY

CIO Perspectives Houston

11/11/2014 San Jose CA

DEMO Fall 2014 

11/18/2014 - 11/20/2014 San Jose CA

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketer's Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Technology Business and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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The Best Tactics to Generate More Leads from Facebook and Twitter

SocialMedia Today

Social Media is a great way to connect, share and interact with others beyond the known periphery. Savvy business people are interested to explore this opportunity and reach maximum number of potential customers via social media. You will come across many online blogs discussing the best ways to enhance your social media reach. We will not delve into that same matter further. Our focus will be on something else…… Lead Generation.

Likes, pins, followers, comments, friends, and engagement- these are popular social media metrics. But, what is more vital to consider whether such metrics result on sales at the end of the day? Otherwise, all of them are completely useless.

Change your perspective

One of the biggest misconceptions about social media sites is that they are just only for brand awareness and not for generating leads. If you consider the same, your business is missing out a lucrative marketing channel.

Instead, of getting distracted with the counts of Facebook “likes “and Twitter “followers”, focus on the statistics that can contribute to your revenue. It will be impossible to track ROI, if your organization’s social media strategy is not constructed to support lead generation. It is high time to change your outlook and concentrate on generating social media leads.

If you are planning to start a lead generation campaign, Facebook and Twitter profiles are great places to begin with. Here are a few tips that you should consider to generate leads from these two well-known social media profiles:

Facebook

There are 1.2 billion active monthly users on Facebook and therefore, this channel is the prime focus of the business owners. However, this platform is often not conducive for direct sales, but by distributing quality content and engaging with the customers in one-to-one communication it possible to build trust among the Facebook users. What else you can do to generate leads from this popular channel? Let’s see-

Attracting the customers

First, it is important to understand the kind of information your potential customers are looking for. Sweepstakes, contests and group offers on your Facebook page are good to attract the attention of the customers. Do you remember “Do Us a Flavor” campaign from Lay’s? The brand just asked for a new flavor that the customers may like in their chips. The idea was simple and it clicked. This campaign generated huge publicity and the brand has no doubt gained lots of new customers.

Try to know your customers

You should also think about the information that you might like to know from your customers. It will be easier for you to convert your visitors into lead once you are equipped with more information about them. For that, you may use Facebook tab to ask them few simple questions. However, a social media user does not like these tabs and rarely visit them. You have to think of ways to encourage a visitor to fill up the questionnaire. A giveaway or offer can be enticing and works well to gather customer insights. You can also reveal the content of your website, if the user is ready to fill the signup form. Always try to keep such forms concise with minimum questions. You may ask for email address, demographic data or geographic location information. But, before that, customize your tab and make it brand related.

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What’s REALLY the Best Time to Post on Social Media?

SocialMedia Today

There are a heap of posts and infographics floating about the web which detail the best days and times to post to the various social media platforms. Some even have studies and data linked to them, showing the optimum times to get the most engagement and reach when posting on your chosen platform. While these generic guides are helpful – following this advice is better than just posting at random – the one thing I always think is, “Yeah, but…”

You see, generic data can be useful and can provide you with a level of guidance, but the generic audience they’re targeting with those times is not your audience. For example, the data might show the best time of day to post to Twitter is 11am on a Thursday, because that’s when the majority of users are active – but the specific audience that you want to reach might not necessarily be in that majority. And because of that, it’s also possible that the optimum time to reach them might not be 11am on Thursday. Maybe it’s a different time, a different day entirely – optimum times can vary significantly from industry to industry and business to business. With this in mind, here are a couple of methods you can use to ascertain the optimum times to reach the audience you really want to reach – your audience (and the audience of your competitors).

How to Locate Your Optimum Time to Post on Facebook

Anyone with a Facebook business page will also have access to Facebook Page Insights. While Insights tracks a tonne of data about your page interactions, this data is sometimes not as clear as you’d like when trying to work out optimum times to post. Enter Fanpage Karma. Fanpage Karma provides detailed analytics on your Facebook page, including helpful charts that show which days, times and post types are best for your audience.

Using this, you can work out what times you should post, and what type of content you should post, to maximise reach, response and engagement, based on your specific business data.

