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03/30/2015 - 04/01/2015 Amelia Island FL

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CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data & Analytics Initiatives

 CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data & Analytics Initiatives

IDG Enterprise’s 2015 Big Data and Analytics research highlights momentum behind big data deployment, investments areas and challenges

Framingham, Mass.—March 9, 2015—IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analytics research, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.

Big Data – A Year Later
Deployment of data-driven projects has increased by 125% in the past year (Click to Tweet), with 27% of organizations already in deployment. The momentum continues with an additional 42% of organizations still planning implementation. As more ITDMs deploy data initiatives, it provides clarity into the amount of data that needs to be managed. Similar to 2014, organizations are currently managing an average of 167.3TB of data, and this amount is expected to increase by 48% over the next 12 to 18 months. The largest contributors to this data growth are customer databases (63%), emails (61%), and transactional data (53%) (View Infographic).

In 2014, with big data showing the potential to create cross-function business opportunities, CEOs were the leading supporter of data-driven initiatives and CIOs were taking the strategic lead. Today, the CEO is still involved however, many individuals collaborate during the decision process, including the CIO (52%), CEO (43%), IT/networking staff (37%), CFO (36%), and IT steering committee (35%). At the end of the day, the CIO still takes the strategic lead and is in charge of data-driven decisions. Even with the CEO’s support, organizations are facing challenges with their big data initiatives, from limited budget (47%), to legacy issues (40%), and limited skilled employees that can analyze data (38%).

“Big data and analytics continues to be a priority and a growth area for organizations. CIOs are deploying data-driven tools that help advance the business through strategic and timely decision-making,” said Brian Glynn, chief revenue officer of IDG Enterprise. “As deployment moves towards mainstream, tech vendors have the opportunity to elevate their customers’ initiatives and potentially alleviate organizational and staffing challenges by providing solutions that integrate into legacy systems and provide an ease of use.”

Continue reading… 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Survey

CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data and Analytics Initiatives

Dataversity

A new article reports, “IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analyticsresearch, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.”

The article goes on, “Deployment of data-driven projects has increased by 125% in the past year, with 27% of organizations already in deployment. The momentum continues with an additional 42% of organizations still planning implementation. As more ITDMs deploy data initiatives, it provides clarity into the amount of data that needs to be managed. Similar to 2014, organizations are currently managing an average of 167.3TB of data, and this amount is expected to increase by 48% over the next 12 to 18 months. The largest contributors to this data growth are customer databases (63%), emails (61%), and transactional data (53%).”

Continue Reading…

IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

 IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

Framingham, Mass.—March 9, 2015—IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analytics research, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Survey

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Infographic

Gamification Can Help People Actually Use Analytics Tools

Harvard Business Review

If you’re trying to use advanced analytics to improve your organization’s decisions, join the club. Most of the companies I talk to are embarked on just such a quest. But it’s a rocky one.

The technological challenge is hard enough. You have to identify the right data and develop useful tools, such as predictive algorithms. But then comes an even tougher task: getting people to actually use the new tools.

Why is the people factor so important? It’s easy enough to automate routine decisions, such as identifying likely buyers for a product upgrade. But many decisions in today’s knowledge economy depend on expertise and experience. Think of bankers deciding on business loans, product developers determining tradeoffs between features and cost, or B2B sales reps figuring out which prospects to target. Analytics can help codify the logic of the best decision makers, but it can’t replace human judgment.

Moreover, the tools developed for contexts like these can be complex, often involving a steep learning curve. If decision makers aren’t willing to experiment with the tool and improve their outcomes over time, then your investment in the technology is wasted.

Right here, some say, is where a company could use gamification to encourage people to invest the time and learn how to use the new tools.

 

Gamification means using motivational techniques like those the videogame industry has put to such effective use. Anyone with teenagers in the house knows that they will spend long hours on their own, trying to get to the next level of their favorite game. Motivation experts like Dan Pink would say that the games are tapping into some basic human drives: for autonomy (you control your own pace), for mastery (you get better over time), and for a sense of purpose (you’re aiming at a well-defined goal). The social factor is important, too. Gamers love to match their skills against others and to compare notes on how they’re doing.

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The top demographic trends for every major social network

Business Insider

The demographics of who’s on what social network are shifting — older social networks are reaching maturity, while newer social messaging apps are gaining younger users fast.

In a report from BI Intelligence, we unpack data from over a dozen sources to understand how social media demographics are still shifting.

Purchase the full report >>

Here are a few of the key takeaways from the BI Intelligence report:

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This is Your Brain on Twitter

Medium

Twitter’s senior director of market research, Jeffrey Graham is always looking for ways to show the effectiveness of ad campaigns on Twitter — surveys, home visits, data models.

One of the more interesting studies involved two groups of people watching the NCAA basketball tournament on television. One group was permitted to bring their phones and tweet all they wanted. The other had to leave their phones outside and somehow manage without a second screen. Both groups had sweat monitors on their wrists and foreheads, a pulse rate monitor, and eye tracking goggles, to track how engaged they were. In comparison with the no-device crowd, the metrics went wild for the group permitted to tweet. “For people able to do Twitter and TV at the same time, there was a huge lift versus people who were just watching TV,” says Twitter’s global president of revenue and partnerships, Adam Bain.

