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‘Context not programmatic volumes key to curbing ineffective mobile ads’ says gaming publisher

Source: The Drum

Contextual targeting not programmatic-driven volumes are key to premiumising mobile media amid the flurry of ineffective ads being “blindly bought” through ad networks, claims gaming publisher Gameloft.

It is why the business opened its ad inventory direct to marketers four months ago and why it has recently started talking to them like a media owner rather than a publisher. Simply put, this shift means it no longer peddles a performance-based model based on cost-per acquisition, and instead stresses the ability to drive brand-led metrics now that it sells its own media.

It is a risky and somewhat old-fashioned approach at a time when publishers are opting to sell through networks or programmatically in an attempt to maximise their ad yield.

However, this means brands are more likely to buy blind from publishers, claimed Gameloft’s UK and Ireland country manager David Whitby. Instead, the company combines user data from either Facebook Connect or Google Play with data from its games to create what Whitby said is a “fairly good profile” with which it can sell.

To get brands onside, it is introducing a flurry of formats, from videos that play between levels to branded in-game events in the hope of giving its native media a different slant versus what’s on offer from other publishers. And while the ads are proving effective, with its videos getting upwards of 65 per cent for completed views, there is still a massive job to become an influential player in the mobile space.

“Every planner you talk to says mobile is a nightmare because they don’t know where their booked ads are running. If you didn’t know what TV ad slots you’d bought it would seem ridiculous but on mobile its considered acceptable right now for some reason,” said Whitby.

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CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

acer logo e1435248713675 CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

Program ran in United Kingdom

GOAL

Educate and inspire gift-givers about the benefits of computing products in enhancing the lives of their loved ones while increasing awareness of Acer brand & products. Screen Shot 2015 06 25 at 12.03.33 PM CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

SOLUTION

Leverage the reach & influence of premium IDG editorial media outlets to deploy a dual-function program aimed at engaging target consumer audiences on two levels:

NativeNews Package  (Hub, Articles, Videos, Article Spotlight, Sponsored Article Posts & Newsletters):

Built platforms aimed at engaging target audiences, providing extensive brand exposure and communicating Acer’s messaging. Custom articles and video scripts were authored by IDG subject-matter experts and were hosted on IDG properties. Custom ad units ran in tandem with the native activities to promote content and reinforce brand recognition.

Custom Built Ad Units (Mobile & Desktop Product Line Showcase & InFunnel Ad Units):

This was an interactive solution utilized to create awareness, provide information and ultimately drive consideration and sales.

RESULTS

  • High average time spent on site (3:54mins) and a high overall average video completion rate (73%).
  • 38% of all video views were on the IDG-produced videos.
  • Impressions: 1,352,434 ; Page views: 6,682

2015 Unified Communications & Collaboration Study

 2015 Unified Communications & Collaboration Study

The 2015 Unified Communications & Collaboration (UC&C) Study encompasses the information needed to fully grasp the current UC&C market. The research includes the direction of spending, areas of investment, business drivers and challenges that IT decision-makers are experiencing when it comes to communication tools in their organization.

Key Findings:

  • Unified Communications & Collaboration will see a surge of adoption in the next 3 years. 56% percent of enterprise and 66% of SMB organizations plan to implement or upgrade UC&C solutions within the next year. (Click to Tweet)
  • Unified communications and collaboration budgets will increase by 9% in the next year.(Click to Tweet)
  • Within the next two years, organizations will move their UC&C model to hybrid and cloud-based environments, with enterprise organizations leading the change. (Click to Tweet)
  • Traditional technologies remain the top forms of employee communication, but enterprises are increasing their use of videoconferencing and telepresence technologies. (Click to Tweet)
  • Security/privacy concerns are a challenge when it comes to UC&C implementation.(Click to Tweet)
  • Security, ease of use and total cost of ownership are the biggest factors when evaluating vendor solutions, but integration into existing infrastructure shows high importance for enterprises. (Click to Tweet)

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Content Marketing: Tech Marketers vs. B2B Marketers

Content Marketing Institute, Marketing Profs, IDG

Throughout this report, you’ll see how technology marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year and how they compare with the overall sample of B2B marketers who completed our annual content marketing survey. This infographic shows thats tech marketers and B2B marketers share similar content marketing challenges and initiatives.

