Upcoming Events
No Events

advertising-marketing

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Why Digital Marketers Must Drive the Customer Journey

IDG Connect 0811 Why Digital Marketers Must Drive the Customer Journey

Handing off customers, from marketing to sales to customer service, seems a bit jolting in today’s digital world. These days, customers own the online social relationship, and they don’t want to be passed around like a hot potato. They demand one group to guide them through the customer journey.

More often than not, this group is the digital marketing team.

Death of a salesman

Already there are signs that marketers are pushing out salespeople. Forrester predicts one million B2B sales jobs will disappear in the coming years, as customers research and purchase goods online. At DEMO Traction in San Francisco last week, many startup tech companies said they don’t even employ salespeople.
On the post-sale side, a fight has broken out on social media between marketers and customer service pros over control of the customer relationship. Customers don’t want to pick up a phone and call customer support anymore. They want answers online, where marketers hold sway yet aren’t good at providing customer service.

“Initially seen as an outbound channel for marketing, social media soon also saw consumers seeking customer service, something marketing teams were ill-prepared to handle,” writes Forrester analyst Ian Jacobs in a brief entitled Take Social Customer Service Beyond Your Own Walled Garden.

See this infographic on the marketing cycle…

Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

 

 Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

Jonathan Pritchard, Managing Partner, Tangent Snowball

Jonathan has been with Tangent for ten years. Responsible for loyalty strategy and CRM planning at the agency, his experience covers Walkers Crisps, Carlsberg, Sky and Wolseley. He has devised, scoped, developed and deployed large scale tech developments, loyalty programmes, as well as advising clients on contact and content strategy.

Having spent many years advising clients on how best to use data to create relevant strategies and campaigns, here Jonathan shares his top tips on how to ensure a personalised customer experience in the b2b sector.

A new stage of personalisation is dawning; one of ‘hyper-personalisation’ and ‘marketing to the segment of one.’ It could be argued that personalisation is now entering its golden age.

Marketing within b2b is particularly suited to data-driven personalised marketing. This is because of the many different customer touch-points, the complex nature of their journeys, and the varying depth of involvement with each business.

However, the large amount of administration required in b2b means that companies have a rich source of vital information: the data. Coupling the data with the tools and your propositions makes for a powerful mix, despite lean budgets and resource.

1.    Remember: you’re still dealing with people

The most important thing to remember is that, whomever your audience comprises of – b2b technology marketers and IT decision makers perhaps – you are always dealing with people. The distinction between this, and B2C, is that customers here will be focussed on their company’s objectives, rather than their personal needs.  So how do you best address these? By presenting what you do in a humanised way. Reading up on behavioural economics will stand you in good stead here.

2.    Invest in your data

Many b2b businesses rely on relationships throughout the organisation to deliver on their objectives. It is key that everyone has the appropriate access to customer data to understand how best to serve that customer. In b2b, customer service is your key differential in often crowded market places. Your data will unlock a great deal of insight.

Continue Reading…

Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora

Talking New Media

Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market

NEW YORK, NY – April 13, 2015 – Madison Logic Data, the premier provider of demographic and intent data solutions for leading B2B marketers worldwide, today announced that it has rebranded as Bombora. Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market.

Bombora’s growing database of interest areas for 245 million business decision makers and more than 2 million unique companies worldwide, creates efficiencies across all aspects of the B2B sales and marketing stacks, including email marketing, site personalization, inside sales, lead scoring, and content creation. With more than 1 billion business interactions each month, Bombora has become the B2B standard in providing scale for B2B applications.

bomboralogolgTestNew 300x85 Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora“Behavioral intent data has proven its worth as a vital targeting tool, but unfortunately, most B2B marketers’ access to that data is fragmented, making it more difficult to gain a holistic view of one’s customers and prospects,” said Bombora CEO Erik Matlick. “Bombora breaks down the data silos that cause that fragmentation, consolidating data to enable the entire B2B marketing industry to better understand what companies and individual end users are interested in at any given time.”

During its six-month incubation period as Madison Logic Data, Bombora has already provided an unrivaled volume of high-quality B2B intent data that enables marketers to improve efficiencies and boost engagement throughout the customer journey. Here is what partners and customers are saying about Bombora:

“Bombora allows us to offer granular interest-based targeting to our advertising partners, as well as next generation post campaign analytics,” says Ann Marionovich, Vice President, Advertising Strategy at Forbes Media.

