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OMMA RTB (Real-Time Buying) @ Advertising Week

10/02/2014 New York NY

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10/07/2014 - 10/08/2014 New York NY

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10/14/2014 London

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10/21/2014 - 10/22/2014 Chicago IL

iMedia Breakthrough Summit: The Next Wave of Marketing

10/26/2014 - 10/28/2014 Stone Mountain Georgia

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10/28/2014 - 10/29/2014 New York NY

CIO Perspectives Houston

11/11/2014 San Jose CA

DEMO Fall 2014 

11/18/2014 - 11/20/2014 San Jose CA

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11/18/2014 Dallas TX

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo – Washington

12/03/2014 Washington D.C.

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Mobile video to accelerate mobile advertising value proposition

Mobile Marketer
Recent comScore data indicates mobile media consumption is the most used form of digital media consumption, which should intuitively correlate to a tipping point in spend. Yet, there still remains debate as our industry struggles to allocate traditional brand marketing dollars to this opportunity.
While we study location, search and programmatic ways to streamline and simplify mobile advertising transactions, the most immediate opportunity will occur within the mobile video space, which remains the highest growth medium in the digital landscape.
As such, it bears mentioning some fundamental factors to best leverage your video message.
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Whether brands elect to play in the comfort zones with premium off-network mobile video applications from the big networks and cable providers or elect to jump into the emerging, somewhat unknown and more fragmented space of mobile gaming publishers with upstarts such as Viggle or anime stalwarts, the opportunity is substantial.

Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

IDG Connect 0811 Tune Audiences Into Your Marketing Video Initiative

With video consumption on the rise, audiences today expect to able to receive information that is easy to digest and also engaging. It is predicted that by 2016, 1.6 billion people will be watching video online, and the growth of video traffic on the web will rise from 57% to 69% by 2017. As a result, a million minutes of video content will cross the network every second in 2017.

Given the eminence and influence video content will have over the next few years it could become one of the marketing department’s most powerful tools. Videos can be shared as compelling content that can help attract new customers, encourage existing ones to upgrade to a new product or spread product information quickly and efficiently.

Short videos can even be used as an alternative to lengthy text descriptions, telephone calls and face-to-face demonstrations to help a customer chose the right product for them. James McQuivey from Forrester Research believes that one minute of video can be equivalent to 1.8 million words. Video can provide easily accessible, on-demand information that is also engaging to a wider customer base.

Creating video content that is audience-tailored and accessible across multiple devices can keep digital marketing initiatives on the road to success. One quick and easy method of content creation is screencasting. Screencasting software records everything on your screen from applications and mouse clicks to your audio commentary. Screencasting technology is efficient since little investment is required for equipment and unlike working with video cameras or other videography equipment, very little training is needed.

To make successful screencasts, there are a few factors any marketer should consider:

Know Your Audience

With any video marketing initiative, understanding what makes your audience tick should be a priority. One video might be the right hook for a particular viewer, however could completely miss the mark for someone else.

Continue reading… 

New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

This in spite of tech marketing turmoil and transformation, as half of tech companies replaced CMO in last 24 months

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. – The 12th Annual Tech Marketing Benchmark Study from the International Data Corporation (IDCCMO Advisory Service finds that marketing budgets among the 101 technology companies surveyed will increase by an average of 3.5% in 2014. Those same companies expect a revenue increase of 3.7% for the same period. Despite this momentum, the CMO role remains very fluid as marketing organizations attempt to reinvent their capabilities and effectiveness in a new era of marketing. In a related study, IDC finds that 51% of tech CMO’s have been in their position for fewer than two years.

Two-thirds of the companies surveyed by IDC will increase their marketing budgets in 2014 while only 20% of the companies will decrease their marketing budgets with the remainder indicating no change in budget levels. Notably, companies with a high percentage of 3rd Platform products (cloud, social, mobile and Big Data and analytics) will receive marketing budget increases upwards of five times that of the average tech company, increasing their budgets 10-20% year over year.

“For the first time in eight years, IDC is seeing that marketing budgets are increasing at about the same rate as revenues. This is positive news for tech marketers and also a clear indication that the C-suite is ready to put additional marketing investment up against more promising business prospects,” saidSam Melnick, Senior Research Analyst, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, both the CMO and CEO must understand that momentum is being driven by success in 3rd Platform solution areas. To continue this growth, executives must continue to invest to be competitive in these high-upside segments.”

“We examined 152 tech companies with a current CMO in place and found that 77, just over half, have replaced their CMO in the last 24 months – an astonishing rate of change. CMOs must own the digital disruption of buyer experience for their companies. Those CMOs able to rise to the challenge will be provided more resources and given more power. The unprepared will be replaced,” said Kathleen Schaub, Vice President, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, tech CEOs must also wake up to the impact marketing now wields over revenue and reputation. It’s their job to pick the right person for today’s challenges. To get CMO selection right means the CEO needs to understand and get closer to marketing.”