Download the full report here.

diff between tech and b2b marketers4 Content Marketing: Tech Marketers vs. B2B Marketers

The Shifting Digital Landscape

Source: AudienceScience

An Advertiser’s Guide to Targeting, Technology, and Transparency

Introduction

Global digital advertising is nearly an £88 billion industry and advertisers continue to spend more and more on digital. AudienceScience® has found that the way in which advertisers buy media and target their digital advertising is changing, helped by advances in technology, but there are still major hurdles that inhibit an advertiser’s digital success. In order to better understand this shifting landscape, AudienceScience worked with both BSB Media and The Vision Network to launch the second annual International Media Image Survey (I-MIS), a unique study conducted during May and June 2014. Run in conjunction with the International Advertising Association, Warc and M&M Global, the study provides insight into advertisers of various sizes, ranging from Small Advertisers (<£12m) to Mega Advertisers (£40m+). Interviews were conducted by InSites Consulting with senior decision makers at over 80 advertisers globally, and were administered via an online questionnaire.

Key Takeaways

Global advertisers are changing the way they buy and target digital media. More than half of Mega Advertisers (£40m+) plan to spend more on programmatic buying and real-time bidding (RTB).

The way advertisers buy media is changing.

Advertisers continue to shift more money towards programmatic buying and RTB, with 88% of advertisers planning on buying as much or more media via programmatic buying and RTB. This shift accompanies advertisers shifting budget away from traditional, content-based ad buys and towards data-driven audience targeting. In fact, 82% of advertisers plan on allocating a larger percentage of their budget to audience-targeted buys.

Advertisers are taking greater advertising ownership.

For greater digital success and increased efficiencies, advertisers are starting to realise that they need a better understanding of digital ad technology. 43% of advertisers plan to bring more responsibility in-house for digital planning and 47% of advertisers feel that having in-depth technology knowledge in-house is a factor that will help make them most successful in digital advertising.

Opacity and complexity remain major problems for digital advertising.

Major advertiser trade groups like the World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) have made advertising transparency a major theme in 2014. This should be no surprise: advertisers see opacity in digital advertising as a significant issue, and one that’s only getting worse. 69% of advertisers said that media trading transparency across the industry has either stayed the same or declined compared to a few years ago. Most advertisers feel that this lack of transparency and the overall complexity of the ecosystem are the biggest problems with digital advertising today.

Check out the PDF here…

Which Content Marketing Initiatives Are B2B Tech Marketers Working On?

Content Marketing Institute, Marketing Profs, IDG

Throughout this report, you’ll see how technology marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year and how they compare with the overall sample of B2B marketers who completed our annual content marketing survey. Among all groups we studied this year, technology marketers are the most likely to use content marketing. They’re also the group that is most focused on lead generation as the primary goal for their content marketing efforts. Producing engaging content continues to be a challenge for technology marketers; however, 73% are presently working on initiatives to improve in this area. View the infographic below to see which content marketing initiatives B2B tech marketers are working on today and tomorrow…

Download the full report here

WATCH A VIDEO on paid, owned, earned content marketing trends from this research

CMI Initiatives 19 Which Content Marketing Initiatives Are B2B Tech Marketers Working On?

Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

IDG Connect 0811 Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

This is a contributed piece from Eneas Bernardo, Managing Director Brazil, RED

This article is the story of a conflict, between what the Millennial generation of IT staff is expecting, and what the business environment is demanding. It’s about what’s happening in Brazil – but it applies to some extent everywhere in the world.

Does IT matter?

The story starts a few years ago in 2003, when, in an article, Nicholas Carr stated, “IT doesn’t matter”. With this statement, Carr threw cold water over the industry. His article brought to light the darkest fear of the IT sector: that rather than be recognized as a business advantage, it was being seen mostly as a cost.

This fear had already been felt to some extent by the ‘mainframe generation’, also known as baby boomers. It might have been sensed, and probably ignored, by their younger cousins, the ‘Downsizers’ or ‘Generation X’.

But the youngest generation in the workforce, the ‘Netties’ or ‘Generation Y’, had grown up in a world where IT was all around and to them it was ever-present. Regardless of Carr’s predictions, IT continued to play a key role, at least for the time being.

Increasing pressures

Moving forward to the next scene in our story, we see the pressure over IT projects increasing on staff. And, as they struggle to gain the elusive benefits of IT that they still believe are there, many companies are spending more and more money on ERP and other buzzwords that promised competitive advantage and best practices – and the gold ticket for growth and profitability.

Cut to the next scene: the global financial crisis of the 2000s and 2010s. To respond, organisations kicked off a desperate pursuit for cost cutting, and strove to innovate in order to survive – let alone be profitable.

What it means for staff

What’s been the impact on staff of these recent trends?

With unemployment at the highest rates since the great depression, there are also more people to educate, more people to feed, and more people to employ. At the same time, businesses are looking for fewer employees.

