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Digital Marketing Strategy: The Importance of Language

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Digital Marketing Strategy: The Importance of Language

There’s no doubt that we’re living in an increasingly multilingual society. It actually takes 20 languages to communicate with 80% of the world’s online population. However, according to a report from Common Sense Advisory (CSA), content in English has dominated the web “while companies have catered to Anglophone markets and the enormous spending they generate”. Despite this, English isn’t in fact the only prime language of ecommerce.

When it comes to business, people like being marketed to in their native language and, more often than not, that’s not English. We’ve commissioned a year-long study into the behaviour of the millennial generation (aged 18-36) looking at how their behaviour is forcing businesses to adapt their digital marketing approaches. A key focus for us within this has been the impact language has on marketing techniques. We surveyed 1,800 millennials and found that 32% of the millennial generation in English-speaking markets actually prefer a language other than English. What’s more, 46% are more likely to make a purchase if information is presented in their preferred language. These findings are supported by the CSA’s report which highlighted that 75% of online shoppers are more likely to buy products from websites in their language and 74% are more likely to purchase from the same brand again, if the after-sales care is in their mother tongue.

More so than any generation previously, it’s the millennials who are causing the biggest headache for marketers. They’re far more demanding than their predecessors and expect content to be delivered to them across their preferred device, channel and more importantly, in their preferred language. Figures like those above demonstrate just how language needs to be an integral part of any global digital marketing and customer experience strategy. If you don’t have this factored in then you risk alienating a significant proportion of your target audience, reducing the likelihood of driving brand advocacy and sales.

But how can marketers easily deliver high-quality multilingual content to their customers? It often seems particularly difficult to accomplish this in such a fast-moving, multinational market where millennials interact online and through social media. Digital marketers need to implement solutions that will enable them to translate potentially high volumes of high quality content into multiple languages, and deliver this at speed.

A great example of a business committed to offering its customers this service is B2B travel providerGTA, part of the Kuoni Group. GTA is growing fast, with already thousands of customers in 185 countries worldwide and processes over 21,000 bookings per day in more than 25 languages online. The company has recognised the importance of localising its content – tens of thousands of hotel and ground travel descriptions – to its global customer base, particularly as it continues to grow exponentially. It aims to deliver a seamless and personalised customer experience by addressing cultural differences.

Continue reading… 

 

Macworld to end print edition

New York Post

Peter Longo, just tapped to be the CEO of a newly formed US Media at International Data Group, is making some sweeping changes that appear to be turning the company’s longtime model on its head.

After 30 years, Macworld is ending its print publication with the November issue. It laid off the bulk of its editorial staffers Wednesday. It will survive only as a digital and expo business in the US, although print editions will still be produced overseas.

The changes are part of a bigger restructuring being put in place by Longo, who is based in New York. His Manhattan base is a big change for the company that has always centered its US publications around Boston and San Francisco.

There were also apparently cutbacks at PC World, TechHive and Greenbot — other digital publications published by IDG, which still counts Boston as its worldwide HQ.

Longo had been the CEO of IDG TechNetwork as well as chief digital officer of the overall IDG. Under his umbrella will be publications including CIO, CSO, Computerworld, Greenbot, InfoWorld, ITWorld, Macworld, Network World, PC World and TechHive.

Macworld was one of the last print titles in the stable. PC World had gone all-digital a year ago. Currently, only CIO is still publishing a print edition in the US.

While editorial was hit Sept. 10, it appears sweeping changes will affect the ad sales force as well in a big consolidation.

“We will transition the IDG Enterprise media sales organization from a brand-based to a geography-based structure to make it simpler for our clients to do business with us,” the company said in a statement.

Continue reading…

 

How LinkedIn hopes to become a gold mine of customers

CITEworld

LinkedIn was started as a social network for job seekers. It’s grown into a site where professionals build their networks, making connections that can help in their current positions and that might help in reaching career goals.

Now LinkedIn wants to become something more. In July it announced plans toacquire Bizo, a business-to-business marketing platform. It turns out, LinkedIn thinks it can build a $1 billion business out of B2B marketing, according to a leaked document that Business Insider posted. The document lays out LinkedIn’s vision to get into the marketing business, and how Bizo fits into what LinkedIn has already started.

The biggest change will be that LinkedIn plans to do more beyond its own Web site. LinkedIn already has some programs for businesses, like selling sponsored posts in users’ LinkedIn feeds. But LinkedIn’s programs so far are all centered around the LinkedIn site.

Bizo’s platform lets marketers show ads to targeted people on a network of thousands of websites, including business publications. Customers also get tools that let them track their web visitors through a Bizo ad to find out if they buy something or if a certain kind of visitor clicks on certain pages.