But Graham felt that Twitter could really make a mark using a technology he learned about in an advertising research association’s report. It described how using neuroscience could get you other unavailable data, stuff from the subconscious reaches of people’s minds.

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Three Alternatives to Improve A Reader’s User Experience

Medium

At De Correspondent, a Dutch journalism platform with 30,000 paying subscribers (60 p/y), we’re all about providing context to the world in a thoughtful and in-depth way. This takes an effort, both from our writers as our readers. Because, after years and years of being bombarded with ever easier content, how do you get readers to take the time again to start reading longer publications online?

One of the most distracting phenomenons during reading are links. They keep pointing us to directions that are probably valuable, but at the same time force us to make a decision: to click or not to click.

These links are the backbone of the internet. And yet, no improvements have made to this quintessential part of the web for decades. We took up the challenge. Here’s how.

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2015 Will See The Rise Of Dark Social

MediaPost

Dark social is the sharing activity that is somewhat invisible to traditional analytics. It’s the culmination of referrals and sharing of content that originates from instant messages, e-mails containing links, and most recently, the rise of ephemeral social communication platforms such as Snapchat, WeChat and WhatsApp.

A majority of focus today is on social broadcast platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. With the tides shifting toward ephemeral social communication applications as a key driver of sharing, the attribution data of the share — and all of the value that comes with it — is essentially untapped and, in some cases, simply unknown.

According to a recent Radium One study, 59% of all online sharing is via dark social. Further, a whopping 91% of Americans regularly share information via dark social methods. This study also showed that 72% of sharing is simply users copying and pasting long URLs and either e-mailing or texting the information.

There are a significant number of conversations — and more importantly, potential intent — from a marketing perspective that is simply being ignored and untapped. Currently, there’s an over-reliance on retargeting. Dark social could represent an opportunity to bring balance to the equation.

Read more here… 

Four New IDC MaturityScape Benchmarks to Assist CIOs, IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve Industry Superiority

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 Four New IDC MaturityScape Benchmarks to Assist CIOs, IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve Industry Superiority

New reports explore enterprise architecture, enterprise IT transformation, vendor and sourcing management, and service management

Framingham, MA – October 6, 2014 – International Data Corporation (IDC) today announced four new IDC MaturityScape Benchmark studies, providing organizations a unique opportunity to compare maturity against that of peers with the IDC MaturityScape system of dimensions and sub-dimensions. The four IDC MaturityScape Benchmark studies explore Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT), Vendor and Sourcing Management, and Service Management. These studies build on IDC MaturityScapes, unveiled earlier this year, which provide a structured way for organizations to identify their current level of capability or maturity, and the gap between where they are and where they should be to maintain competitive balance or achieve industry superiority.

  • ClicktoTweet, “@IDC Releases Four New #IDCMaturityScapeBenchmarks to Assist CIOs, #IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve #IndustrySuperiority”

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise Architecture in the United States

This IDC study presents the results of IDC’s 2014 MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise Architecture Survey, a companion to IDC MaturityScape: Enterprise Architecture (IDC # 247401, March 2014). This pair of studies provides an opportunity for enterprise-class organizations to benchmark themselves against other similarly sized organizations in terms of their enterprise architecture maturity, to uncover maturity gaps among different dimensions, and to plan for improvement. These studies enable CIOs, IT executives, and other senior leaders to optimize decision making from both a business and a technical perspective.

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT)

This IDC study presents the results of IDC’s global 2014 Enterprise IT Transformation MaturityScape Benchmark Survey, and complements IDC MaturityScape: Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT) (IDC # 248141, April 2014). The new study enables organizations to assess their capabilities with regard to 3rd Platform strategy and innovation, to identify maturity gaps among different dimensions and areas of capability that need improvement, and to take actions to achieve the level of maturity that satisfies their business needs.

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Vendor and Sourcing Management in the United States

This study presents the results of IDC’s 2014 Vendor and Sourcing Management MaturityScape Benchmark Survey and is a supplement to IDC MaturityScape: Vendor and Sourcing Management — A Framework to Maximize Value and Drive Innovation (IDC # 247458, March 2014). This IDC study provides an opportunity for organizations to benchmark their VSM maturity against the industry standard, assess IT vendor and sourcing management competency and maturity and, most important, prioritize their VSM-related investment decisions.

For the full release, click here

Why most people aren’t downloading apps anymore

Quartz

In August, a widely reported report from comScore, a measurement firm, concluded that the majority of smartphone users in the United States download precisely zero apps in any given month.

 Why most people aren’t downloading apps anymore

“One possible explanation is that people just don’t need that many apps, and the apps people already have are more than suitable for most functions,” speculated Quartz’s Dan Frommer at the time. New datafrom Localytics, an app analytics firm which tracks 28,000 apps across 1.5 billion global devices, lends some evidence to this theory.

According to Localytics, the amount of time people spend within apps has shot up by a fifth over the past year, helping app use alone outpace all desktop computer use. Moreover, people are launching apps more often, up from 9.4 times to 11.5 times a month.

Driving this increase in use is the stickiness, to use a Silicon Valley term, of the apps people already use. It will surprise nobody that the categories with the most significant uptick in time used fall into categories of music, health and fitness, and social networking.

Continue reading…