Business targets and plans are also piling on the pressure. Projects are shortened, costs are reviewed, and staffing is reduced – so the people who remain need to handle more and more duties. Staff must take on more projects, deliverables and targets. They need to handle quality assurance, to consider new issues such as sustainability, and to evaluate information and data coming from many sources such as financials, manufacturing, human resources, customer relationship management and the supply chain.

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The King of Late Night… and of Content Marketing: What your B2B brand can learn from Jimmy Fallon

Dix & Eaton

As the Content Marketing World conference and expo descends upon Cleveland this week, I can’t help but think about who’s doing content marketing well. I’ll tell you who I think is doing a great job of content marketing: Jimmy Fallon. He has mastered the art of repurposing content and distributing it across multiple channels, all while keeping the ultimate goal – his audience, not himself – in mind.

So what can your B2B brand learn from Jimmy Fallon’s content marketing efforts?

Create bite-sized pieces of content

fallon facebook examples The King of Late Night… and of Content Marketing: What your B2B brand can learn from Jimmy Fallon

Fallon does an excellent job of breaking apart his hour-long show into smaller, more consumable pieces of content, then distributing them across multiple platforms. (Check out The Tonight Show’s Facebook page if you want to see some examples.) How can you apply that concept to your organization? I’d suggest starting with pieces of content you already have which may be large or overwhelming in their totality. For example, do you produce technical or white papers? Consider creating an infographic breaking down one of the concepts talked about in that paper, or having an engineer do a short video explaining it. It’s about making the content you have consumable – think in terms of many small bites rather than one huge, heavy meal.

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Mobile ad spending to hit $100B in 2016 and become the biggest digital ad market

VentureBeat

Mobile ad spending is on a tear. It will top $100 billion in 2016 and account for more than 50 percent of all digital ads for the first time, according to market researcher eMarketer.

More than $101.37 billion will be spent on ads served in 2016 to mobile phones and tablets worldwide. That’s a 400 percent increase from 2013. From 2016 to 2019, mobile ads will nearly double again, rising to $195.55 billion. That figure will account for 70.1 percent of all digital advertising as well as more than one-quarter of total media ad spending worldwide.

It’s all about the number of consumers adopting mobile devices. As that number soars, marketers are chasing consumers into mobile markets. Next year, eMarketer estimates, there will be more than 2 billion smartphone users worldwide, more than one-quarter of whom will be in China.

The number of tablet users worldwide is growing more slowly than the global smartphone audience. But tablets will reach more than 1 billion users in 2015. eMarketer said that in many emerging and developing markets, consumers are often accessing the Internet mobile-first and mobile-only, driving marketers to mobile advertising.

The U.S. and China will drive mobile ads in the short term. In 2016, U.S. advertisers are expected to spend $40.2 billion on mobile ads, more than doubling the total from 2014. In China, advertisers will spend $22.1 billion next year, triple the amount spent in 2014. In both countries, mobile will become the majority of all digital advertising next year.

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Facebook’s New App That Will Make Video Content HUGE

Quartz

Facebook has rolled out a new app that lets friends (and subsequently their network of friends and so on) add clips to an ongoing video focused on a single topic—April Fool’s Day, for instance. It’s potentially a game-changer for advertisers on the social network, which eventually could use the app to engage directly with consumers. And it’s another example of Facebook’s growing emphasis on video.

It’s easy to envision how the new app, Riff, might have been used during last year’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which over the course of three months generated more than 17 million videos posted on Facebook while raising awareness and money to fight Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The video-driven campaign contributed to the huge increase in the number of video posts on Facebook last year—up 94% in the US and 75% globally. In January, the company said that video views on the social network had reached 3 billion a day. “If you go back five years ago, a lot of Facebook was primarily text, right, and a little bit of photos,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg told investors. “Now, I think the primary mode that people are using to share is photos, and I wouldn’t be surprised if in the future that shifted more and more towards videos.”

Facebook’s challenge is getting users to see the value of Riff. The few companies that have ventured into this niche haven’t seen major success. JumpCam, for instance, ranks No. 1,346 in the App Store’s social networking category, according to App Annie. CompetitorsMixBitCollabraCam, and Vyclone haven’t fared much better in the rankings.

But Facebook is pressing on with its video efforts—at its developer conference last week it announced plans to bring immersive videos with 360° perspective to the social network and its virtual-reality platform, Oculus.

“What really matters is that consumers are using video on Facebook, because that gives us an opportunity, one, to provide a great consumer experience, but two, to have ads match that consumer experience,” chief operating office Sheryl Sandberg said on the company’s most recent quarterly earnings call. “If there wasn’t consumer video on Facebook, video ads in your news feed would be very jarring.”

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