The leaked document shows that LinkedIn plans to continue offering the advertising service and will integrate it with its sponsored posts offering, so that businesses will be able to display sponsored posts on LinkedIn to people who have visited their Web site. It will also add mobile advertising capabilities to Bizo, which doesn’t already offer that. Plus, LinkedIn business customers will get the better tracking capabilities from Bizo.

“We believe we have unique assets that enable us to build a winning and highly differentiated solution,” the document reads. “Specifically, our key differentiators are best-in-class data, quality audience, and context, the professional graph, which powers account-based marketing and sales intelligence, and our publishing platform and media products.”

LinkedIn said it had no comment about the document.

On paper, the idea isn’t bad. LinkedIn has built a large network — it claims about 300 million users — most of whom are business people. When they turn to the site, it’s probably with business in mind — they’re not going to LinkedIn to be amused or look at pictures of their friends’ kids, as they might with Facebook. With Bizo, LinkedIn can offer businesses a connection to LinkedIn people who have also visited their Web sites.

But LinkedIn will have some work to do to change its image from one that hosts a bunch of job seekers to one that serves up potential customers. Would businesses like Lenovo and Zendesk, who are current Bizo customers, think of LinkedIn as a go-to vendor for B2B marketing? If LinkedIn hadn’t made the Bizo acquisition, probably not.

According to the leaked document, LinkedIn thinks it can reach $1 billion by 2017 with this new line of business. The company is hoping to launch integrated products by the first quarter 2015. Between now and then, it will have to work hard to show potential customers why they should think of LinkedIn in a new light.

 

61% of Consumers Prefer Companies With Custom Online Content

Mashable

Content marketing campaigns have become essential for marketers to engage audiences and generate leads. In fact, more than half of all consumers are more likely to buy from companies that create custom content.

But one of the biggest challenges B2B and B2C marketers face is measuring ROI. Only 27% of marketers track content metrics effectively.

Luckily, the folks at Captora created a graphic visualizing new data on metrics of success, which types of content have the highest ROI, the best days to share content on social media and more.

Take a look at the infographic below to help organize your content marketing goals and make strategic decisions about effective content.

Captora Mashable 61% of Consumers Prefer Companies With Custom Online Content

IDG SMS Wins Social Media Award for Samsung Program

Media Shepherd

mediaShepherd LLC—a web-based company that provides “actionable intelligence” for media brands—announces the winners of the first-ever mediaShepherd Social Media Awards (mSSm Awards). The awards recognize the best of social media efforts focused around a specific campaign, publication, brand or company in various sectors of the media industry.

The 2014 mSSm winners are:

• The Onion. Consumer media brand. The Onion’s overall social media strategy has gained the satirical-news brand millions of followers on Facebook (more than 4.25 million), Twitter (more than 6 million) and Google+ (nearly 2 million). It effectively integrates its YouTube channel with content across all platforms and has a high level of audience engagement.

• Modern Salon. Business-to-business media brand. Modern Salon has an impressive social media following, especially for a b-to-b brand, with more than 34,000 Twitter followers, more than 290,000 Facebook fans, more than 47,000 followers on Instagram, and more than 3,000 pins on Pinterest. It utilizes a variety of techniques and opportunities to promote its brand via social media, including promotion of a live broadcast of the North American Hairstyling Awards ceremony and reliance on unpaid partner promotion (via partners’—such as Aveda, Paul Mitchell and beauty schools—social media sites). Modern Salon also focuses on sharing high-quality images.

• IDG Enterprise. Business-to-business/custom marketing. IDG Strategic Marketing Services created a custom social media marketing campaign on behalf of its client Starcom/Samsung, called “Tablets in the Enterprise.” The campaign included Twitter chats using a unique hashtag to facilitate conversations around key messages and drive awareness of the topic and related solutions. Other components of the campaign included a custom survey on tablet use in the enterprise, infographics, white papers and videos. The campaign, which engaged influential bloggers and IT leaders, reached 513,000 via its #Tablechat discussions, and nearly 8 million impressions.

• MVP Media/Turnbuckle Magazine. Niche/enthusiast media. MVP Media fostered a significant community on Twitter from scratch for the launch of its interactive, digital Turnbuckle Magazine. The campaign achieved a reach exceeding 1 million Twitter users as per reports from SumAll, as well as impressive brand exposure via viral posts that captured hundreds of retweets/favorites. The combined retweet-and-mention reach surpassed 3 million in each of the last two weeks of the campaign, and suprassed 10 million in the last 5 weeks.

