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10/26/2014 - 10/28/2014 Stone Mountain Georgia

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IDG’s Social Media Marketing Success Story

Media Shepard

IDG worked with Samsung late last year to promote the company’s 10.1 Galaxy Note tablet. For Samsung, the goals were clear: promote the product during the holiday season in order to reach the campaign’s target business audience. IDG’s job was to leverage its industry contacts and brand following to create awareness and engagement.

That job fell to Colin Browning, marketing services director at IDG, who heads the Performance Marketing group within IDG Strategic Marketing Services. Browning’s team is responsible for the implementation, management, analysis, and optimization of social media and lead generation programs for clients.

mediaShepherd asked Browning to explain how IDG designed and implemented an effective B2B social media campaign: platforms used, specific approaches, goals, strategies and results.

mediaShepherd: What were the goals of the campaign? How were you defining “success” both for your client and IDG?

Colin Browning: The overall campaign goal was to increase the IT leadership’s awareness of Samsung’s new 10.1 inch tablet as a superior device for use in the workplace. For the social component we wanted to get the target audience discussing the broader advantages and flexibility of tablets while including Samsung’s messaging.

mS: There is often a fine line between promotional and valuable content, especially with custom marketing campaigns. How did you ensure that you would be pushing out valuable content to your audiences to facilitate real engagement? (Did the survey(s) you conducted play a role in this?)

CB: The program content, including the Twitter chat topics, were designed to be thought leadership based. While these are all informative pieces and conversations, they were also aligned to the key value propositions of the Samsung Tablet. This enabled us to have broader audience conversations about the use of the tablet in the workplace and what IT’s needs are, without coming across as overly promotional.

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Should publishers take Web design cues from print?

Digiday

With the relaunch of Bloomberg Politics this week, Bloomberg is extending Businessweek’s polarizing design aesthetic further into the Web. With splashy homepage visuals, Businessweek-esque pull quotes and a continuous scrolling feature that mimics page turning, the new site feels less like a purely digital site and more like a digital version of the Businessweek print magazine itself.

And Bloomberg is not alone. Publishers across the Web are taking more digital-design cues from their print brethren. Yahoo, for example, calls its tech, food and travel sites “magazines,” and Flipboard also leans heavily on print cues by mimicking page-flipping and by letting readers curate their own custom magazines — covers and all. It’s an approach that Apple also took with its own Newsstand and iBooks apps, which also try to replicate the experience of reading off paper.

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IDG Corporate Video 2014

idg logo1 IDG Corporate Video 2014

IDG is the world’s leading media, events, and research company reaching over 280 million technology buyings in 97 countries.

IDG Communications (a subsidiary of IDG) is the largest global technology media, data and services company. It delivers personalized and contextual-based experiences for the most powerful tech buyers.

From millennial tech enthusiasts to senior executives, IDG understands and reaches them all.

China’s social media adspend to triple

Warc

HONG KONG: Advertising expenditure on social media in China is forecast to triple over the next five years, overtaking Japan to become the region’s largest market, new figures have shown.

Data from analyst Forrester Research indicate that spending by advertisers in this channel will grow from $535m in 2014 to $1.7bn in 2019. In comparison, spending in Japan will double over the same period, from $864m to $1.6bn.

“Chinese consumers are addicted to social media,” Wang Xiaofeng, Forrester Research analyst, told the South China Morning Post, as she estimated that upwards of 95% of metropolitan internet users were on social networks.

Accordingly, marketers are following them onto the various domestic platforms that have sprung up, although sites such as Sina Weibo, QQ and Renren have been in danger of falling out of fashion as messaging apps like WeChat gain in popularity.

They have reacted with new initiatives and new focus. Thus, for example, Renren made a strategic shift earlier this year to focus on college students and the younger generation, while Weibo looked to integrate itself with TV shows and live events.

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Programmatic Ad Buying to Reach $21 Billion

The Wall Street Journal

Machines are taking on a much bigger role in advertising buying round the world, according to a new study.

Automated ad buying, in which marketers use computerized systems to target users based on consumer data and Web-browsing histories, is expected to jump 52% this year to $21 billion globally, according to a study scheduled to be released Monday by Magna Global, the research and ad-buying arm of Interpublic Group.

Such “programmatic buying” would represent about 42% of global display-related ad business, the company said.

Automated buying is a major departure from the traditional ad-buying process, which involves calling or emailing salespeople to do deals.

About $9.3 billion of the expected automated ad spending this year, Magna said, will be through real-time bidding, in which advertisers use machines to automatically bid for inventory that meets their ad specifications, within milliseconds of it becoming available.

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With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data

The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook built itself into the No. 2 digital advertising platform in the world by analyzing the vast amount of data it had on each of its 1.3 billion users to sell individually targeted ads on its social network.

Now it is going to take those targeted ads to the rest of the Internet, mounting its most direct challenge yet to Google, the leader in digital advertising with nearly one-third of the global market.

On Monday, Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps.