Continue reading… 

Google Says Millennial Influence on the Rise in B2B Buying

AdAge

Millennial influence within b-to-b buying decision groups is growing rapidly, according to a new study by Google and the research house Millward BrownDigital.

According to the study, 46% of potential buyers researching b-to-b products are millennials today, up from 27% in 2012. They’re now the biggest generational group researching b-to-b products for potential purchase. “We saw a big shift in a two-year time span in the number of millennials that are in the b-to-b purchase path,” said Mike Miller, Google’s director of business and industrial markets.

 Google Says Millennial Influence on the Rise in B2B Buying

The data comes from more than 3,000 interviews conducted in 2014 and Millward Brown’s multi-million person panel of internet users who allow the collection of their browsing behavior. Mr. Miller said he believes millennial influence is growing as the baby boomer generation moves toward retirement age. He also cited overall economic growth as a factor bringing more millennials into b-to-b businesses.

Digital Signals
Google also studied the digital behaviors of those participating in b-to-b buying decisions and found a big shift in mobile usage. Thirty-four percent of people involved in the b-to-b buying decisions in 2014 used their mobile devices across each stage of the purchase. In 2012, the number was 18%. Mr. Miller said he believes the increase indicates more b-to-b marketers are buying on mobile devices, as opposed to just researching there.

Continue Reading… 

Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

IDG Connect 0811 Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

Large buying teams and mixed constituencies make it more difficult to sell effectively. Buyers are people first, buying team members second which causes emotion-based goals influence buying decisions.

IDG Connect’s emotional and buyer personas research has found that emotion plays a critical role in the decision making process.

This infographic outlines:

  • The 3 distinct persona types in buying teams
  • Why it pays to arm to the advocates
  • 4 Steps to leverage emotion in your persona pursuit

EmotionalMarketing Infographic: Emotionally Charged B2B Marketing

Download full infographic here…

LinkedIn Ad Services & B2B Marketers Turn to Digital

IDG Connect 0811 LinkedIn Ad Services & B2B Marketers Turn to Digital

In this week’s marketing news roundup I will be focusing on LinkedIn’s new B2B ad services and B2B marketers turning to digital.

LinkedIn Launches B2B Ad Services

Last week LinkedIn launched two new ad products, Lead Accelerator and Network Display. These allow B2B brands to search for sales leads and place ads across various websites as well as its own. The professional social network has partnered with AppNexus to deliver ads based on LinkedIn data not only on LinkedIn’s site and apps, but a network of 2,500 of other business-focused websites.

This announcement follows LinkedIn’s recent acquisition of B2B marketing platform Bizo. The acquisition, which cost the social media company $175 million, looks like it has been busy with its new toy as it’s set to take on the advertising world.

linkedin lead accelerator product image 1 1002x625 LinkedIn Ad Services & B2B Marketers Turn to Digital

Source: Marketing Week

The Lead Accelerator product allows brands to place a pixel on their websites, which uses cookies to identify LinkedIn users so advertisers can get a better understanding as to the types of people visiting.  This captures missing details of professionals who have visited brand websites by overlaying anonymised LinkedIn data over the brand’s site traffic.

To reach these users, LinkedIn’s Network Display will use its targeting insights to retarget visitors to third party websites and on its own platform. This will allow marketers to deliver relevant content to the right audience.

It seems this is just the beginning of LinkedIn’s expansion into the B2B marketing space. With these type of offerings and access to 347 million professionals, LinkedIn’s positioning looks promising.

Read more…

 

Customer Experience Tops Asia/Pacific CMOs’ Investment Agenda

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Customer Experience Tops Asia/Pacific CMOs Investment Agenda

Singapore and Hong Kong, February 16, 2015 – International Data Corporation (IDC) announces today that this year customer experience will become the number one customer-related priority for organizations in Asia Pacific (excluding Japan) or APEJ. However, the CMO and CIO will need to partner and align their goals to guarantee success.

“Today, being first to market, having the lowest price, or being the best does not necessarily help. Businesses need to be agile and give customers what they want 24/7. Customers may buy your products or services, but what keeps them coming back is the experience,” says Daniel-Zoe Jimenez, Senior Program Manager, Big Data, Analytics, Enterprise Applications & Social Lead IDC Asia/Pacific.

He advises marketers to become savvier about the business, data, and customers to address the “empowered buyer” needs. CMOs are expected to lead the enterprise transformation around customer experience. In fact, IDC Asia/Pacific CMO Barometer shows that 31% of CMO roles are expanding to include customer experience and support.