But what if that’s not enough? That data might be great, but that doesn’t necessarily show you the best times to post, just the best times to post based on your own previous behaviour. What if you’re just starting out and you haven’t posted enough for that data to be indicative? What if you’ve only posted at certain times of day, say, morning and night, but maybe, if you posted at midday, that might be better? That won’t show up in the data, right? The best way to get around this is to also analyse your competitors.

To do this, you can either look up your competition, based on what you already know, or you can research who your competitors are by looking them up in Google (make sure you search in incognito mode so the search results are not specific to you). Search for the top five keywords or phrases you want/expect people to associate with your brand – you can also enter a location, if your main competitors are local. For each search, note down the top results, then look them up on Facebook and run their pages through Fanpage Karma too.

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With Revenue Roaring, Twitter’s Advertising Team Is Untouched by Turmoil

The New York Times

Twitter‘s top executive ranks have been transformed in the last year, from its general counsel to, most recently, its chief financial officer.

Many of the executives have left or been pushed out as Twitter’s chief executive, Dick Costolo, has brought in a new team to try to increase sluggish user growth at the social network.

But in one very important area of the company — Twitter’s ad business — the leadership has remained relatively untouched.

Adam Bain, Twitter’s global president of revenue and partnerships, has been Twitter’s lead money man since he took the job nearly four years ago. A former executive at Fox Sports Media Group, Mr. Bain came to Twitter to oversee the development of the company’s then nascent advertising products.

In the reorganization after the resignation of Twitter’s No. 2 executive, Ali Rowghani, last month, Mr. Bain also took over control of business development. His role atop the moneymaking machine suggests that he might very well be the second most important person at the company after Mr. Costolo.

Before Twitter began selling sponsored tweets and other ad products in 2010, the company had very little revenue, most deriving from licensing deals with companies like Google andMicrosoft.

Now Twitter frequently runs sponsored video clips, one of the top social media ad products connected to live televised events, and it is rapidly building out its mobile presence, including challenging Facebook’s dominance in mobile app installation ads. This year,Twitter has said, it expects to post $1.2 billion to $1.25 billion in revenue, nearly double the $665 million it took in last year, although the company expects to continue to report net losses.

Along with enlarging the business and courting big advertisers and TV networks, Mr. Bain has poached numerous advertising veterans from technology companies across Silicon Valley to add to his team at Twitter.

Google has been a favorite target. Richard Alfonsi left Google in 2012 to lead the efforts to target small- and medium-size businesses, while Shailesh Rao and Stephen McIntyre left Google earlier that year to head Twitter’s Asian and European advertising sales efforts.

Mr. Bain’s top colleague, Kevin Weil, has also risen to prominence. Beginning his career at Twitter as an engineer managing much of the company’s analytics, Mr. Weil quickly moved to the ad side and was promoted three times. He is now vice president for revenue products at the company and is also becoming deeply involved in some nonadvertisement products, such as the hosting and automatic previewing of video clips on the site.

Under Mr. Bain, Twitter has also acquired MoPub andTapCommerce, two start-ups that were in the business of serving advertisements to users of other mobile apps. Even if Twitter’s user growth continues to wane, the thinking goes, the company can still lift its bottom line by selling mobile ads that run in places other than its flagship service.

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Study: Twitter actually is helping your TV campaign

Digiday

Twitter’s pitch that its ads amplify brands’ messages beyond TV is now supported by agency-backed research.

The company, in conjunction with Starcom Mediavest Group, released on Tuesday the results of a six-month study into the effectiveness of pairing TV and Twitter ads, the upshot of which is that Twitter users are more receptive to advertising than the typical TV viewer and that pairing Twitter and TV makes for some powerful brand advertising.

Twitter-supported TV campaigns deliver a 50 percent greater ROI than TV-only campaigns, SMG’s Kate Sirkin said. Brand awareness was 6.9 percent higher among audiences to such campaigns while households exhibited a 4 percent increase in sales versus TV alone. Favorability rose 6 percent for users who interacted with a promoted tweet, meanwhile.

Curiously, Twitter president of global revenue Adam Bain was not using the study as evidence for why brands need to transition their ad dollars from TV to digital. Rather, the study should entice some brands to migrate “underperforming” digital dollars to TV (and Twitter).