“We are bringing all of the people-based marketing functions that marketers are used to doing on Facebook and allowing them to do that across the web,” David Jakubowski, the company’s head of advertising technology, said in an interview.

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Can This Advertising Innovation at “The New York Times” Save Sinking Ad Revenue?

Remember when newspaper print ads were practically a cultural institution? Stroll to the end of the driveway on a Sunday morning for that several-pounder edition and pore through the articles and the ads. Scan the sales at Macy’s, look for a new job, find a matinee time, decide which store has the best price on rib eyes — the Sunday tome was practically the gateway to the world. Then the Internet relentlessly and almost instantaneously stole print advertising’s relevance, leaving publishers searching for new ways to connect with readers and, just as important, generate revenue.

The New York Times Co. (NYSE: NYT  ) may have finally found that cup-of-coffee-worthy formula for advertising, infusing its smart editorial style into content that resonates with an advertiser’s audience in a way that preserves its integrity as a news source.

It’s been a long road back
It’s safe to say that the heyday of traditional newspaper advertising is over, but looking back at what once worked it seems there are a few ingredients for success: The advertising must be compelling and relevant enough to get consumers to spend time with it. But it must also fit its platform — that is, not compromise the spirit, tone and even journalistic mandate of its publication.

The Times recognized the need for innovation early, building one of the smartest and most clickable Internet portals for its flagship newspaper. Like many of its contemporaries, the company has replaced some lost ad revenue with digital advertising, but not nearly enough. It seemed something was missing. Across the Web, digital ad sales climbed dramatically in recent years, but stayed fairly flat at newspapers. Though moderately successful, banner and display ads and pieces from the ad exchanges never found a comfortable seat in the traditional news format. Ad perusers had plenty of other choices, after all, and consumers had left behind the notion of the newspaper as a place to shop.

 

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Why publishers are learning how to buy ads

Digiday

Publishers are used to spending an inordinate amount of energy trying to attract media buyers, but now they’re also playing the role themselves.

Publishers like Vox Media, BuzzFeed and Complex all have in-house ad-buying capability, part of a shift by publishers in how they think of audience development. Gone is the “build it and they will come” ethos, Instead, publishers are resorting to the brass tacks of building audiences through a variety of methods, including paying for distribution of content.

“Increasingly, it’s something clients are asking for,” Hayley Romer, vp and publisher of The Atlantic, said of paid amplification for native ads. The Atlantic uses SimpleReach and hired Sam Rosen from DigitasLBi a year ago as vp, marketing to help in that effort.

Vox Media, for its part, is looking for a head of paid media strategy. The person hired will help the publisher find look-alike audiences for advertisers beyond its family of sites, said Jonathan Hunt, Vox Media’s head of marketing. Vox Media is looking for someone with at least five years of experience in buying and planning, with a strong understanding of emerging platforms, according to a job description.

 

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Mobile video to accelerate mobile advertising value proposition

Mobile Marketer
Recent comScore data indicates mobile media consumption is the most used form of digital media consumption, which should intuitively correlate to a tipping point in spend. Yet, there still remains debate as our industry struggles to allocate traditional brand marketing dollars to this opportunity.
While we study location, search and programmatic ways to streamline and simplify mobile advertising transactions, the most immediate opportunity will occur within the mobile video space, which remains the highest growth medium in the digital landscape.
As such, it bears mentioning some fundamental factors to best leverage your video message.
Friendly post
Whether brands elect to play in the comfort zones with premium off-network mobile video applications from the big networks and cable providers or elect to jump into the emerging, somewhat unknown and more fragmented space of mobile gaming publishers with upstarts such as Viggle or anime stalwarts, the opportunity is substantial.

Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

IDG Connect 0811 Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

With video consumption on the rise, audiences today expect to able to receive information that is easy to digest and also engaging. It is predicted that by 2016, 1.6 billion people will be watching video online, and the growth of video traffic on the web will rise from 57% to 69% by 2017. As a result, a million minutes of video content will cross the network every second in 2017.

Given the eminence and influence video content will have over the next few years it could become one of the marketing department’s most powerful tools. Videos can be shared as compelling content that can help attract new customers, encourage existing ones to upgrade to a new product or spread product information quickly and efficiently.

Short videos can even be used as an alternative to lengthy text descriptions, telephone calls and face-to-face demonstrations to help a customer chose the right product for them. James McQuivey from Forrester Research believes that one minute of video can be equivalent to 1.8 million words. Video can provide easily accessible, on-demand information that is also engaging to a wider customer base.

Creating video content that is audience-tailored and accessible across multiple devices can keep digital marketing initiatives on the road to success. One quick and easy method of content creation is screencasting. Screencasting software records everything on your screen from applications and mouse clicks to your audio commentary. Screencasting technology is efficient since little investment is required for equipment and unlike working with video cameras or other videography equipment, very little training is needed.

To make successful screencasts, there are a few factors any marketer should consider:

Know Your Audience

With any video marketing initiative, understanding what makes your audience tick should be a priority. One video might be the right hook for a particular viewer, however could completely miss the mark for someone else.

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