The 12th annual 2014 Tech Marketing Benchmark Study was recently completed by IDC’s CMO Advisory Service and seeks to capture the full marketing spend and marketing headcount allocations of global companies within the technology sector. The research effort surveyed 101 companies, with the average company’s revenue surpassing $7 billion. IDC’s 2015 Marketing Investment Planner containing study details will be published in November and will be available on IDC.com. In a parallel study, the CMO Advisory Service studied 152 tech companies ranging from $50 million to $100 billion in revenue to observe their CMO tenure.

About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and business strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. In 2014, IDC celebrates its 50th anniversary of providing strategic insights to help clients achieve their key business objectives. IDC is a subsidiary of IDG, the world’s leading technology media, research, and events company. You can learn more about IDC by visiting www.idc.com. Follow IDC on Twitter at @IDC.

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11 Elements for Mobile Email Design

Mequoda

Designing email newsletter templates and email promotions for mobile devices has never been more important.

Mobile email design is a hot topic as the usage of mobile devices increases. After researching the topic in depth, I’ve come to some elements of mobile email design that should be considered in the development stage. Whether you’re sending an email newsletter or promoting a product or event, your email design needs to be optimized for mobile if your audience is viewing your content on the go. With the number of mobile users increasing, it’s very likely that a significant portion of your audience is using mobile. Here are a few tips for mobile email design.looking at mobile email design 11 Elements for Mobile Email Design

Mobile Email Design Element #1: Font size - Font for mobile emails needs to be larger than that of standard emails. Apple will automatically increase small font to be the minimum of 13 pixels. On Android devices, 16-18 scale-independent pixels are considered medium and large text sizes. Many designers recommend a minimum of 14 pixel font for body text and minimum of 22 pixel font for headlines.

Mobile Email Design Element #2: Concise headlines – I’m taking a note from app design tips for this one. Try working with a 35-character limit on headlines, and put your most important words up front.

Mobile Email Design Element #3: Design – Single and double column design tend to work the best in mobile, with single being favored by developers looking for complete simplicity. A double column design could work for an email newsletter with a full-text featured article. A single column design would increase clarity for snippet-based email newsletters.

Mobile Email Design Element #4: Proper Separation – Do not put clickable images or links side-by-side or your audience may have trouble clicking the desired link.

 Continue reading… 

Four great reasons why email will never, ever die

CITEworld

As we come back from vacation to an inbox filled with hundreds of emails, most of which we don’t need to read, we might let out an anguished bellow and ask: when will we fix email?

Everyone knows how awful it is: you get flooded, it’s pretend work, it’s inefficient, and so on. And everyone is looking for a way to fix email. And every once in a while, a new app comes along that promises to fix email. And every time, it fails. The reason why is that it can’t.

Sorry. It bothers me as much as it does you, but it’s just the truth. You’re not going to fix email. Here’s why.

Saturation

The simplest reason why email can’t be replaced is its 100% saturation. In enterprises today, everyone — and that means everyone — has email.

In business strategy, we often hear about network effects, whereby the value of a network is the square of the members of a network. This is thought to be a great competitive advantage, because network effects mean your business grows very fast as the network grows, and then is very hard to displace. eBay, for example, has a network effect: Because all the sellers are there, that’s where the buyers go; because that’s where the buyers are, that’s where the sellers go. That makes eBay’s business very robust.

But actually, very few networks achieve saturation, meaning that (for practical purposes) everyone is on the network. And there is a very big difference between using a communication network with almost everyone, and using one where there is everyone. Email is the latter. Alternatives to email, no matter how popular, are the former.

If displacing an ordinary network is hard, displacing a network with saturation is impossible. The barriers are too high. Everyone is already checking email, so everyone sends email. Because everyone sends email, everybody has to check email. It will never end.

Social networks don’t take care of all use cases and don’t have saturation

One big promise for “fixing email” is enterprise social networks – JiveYammer, and many others. To some extent, they have helped things. But anyone in a company that uses those social networks knows that they haven’t gotten rid of email. They can actually improve on some common use cases for email, like task management or quick-fire collaborative conversations. But they don’t take care of all, or even most, use cases. Your boss wants to send information about a major new corporate reorganization or strategy to all 150 people in his organization at once? That’s an email. A vendor wants to touch base in a semi-formal way without interrupting you via phone or email? That’s an email.

Continue reading… 

The growing market for digital video ads

Digiday

As online video consumption continues to climb, advertising budgets have swelled to match.

Much of that action happens on YouTube, which owns a huge chunk of the digital video ad market, but probably won’t capture much more in the coming years. It’s an exciting market for publishers, which are looking to counter declining display ad rates. The rise of programmatic buying also has enthused budget-savvy brands and agencies, and video publishers are slowly coming around to embrace the new tech.

Here’s what the market looks like today — and how it will take shape in the years to come.

The digital video ad market will grow faster in 2014 than future years.
The U.S. digital ad spend will grow to $5.9 billion this year, up 56 percent from 2013, according to eMarketer data released last week. But that growth will cool in future years, declining to 13.9 percent by 2018, when the total digital video spend will reach $12.82 billion, eMarketer forecasts.