Jimenez notes, “The CMO role is evolving to incorporate new responsibilities. In other regions, we have seen organizations completely replacing this role with a Customer Experience Head.”

There is no denying there has been a lot of hype around customer experience and many organizations still struggle with the concept, since there are many moving pieces and intangibles. However, customer experience is far from being just today’s buzzword; it is a top priority for CMOs in 2015.

“If you are not already thinking about this then you are not listening to your customers. The idea of delivering greater experiences is not new; but what is different now is that organizations are increasingly focused on ensuring these initiatives are tracked and are using metrics that are closely aligned to the business,” says Jimenez.

 Read More… 

Using Custom Market Research to Tell Your Brand’s Story

ResearchLogoBLACK no 2nd IDG Using Custom Market Research to Tell Your Brand’s Story

By Jen Garofalo,

Many years ago in my old neighborhood, a woman around my age moved into the small apartment on the second floor of the house next door. We gradually got to know each other, and one day the obligatory question about what we each do for a living came up. I explained that I work in market research and gave her a few standard lines about my job that I typically reserve for these types of situations. Then I paused, waiting for her to jump in and tell me about herself.

“I’m a professional storyteller,” she said. I blinked. Wait, what?
Did she just say she’s a storyteller?

I was intrigued.  “Oh, are you a writer then?”  I asked.  “No, not exactly,” she said. “It’s oral story telling. I visit area schools and I tell my stories to the kids. The stories are factual and have been compiled by my family over many generations, but I try and tailor them to make them relevant for the kids and the issues they’re facing – for example, overcoming fears or dealing with bullies.”

Well, I thought to myself, a storyteller! How cool is that? That’s miles apart from what I do in the office every day.

After some thought though, I realized that what I do really isn’t so wildly different. As a market researcher, my job is also to help tell stories; stories about brands, to be more specific. A typical client’s goal – much like my storyteller friend – is to connect with their target audience and to be as relevant as possible to the world that audience lives in and works in every day. In other words, find out whaStoryTeller Using Custom Market Research to Tell Your Brand’s Storyt issues their target audience is facing, and tell their brand’s story in a way that will make sense to that audience.

Market research, when done well, can be a very useful tool in the storytelling process. Like most storytellers, when beginning a new project I start off in search of answers. I want to know about your brand. Why was it created? What is your brand’s mission? What problems will your brand help to solve? I also want to know about your target audience. Who are they? What are they trying to accomplish? What are their most pressing challenges?

Maybe you can answer this first line of questioning pretty easily. But in some cases, as with a new brand or entry into a new market, that might not be so. Broad-based industry research, market segmentation and customer or prospect surveys can help you learn more about your audience’s needs, so you can better understand where you need to focus the most time and energy.

All good stories follow a pattern – you get to know the characters and their history, you learn about their intentions and motives. Once you have that information, the story picks up momentum and things chug along pretty well. But then – plot twist! –unexpected challenges arise. There’s a conflict. For a brand, this could be a bold move on the part of a competitor, a new development in the industry, a data security breach, or a change in popular trends or opinions. Now we get to the climax of the story. How will your brand respond to this conflict? How will your customers respond? You’re making decisions in real time, and you need information fast. Custom research can be a valuable tool in times of change or crisis. Understanding emerging market trends, as well as customer mindsets and strategies, can help your brand respond appropriately to change and come out looking like a hero. Producing content fueled by third-party market research contributes to the image of your brand as a thought leader and a voice of authority and reason in uncertain times.

There is one big difference between a brand’s story and the kinds of stories that my friend tells. A brand’s story never ends, it’s always evolving. It’s a continuous cycle of learning about and connecting with the people who need your brand right now, in this moment – of discovering who those people are and what their needs are today.

Here are some ways in which custom market research can help you along that journey:

Continue reading… 

 

What’s your content “type”?

IDG GlobalSolutions Color Whats your content type?

Jason Gorud – Vice President – IDC/IDG

I am not a thought leader.

I will not pretend to be one.

What you are about to read is not thought leadership. It’s just something worth thinking about.

My current role gives me access to some of the most interesting, influential, technology in the B2B space. More importantly, it puts me in touch with the marketing professionals and media agencies that sit at the forefront of the promotion of these wonderful solutions. Having had the chance to meet so many brilliant people I consider myself blessed. I am continually amazed by the tactics, strategies and little “tricks” employed by individuals and firms alike as they go about their business of building brand, pipeline and awareness for their respective companies.