“When you run both TV and Twitter together, we actually think budgets can go from the digital side to TV,” Bain told Digiday on Tuesday in Cannes. “Spending on Twitter makes your digital outcomes go farther, but your TV outcomes go farther as well.”

Bain positioning Twitter as the “bridge” between digital and TV makes it an alluring ad platform for brands looking to test whether their TV budgets might be better spent than solely on TV spots.

But that message is also integral for Twitter’s ad business, and thus the health of its business in general going forward. Twitter’s response to Wall Street worries about its decelerating user growth has been to emphasize that Twitter’s influence extends far beyond Twitter itself. That may well be true for celebrities taking selfies, but a promoted tweet is not as likely to generate the same kind of press coverage. And perhaps more damning was when an NBC exec said this April that Twitter had no effect on boosting ratings.

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Screen Shot 2014 07 08 at 1.32.26 PM Study: Twitter actually is helping your TV campaign

Why Facebook’s user experiment is bad news for businesses

CITEworld

The big data problem isn’t just about handling petabytes of information, or asking the right question, or avoiding false correlations (like understanding that just because more people drown at the same time as more ice cream is eaten, banning ice cream won’t reduce drownings).

It’s also about handling data responsibly. And so far, we’re not doing as well with that as we could be.

First Target worked out how to tell if you’re pregnant before your family does and decided to disguise its creepy marketing by mixing in irrelevant coupons with the baby offers. Then Facebook did research to find out if good news makes you depressed by showing some people more bad news and discovered that no, we’re generous enough to respond to positive posts with more positivity.

But if companies keep using the information about us in creepy ways instead of responsible ones, maybe we’ll stop being generous enough to share it. And that could mean we lose out on more efficient transport, cleaner cities and cheaper power, detecting dangerous drug interactions and the onset of depression — and hundreds of other advances we can get by applying machine learning to big data.

It’s time for a big data code of conduct.

Facebook’s dubious research is problematic for lots of reasons. For one thing, Facebook’s policy on what it would do with your data didn’t mention research until four months after it conducted the experiment. Facebook’s response was essentially to say that “everyone does it” and “we don’t have to call it research if it’s about making the service better” and other weasel-worded corporate comments. And the researcher’s apology was more about having caused anxiety by explaining the research badly than about having manipulated what appeared in timelines, because Facebook is manipulating what you see in your timeline all the time. Of course, that’s usually to make things better, not to see what your Pavlovian reaction to positive or negative updates is. The fact that Facebook can’t see that one is optimizing information and the other is treating users as lab rats — and that the difference is important — says that Facebook needs a far better ethics policy on how it mines user data for research.

Plus, Facebook has enough data that it shouldn’t have needed to manipulate the timelines in the first place; if its sentiment analysis was good enough to tell the difference between positive and negative posts (which is doubtful given how basic it was and how poor sentiment analysis tools are at detecting sarcasm), it should have been able to find users who were already seeing more positive or more negative updates than most users and simply track how positive or negative their posts were afterwards. When you have a hypothesis, you experiment on your data, not your users.

That’s how Eric Horvitz at Microsoft Research has run experiments to detect whether you’re likely to get depression, whether two drugs are interacting badly, whether a cholera epidemic is about to happen, and whether people are getting used to cartel violence in Mexico.

Using public Twitter feeds and looking at language, how often people tweet and at what time of day and how that changes, Horvitz’s team was able to predict with 70% accuracy who was going to suffer depression (which might help people get treatment and reduce the suicide rate from depression). Not only did they use information people were already sharing, they asked permission to look at them.

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Why social media is not the most effective channel for business

iMedia Connection

Let me preface this article by saying that social media can work as an acquisition channel. In fact, it is used by many businesses every day. And for some businesses, it is a better channel than average. But on the whole, other channels are more effective at acquisition, and time and money can be spent better elsewhere — especially for those on a limited budget.

The crux of the matter is that people are in passive content mode when using social media, mixed with a little communication mode. When looking to market to people who are currently looking for your product, companies need people who are in task oriented mode. So while we can spend money finding and tempting people that are in a different mode, it is more effective to do so when they’re in the right frame of mind.

bart1 Why social media is not the most effective channel for business

The above chart is just for illustration to help visualize the difference in “mode” that people are in when on social media channels. When it comes to aligning your marketing channels with a specific goal in mind, typically social media is where the passive content mode is most used. People are actively communicating in forums and via email, and of course also via social media. And when it comes to users achieving task oriented objectives, you might find most people are using search, comparison, and shopping sites.