The research firm cites two trends to explain the dwindling growth. The first: proliferation of premium subscription services like Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, which don’t serve ads. The second, less obvious factor: the growth of mobile video. Mobile video consumption has surged 532 percent since 2012, according to video technology specialist Ooyala. But mobile videos tend to be shorter, and have shorter, less expensive ads accompanying them, so that sector actually suppresses the overall market, eMarketer reasons.

Read on for charts and more information…

Mobile ad measurement begins to evolve beyond click-through rates

The Economist has introduced new mobile advertising analytics that focus on user attention to measure campaign success as the call grows louder for measurement standards addressing the unique qualities of smartphone engagement better than impressions served and click-through rates. 

The need for different data sets to measure mobile advertising is supported by a new report from xAd, which reveals that click-through rates on mobile are a poor indicator of whether or not someone will engage in post-click activities or visit a store. The Economist sees offering new metrics as a way to help its clients run more successful mobile ad campaigns.

“We’re offering TimeGuarantee and ViewGuarantee, and highlighting attention metrics more generally with clients, because we think it is a much better performance indicator for brand campaigns than just impressions and clicks,” said Audra Martin, vice president of digital advertising at The Economist.

Read on…

Native ads are getting a direct-response makeover

Digiday

Native advertising is often used by publishers as a way out of being held to the direct-response metrics that have long been associated with banner ads.

Native was supposed to be a premium ad format that would bolster falling digital CPMs, and it has mainly been viewed as an image-building format. But it was only a matter of time before advertisers would start to demand more than just a lift in awareness or improved reputation and ask for ads that directly drive sales or leads.

Case in point: this ad for The New York Times that’s running on Mashable. The ad has a direct come-on to new digital customers, with a “subscribe” button that’s prominently placed to the right of its branded article. It’s part of a month-long campaign the Times is running on Mashable to drive audience growth.

 Native ads are getting a direct response makeover

The practice is more established among B2B marketers, for whom the format is well suited for white-paper downloads and webinar signups. Lexis Nexis, for example, used this ad on Law.com to drum up business for its MedMal navigator product. But consumer publishers are increasingly hearing requests for native ads to include calls to action.

Continue reading… 

InfoWorld.com Site Relaunch Leads to Enhanced Reader and Advertiser Experience

 InfoWorld.com Site Relaunch Leads to Enhanced Reader and Advertiser Experience

Usability and consistency across mobile devices ensured through responsive design

Framingham, Mass. – Sept. 17, 2014 – IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company composed of Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, ITworld and CITEworld—announces the enriched design and functionality of InfoWorld.com. The award-winning site, known for its early identification of essential tech trends, now incorporates responsive design technology to scale editorial and advertising content to the users’ screen size, whether they are accessing InfoWorld.com from a smartphone, tablet or desktop (Click to Tweet).

“As mobile continues to grow as a leading content access tool, technology decision-makers search for information on whatever device is presently available,” said Peter Longo, CEO, U.S. Media, IDG Communications.  “The innovation of the new design allows our audience to stay up-to-date on recent trends, be in the know on new developments and engage with expert tech contributors, as well as provide a platform for tech marketers to engage this audience anytime, anywhere.”

Website Enhancements Include:

  • The use of responsive design, including HTML5 and CSS3, to ensure usability and consistency for visitors using smartphones, tablets or desktops.
  • Bold design with more prominent graphics and less pagination for a smoother reading experience and deeper engagement.
  • Vastly improved navigation for InfoWorld’s trademark mix of enterprise tech analysis, product reviews and thought leadership presented through new site sections.
  • Increased exposure for InfoWorld’s expert authors to flag tech trends early.
  • New site-wide promos for important news and trends tailored to InfoWorld’s technically savvy audience.
  • Single, searchable “Resource Library” supporting all types of lead generation content.
  • Shared functionality across IDG Enterprise sites for seamless execution of banner ads, lead generation and native advertising, making promotions more effective.

Continue reading… 

Managing Marketing Assets in Today’s Digital Economy

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Managing Marketing Assets in Today’s Digital Economy

Samantha Warnes, Senior Solution Consultant of Digital Asset Management & Customer Experience Management at OpenText, looks at how organisations need to re-examine the creation, collaboration, production and distribution of digital media to deliver a richer digital marketing experience.

In today’s connected world, marketers are expected to manage content that caters to a richer digital experience. Digital assets have to be available, agile and consistent. Gone are the days when business departments could operate in silos. Now different units have to work with marketing to make the most of content across every distribution point – regardless of whether that is online, physical, over mobile, or even print.

However, ensuring that marketing content – regardless of size or format – is agile and can move at the speed required, means rethinking how digital assets are managed. Organisations need to automate the management of all assets, across all available mediums and consider the following five key areas:

1. Collecting: In the creation and storage of marketing assets, content should be collected and automated to provide a single, authoritative system for all types of marketing media. The result should be a digital asset management system without silos, massive email files, or guesswork as to the correct asset needed for a specific marketing purpose.

2. Managing: The ability to organise, categorise and apply appropriate rights policies to link related assets ensures rich marketing media can be managed efficiently.

Continue reading…