• OneName Global (OnG). Publishing industry vendor.  OneName Global utilized a variety of social media platforms, but focused its efforts on Facebook and viral content to grow traffic to OnG’s Facebook page as well as convert traffic to its onenameglobal.com website in advance of the company’s launch in the marketplace. As of Feb. 1, the site averaged 25-30 visitors per day, and via its social media campaign increased that to more than 8,000 visitors a day by the end of February. Since the campaign began, OnG experienced a significant increase in website traffic, totaling 48,745 visitors from the campaign’s start to finish. The company anticipated reaching 30,000 users per day by its launch, a metric which it exceeded (by far). According to Alexa.com, the company was one of the fastest-growing/ranking sites online toward the end of its campaign.

The entries were judged by a panel of social media experts in the publishing industry, and were evaluated based on innovation, campaign execution and level of achievement, budget and staff size, support of the brand, viral nature of the campaigns, among other factors.

US B2B advertising dips

Warc

Overall B2B advertising in the US dipped 0.5% to $10.2bn in 2013 according to a new study which shows the top 100 pulling away from everyone else.

Ad Age DataCenter’s analysis of measured-media spending data from Kantar Media – including estimates of spending across TV, internet (display ads only), magazines, newspapers, radio and outdoor – found that the top 100 B2B advertisers accounted for almost half of the total at $4.9bn. This represented a 3.4% increase on the previous year and stood in marked contrast to the remainder which registered a 3.8% fall in spending.

Advertising Age noted that this mirrored a trend already observed in the overall advertising market which had seen media spending rise fastest among the biggest advertisers (up 3.2% for the top 100, up 33% for 101-1,000 and down 6.6% for the smallest spenders).

Leading B2B advertisers were evidently being increasingly selective about their approach as they increased spending on internet display advertising, TV and outdoor but reduced it in all other media categories.

Internet was the fastest-growing medium for the top 100, up 25.3% in 2013, surpassing magazine spending for the first time. TV and outdoor rose rather more modestly, at 3.0% and 2.4% respectively.

Radio was hardest hit among the remaining media, as spending there declined 13.7%, while newspapers were also badly affected (-9.4%); magazines, however, fared relatively well, as expenditure in both B2B and consumer titles was down only 0.3%.

The top B2B advertiser in 2013 was Microsoft, whose spending jumped 34.6% to an estimated $290.6m. It was followed by Apple, whose B2B expenditure leapt 39% to an estimated $218.1m, and AT&T, up 6.6% to $201.3m.

The top ten B2B advertisers were rounded out by, in order, Verizon Communications, Google, Samsung, IBM Corp., Berkshire Hathaway, Intuit and Office Depot.

Companies Link for Success White Paper

 Companies Link for Success White Paper

Alliance marketing is becoming a critical component in successful technology companies. Often formed to promote a new device, unified solution or concept, alliances can give companies greater market presence in areas that, alone, they may face more competition. Given the growing importance of alliance marketing efforts, IDG Enterprise sponsored research across the B2B Technology Marketing Community on LinkedIn to help marketers benchmark their efforts against those of their peers. The results of that research, plus insights from leading alliance marketers, have been combined into a white paper designed to help elevate your alliance marketing efforts.

This white paper will provide insight into:

  • Key ingredients for strong alliance partnerships.
  • Common challenges faced within alliances.
  • Common tactics used and how are those executed.
  • How success is measured.

Please or in order to access this content.

Navigating Through the Noise of Big Data

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Navigating Through the Noise of Big Data

Marketing teams all over the world are being tasked with meeting increasingly higher customer outreach goals yet industry data for the last five years show the percentage of marketing representatives hitting their numbers has plateaued. That’s even after accounting for the recovery from the great recession. At the same time, marketers and sales people are being inundated with endless noise and chatter from news sites, analyst reports, Twitter feeds and blog posts. Trying to decipher any meaningful insight about customers, prospects or markets can leave little time for actual interaction.

Tools for conducting business analytics to cut through big data noise do exist but until recently have required “braniac” data scientists to use, but that is slowly changing. Personal business analytics are making their way to the front line of sales, providing access to the exact information they need to drive intelligent conversations with key prospects to help meet ambitious revenue goals.

Focusing on Relevant Content

Time spent on account research and demand generation is, on average, taking up one-fifth of a person’s workweek. Many companies are just starting to use business analytics to help their marketing and sales teams identify how customers will react at certain conversion points in their customer revenue cycle. These insights are typically derived from mining data collected in their CRM, ERP, customer support and other internal information systems as well as unstructured data from the Business Web. In doing a peer group analysis of existing customers, they are able to generate a profile of what a highly qualified prospective customer actually looks like.

Relevant analytics to focus on include

  • Specific vertical opportunities and industry shifts
  • Identifying real-time risks and opportunities that your solutions match
  • Building strategy around changing characteristics of your customers and markets
  • Competitor activity and strategies

If packaged and presented properly, technology can act as a digital research assistant by showing the opportunities to pursue and the insights needed to develop effective and strategic marketing or sales plans.