There is of course a fair bit of overlap. But in broad strokes, if you have a direct marketing strategy, you want to be where the task oriented people are. If you want to affect brand attitudes, you want to meet with people in active communication mode. And when you want the general audience to know of you and affect brand awareness, passive content mode is where it’s at.

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Brandnew’s Back-Door Approach To Native Advertising

AdExchanger

Everyone wants to get into native advertising, yet everyone has a different definition as to what exactly that entails. Social media sites have it easy because any sponsored post, automatically blending into the site design, can hitch a ride on the native bandwagon.

But while Facebook and Twitter are the current hotbeds of social advertising, Instagram and Pinterest are coming up fast. But unlike Facebook and Twitter, advertising around the two image-based interfaces revolves heavily around influencers, instead of traditional paid placements.

Berlin-based Brandnew IO, which began in early 2013, provides a platform and service designed to help brands reach influencers on Instagram and Pinterest.

“At that time we saw that more and more brands and agencies wanted to reach new consumers,” said Brandnew CEO Francis Trapp. “They wanted to target groups on platforms like Instagram and at the time there was no central way of doing it.”

At first, Brandnew identified influencers manually but it soon developed a platform designed to automate the process and handles campaign tracking. That being said, Brandnew’s staff still needs to vet the influencers for quality.

“We check to ensure these influential people are worth taking onboard,” Trapp said. “We determine if they have big enough accounts and real followers as opposed to fake followers. We ensure that the quality of their content is suitable for our brands.”

Trapp spoke with AdExchanger.

AdExchanger: Brandnew pushes brand-produced images out for influencers to share. Is that actually native advertising?

FRANCIS TRAPP: We see ourselves as a company that connects brands with influential people. Obviously we also need to consult brands on what works for them on these social channels. Sometimes our clients have a very clear idea of what the campaign should look like, but sometimes they have no idea.

One thing we have to ensure is that the campaigns we run are interesting for all parties involved. On one hand this means that the client should run a campaign with an image that really represents their brand. On the other hand, the influencer should make sure that image is distributed to the right accounts. Our influencers always tell us that they want to run campaigns that don’t annoy their followers. That’s the main hurdle to native advertising.

Sometimes we see that certain clients of ours view Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest as social media and nothing more. We are convinced that each platform has a unique DNA, and the way people use each one differs. Typical demographics of Pinterest users differ from Instagram users. This has to be reflected in the campaigns we launch for the brands we represent.

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10 Tips For Building A Community On Twitter

MediaBistro

If a tweet is sent and no one is around to read it, does it make an impact? This isn’t a philosophical question: the answer is resoundingly “no.”

If you’re not part of a community on Twitter, you’re likely not seeing any real engagement with your content. Here are ten tips for building a community that will add value to your Twitter experience.

1. Tweet consistently

This applies to both timing and topic. The more regularly you tweet throughout the week, and the more on-topic you are (whichever topic that may be), the more targeted followers you will attract.

2. Be helpful

Give before you ask. Offer to help someone – whether they have asked a question, need a favor or they are simply new to Twitter – and they will remember you. Do this enough times, and you’ll build a loyal following of folks who know where to turn when they need something.

3. Search for them

Use Twitter’s advanced search or a Twitter directory to search for people that you’d like in your community. You can search by topic, keyword and more to discover who’s tweeting about the things you’re interested in. Then, follow a handful of these accounts each day, and you’ll be surprised by how many follow you back!

4. Leverage existing connections

You probably already have an offline community, especially if you’re tweeting on behalf of a business – so use it! Let your in-store customers, the people you email, and everyone you’re connected to professionally know you tweet by adding your Twitter handle to store signage, your email signature and more.

5. Build a strong brand

Communities flourish where they have a distinct mandate. So if you have a strong brand presence, one that matches your offline or other digital presence, you’ll be more likely to attract and keep followers who are eager to engage with your brand.

6. Know the lingo

Understanding the basics of Twitter is a must when building a community. If you’re unsure of what RT or DM means, you can take a look at Twitter’s glossary.