My firm is often called into an organization in an advisory capacity to help groups understand a myriad of market complexities faced by tech firm executives; market share, vertical trends, new market entry strategy, channel ecosystem challenges are just a few of the areas where we attempt impart insight and actionable advice.

I have noticed that the aspirational goal of nearly every marketing professional I speak with is to position their firm as a “thought leader”. Almost with out exception the meetings I have with my clients, irrespective of the solution being covered, will meander into familiar territory: a chat about how to ensure their firm is seen as the“thought leader” in the [insert any tech solution here] space. Whether it’s OpenStack, smart cities, Software Defined Networks, mobile devices, printer ink, or cat toys everyone is zealously certain their message (and by extension firm, people and solutions) should, nay MUST, carry within it the holy seed of true THOUGHT LEADERINESS ( hmmmmmmm #ThoughtLeaderiness??? ).

In fairness, some do accomplish this goal, but most do not. Just like good and evil, smart and dumb, beautiful and ugly, Bert and Ernie, normal me and me being terse are mutually exclusive, yet co-dependent opposites, so too is though leadership content and the mundane. In each case one must exist in order to define the other.

So how do tech (actually you could replace tech with ANY) companies establish this coveted pre-eminence in the market’s collective brain? Why through effective content marketing of course! Thought leadership doesn’t simply descend from heaven in the form of an omnipotent alpha-Geek imparting the one, true path to CIOs by doling out wisdom via a series of arcane, magical gestures and select speaking engagements. If only it were that simple and TED talks that productive.

We’ve all heard that content is king. I disagree.

“Content” is this gigantic, nebulous, unchained beast to which all marketers have all become addicted.

Ladies and gentlemen, all you fans of irony in general, I give you the Ouroboros of marketing! King Content is king because we are told it’s king!

Content is not a monarchy, it is a meritocracy where only the best shall rule. Sadly content creation is out of control.

Don’t believe me? As far back as 2010 Eric Schmidt estimated humans created, every two days, as much content (information) as we had from the dawn of civilization until 2003. That was five years ago! Granted this is all content for allpurposes, but you get the point. And since the tech landscape hasn’t gotten simpler, and the range of personas buying solutions continues to expand outside of the CIO’s office, you can bet tech marketers haven’t slowed down in their Sisyphean attempt to keep prospective buyers abreast of the best [insert tech solution here]in the market. On a personal level, one of my clients told me their firm generated over 3,000 pieces of unique content last quarter alone. When I asked why I was told (verbatim): “We want to be the thought leaders in this space.”

So if you want a super-stressed, time and attention span deficient, self-educating, hyper-connected, socially plugged-in customer to actually read and react to your message, you’d best chain this beast. He’s not reading 3,000 pieces. You’re lucky if he reads three. Ask yourself: what am I releasing into the market and for what purpose? Is it worth the time, money and effort to get CONTENT X into the mainstream (and track it’s effectiveness)?

Here’s a handy little chart to help evaluate content types. I call it the Jason’s-Self-Evident-Quadrant-for-Content-Analysis, or the slightly more sexy version for the content cognoscenti the JSEQfCA . It just rolls off the tongue.

01c5ef6 Whats your content type?

NOISE: Do you produce a lot of content filled with jargon, buzzwords, aphorisms and techno-speak? Are your corporate videos super slick, produced by an agency rep that’s trying to channel his or her inner Fellini? Congratulations, you have produced Noise. Of all 4 types, this adds the least value to the market. It is neither informative nor interesting. No one intentionally creates Noise just like I don’t intentionally try and annoy my partner. It just happens. You start out trying to get a compelling message to the market and the next minute you’re being rather aggressively told to stop watching reruns of Escape to River Cottage and take the dog down (NOW) to go pee. This type of content is often created with the assumption that what is being released into the market builds brand. It usually doesn’t.

YOUR ACTION: Lazy marketing. Stop making this all together. How can you tell it’s noise? If you redact logos and any reference to your company in it and a 3rd party has no idea who the content refers to or what action he or she is meant to take after consuming it, then you have Noise.