Maintaining Strategic Outreach

Customers today can get a wealth of information about a vendor’s products or services via a variety of online options including your web site, your competitor’s site, reading analyst blogs, joining networking groups within social media services such as LinkedIn, and more. They also have high expectations for customer engagement by demanding that it delivers value at every interaction with them in order to win their business.

The messaging many hyper-growth companies use is no longer centered on the product they sell, but rather on understanding trending business issues, why those problems exist, and how to have the best solution to effectively deal with those issues. For example, it’s especially important for B2B sales teams to identify real-time deep insights on their customers’ business expansions and exits in order to align with that customers present and future needs.

Being effective at this, and being seen as a solution consultant, can significantly increase lead conversion rates and increase customer retention. By aligning solutions with real customer needs, marketers can deliver to their sales teams valuable tools that will enable them to have strategic conversations with their executive buyers, leading to shorter sales cycles and bigger deals. 

In Practice

Even though business intelligence has been readily available across many functional teams in the past, it has not been fully optimized in support of sales driven activities. If a marketer wanted to gather insight about emerging technologies, industry trends, or competitive moves, they typically had to reach out to a small internal analyst team for help, search a broad internal library, or perform their own searches on the internet. Today, when the entire team can easily access and understand their targeted customer, they can be more effective at achieving overall revenue growth.

By weeding out the influx of unnecessary data and maintaining focus on the relevant emerging customer trends and information, teams are now able to access business intelligence more efficiently and effectively- regardless of when and where they need it. A company’s effectiveness at helping their marketing and sales teams bridge their product expertise to become new business problem solvers is going to be what dictates whom the market leaders are.

Click here for more blogs and research from IDG Connect 

2014 B2B Tech Content Marketing Trends: Tailoring Content, Tactic Effectiveness, Social Media

Looking for insight into how technology marketers are using content marketing? Check out Content Marketing Institute’s newest research report, 2014 B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING TRENDS — BUDGETS, BENCHMARKS, AND TRENDS, NORTH AMERICA, sponsored by International Data Group (IDG).

This infographic video focuses on how tech marketers tailor content, tactic effectiveness, and social media usage.

Click here to view an INFOGRAPHIC on this research

To register for this event, click here

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Why Giants Aren’t Always What They Seem

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Why Giants Aren’t Always What They Seem

Success in today’s marketplace hinges on innovation. Behemoth enterprises know that in order to stay competitive they need to constantly diversify and improve on their offerings. They need to harness the latest and greatest technologies – but these technologies can’t be made in these large companies’ labs. 

The new technologies are being built in incubators and startups at lightning speeds. Currently, there are 940 vendors in the marketing technology space offering innovative, disruptive solutions, and a lot of consolidation has already taken place here. The giants are relying on the little guys to drive innovation, which is why these small and mid-sized businesses are so important.

Innovation is moving downstream, and with it, marketing automation. In its 2014 Marketing Automation BuyerView, technology guidance firm Software Advice found that 50% of all businesses interested in marketing automation were in the SMB space, and that 90% were considering the technology for the very first time. Similarly, Forrester Research’s most recent Wave report pointed to several vendors who had already taken notice of this windfall, and had developed platforms specific to the small to mid-market consumer.

The lesson to be learned in all this is a simple one: businesses today are looking to move beyond the monolithic, enterprise-level suites of old, toward smaller, smarter, more flexible marketing solutions. In other words, bigger really isn’t better, and the giants of past eras aren’t nearly as gigantic as they once seemed.

For proof of this point, we need only consider the following facts. The marketing automation industry has grown by 50% annually for a number of years now, but has managed only to penetrate a mere 3% of non-tech companies in the mid-market. This leaves open a segment opportunity worth up to $8bn, and yet it is often passed over.

The few businesses that have been savvy enough to tap into this space have reaped tremendous rewards as a result. Act-On, for instance, has garnered 2100 customers across verticals like finance, insurance, agriculture, and manufacturing. Better still, the deals they’ve won have largely been noncompetitive, and from companies that were familiar with marketing automation already but unsure as to what solutions to choose.

More importantly, a great deal of innovation has already taken place at the mid-market level for this one reason: the more modern their marketing techniques are, the better chance small businesses have of competing against larger peers.

As Forrester notes in its recent Wave report, the B2B space for marketing automation is tipped to explode in the coming year, and will likely be driven by small, tech startups; slightly more than 50% of companies in this space already use automated lead-to-revenue management platforms to fuel sales pipelines, improve process maturity, and improve collaboration between sales and marketing. And it won’t be long before others follow suit.

All signs tell us that the days of marketing giants have come and gone. The future of marketing automation will be shaped by the plucky, ever-agile small and mid-market players.

For more blogs and research from IDG Connect, click here