7. Respond to all @replies

No community member likes to be ignored! Don’t forget to respond, in a timely manner, to everyone who interacts with you on Twitter. This will show your community that you are engaged, and not simply using Twitter to broadcast one-way messages.

8. Start a hashtag chat

Hashtag chats are all the rage these days, with brands, celebrities and experts coming together with their communities to discuss a single topic on Twitter. Chats can be one-off, or they can be scheduled regularly. They are a great way to build a community, as they promote engagement, networking and learning. We have resources for you if you’re looking to start a hashtag chat, or if you want to just dip your toes in first and join an pre-existing chat.

9. Promote others

Even if you are the center of your community, you won’t last long if all you do is self-promote. Try promoting others by retweeting them, sharing their content and introducing them to one another.

10. Network with influencers

Influencers can amplify your message, and get it in front of a large, targeted, engaged audience. Try building relationships with a handful of influencers in your industry to tap into an even larger community.

‘LinkedIn falls flat on consumer engagement’

Marketing Week

The report, authored by Forrester senior analyst Kim Celestre, claims that despite its 300 million members LinkedIn has not gained traction as a tool for “social relationship objectives” that drive customer engagement such as loyalty or customer service.

The research found that 21 per cent of US online adults visit LinkedIn monthly, a significantly lower figure than for Facebook. Plus LinkedIn members are much less likely to engage with brands on the social network, with less than half doing so on LinkedIn compared to more than 70 per cent on Facebook.

It also has a lower engagement rate, measuring 0.054 per cent in terms of user interactions as a percentage of a brand’s fans or followers, behind Google+ on 0.069 per cent and Facebook with 0.073 per cent. The low engagement figures mean that just 13 per cent of digital marketers are using LinkedIn to drive engagement.

“When compared with Facebook and Google+, LinkedIn’s engagement rate does not stack up. This is because LinkedIn members don’t go to the social network to follow brands after they’ve purchased a product and don’t participate in the site often enough to deepen relationships with brands,” says Celestre.

Awareness Boost

However, Forrester believes marketers should not give up on LinkedIn, using it for brand awareness. When used in this way, says Celestre, LinkedIn has the potential to help “meet or exceed” social reach objectives, so long as a brand’s offering is relevant to professionals.

Brands can make sure they are relevant by using the site to solve a professional challenge, deliver a professional opportunity or help users develop their personal brands. Celestre cites examples such as Procter & Gamble’s Secret deodorant campaign, Citi’s sponsorship of a LinkedIn group called “Connect: Professional Women’s Network” and Microsoft’s custom API that analyses users profiles to provide job title recommendations as examples of how to market successfully on the social network.

LinkedIn has previously batted away criticism of its engagement rates, citing strong engagement following its move to open its publishing platform to any user in its latest quarterly results. Its marketing solutions revenues are also on the up, increasing by 36 per cent to $101.8m in the three months to the end of May and accounting for 22 per cent of its total revenue.

LinkedIn declined to provide a comment.

Communicating to a B2B audience

Tim Pritchard, head of social media at Manning Gottlieb OMD, questions comparing LinkedIn to Facebook, calling it an “unfair measurement”. This is because Facebook is used for more traditional brand metrics such as consideration and purchase while LinkedIn should be used more for metrics such as brand trust and respect, he adds.

“Communications are going out to a B2B audience which has completely different KPIs like trust, respect and share price rather than traditional brand metrics like consideration,” he adds.

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Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness

eMarketer

Social media provides brands with another channel for content sharing. But as this becomes the norm, content marketers are looking to the next step in the process: measuring the effectiveness of this content. Based on an April 2014 study conducted by Ipsos OTX for the Association of National Advertisers (ANA), the overwhelming majority of brands are now doing so.

174972 Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness

 According to the research, 80% of US client-side marketers measured the effectiveness of their social content, with social media metrics such as “likes” the most common. Usage statistics—daily or monthly active users, for example—fell in the middle of the list. Meanwhile, metrics that could identify business ramifications were not used nearly as much, with financially based measurements such as return on investment and sales landing near the bottom.

While most marketers were measuring social content effectiveness in some way, ANA noted that they were still using soft metrics vs. solid metrics, indicating further room for growth.

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