FACT SHEET: Do you dig tech specs? Is feature/functionality your particular area of strength? Enjoy commissioning 20 page white papers on why your solution performs better than your competitors in a test environment? You’ve got Fact Sheet content! Please note that while this is quite useful to many IT decision makers, and can be quite important in the short-listing process, it does very little to engage the reader. It’s the content equivalent of eating a Clif Bar. Oh sure it has nutrients and keeps you going, but no one ever uttered the phrase “Damn, that was a delicious Clif Bar”. Fact Sheet content educates on specs, but does little to provide the reader with context vis-a-vis the problem your solution addresses. For some reason tech marketers love handing this type of content out at industry events.

YOUR ACTION: Important stuff but use it sparingly and never in lead gen or brand building campaigns. This content is best supplied as an “upon request” item. How do you recognize Fact Sheet content? If you hand it to someone not in your industry and they come away utterly dazed and confused, but when presented to an expert they say something like “oh X is .05 nanoseconds faster than Y? Neat!” you have Fact Sheet content.

FAST FOOD: We’ve all eaten McDonalds. Admit it. You have. Once in a while it’s the meal of choice because it’s cheap, easily procured, comes with a toy in some cases, and quickly consumed. It’s (possibly) a little tastier than a Clif Bar but you won’t ever fondly look back on “the best McDonalds ever” that inspired you to eat all the items on the menu because it’s just so forgettable. “Snackable” content such as infographics, “gamified” content, Tweets, this article I’m writing, and the like fall into this category. It will keep the consumer engaged for a short period of time, is great for building awareness, and is excellent for driving potential clients to more “dense” content. Unfortunately it lacks gravitas and usually won’t get people thinking of you as the guru in any field.

YOUR ACTION: This stuff is easy to crank out, easy to burn through, is great if you need to go wide and want your message shared socially. Understand that it does very little to affect a purchasing decision the further down the funnel you go, but it does grab attention. And just like McD’s builds item after item repurposing the same basic materials – really how different is a Big Mac from a Quarter Pounder with Cheese- crafting this content using source material from, for example, Fact Sheet content is a great way to “compound”, improve ROMI and create message cohesion. It works best in social media and ad campaigns. How do you know if you have Fast Food on your hands? If you read it and your response is “Ok cool… So?”

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP: You don’t tell the market you’re a thought leader, it tells you. In a recent study my firm completed comprising of nearly 300 CIOs in AP, we found that outside of security and compliance, a whopping 69% of respondents viewed the driving of profitable revenue via innovation as their chief responsibility. For your content and firm to be viewed as “thought leader worthy”, you must speak to this mind-set. Great content doesn’t talk tech or product or market leadership, it speaks about enabling possibilities. It fearlessly sees around corners and inspires new perspectives. People want to buy from thought leaders. They want to work for thought leaders. They want to partner with thought leaders.

I’ve spent a lot of time discussing content form factor with respect to “types” but Thought Leader content can come in all shapes and sizes so there is no formulaic approach. What you say is more important than how you say it.

YOUR ACTION: This is tough. You can’t simply will this stuff into being any more than I could convince the students at my high school that I was cool back in the day. Stupid Northwood HS class of ’89… I digress. This is where you need to fundamentally begin applying the less-is-more approach to your broader content strategy. Focus and refine. Here’s a little trick: try having someone NOT in your industry interact with your content. See how they react. The ability to inspire the uninitiated is often a good litmus test.

So in closing I wish you all good luck in your pursuit of creating amazing content! #ThoughtLeaderiness!

Linkedin is the Favorite, Internet of Things & The Importance of Email

IDG Connect 0811 Linkedin is the Favorite, Internet of Things & The Importance of Email

While a lot of last week’s spotlight was on Katy Perry’s infamous Superbowl left shark, in the marketing world there was much talk about LinkedIn, the Internet of Things and Email.

Linkedin is the Favourite for B2B Tech Content

IT buyers still heavily rely upon traditional content to educate themselves throughout the customer journey. White papers are viewed as the most popular type of content buyers consume to receive analysis of technology or business issues and trends. However, more buyers are beginning to see the value of accessing content through social platforms.

As buyers are seeing this value, more marketers are beginning to adapt their content to social with 81% of marketers now creating content specifically for social media, according Eccolo Media report. However, when it comes to their platform of choice, their behaviour doesn’t match their expectations.

The report found while 21% of buyers receive vendor collateral through tweets, only 6% expect Twitter to be a source of content. Similarly, when asked which social channels they have received vendor content through, more respondents say Facebook than LinkedIn. But when asked which social channels they’re most likely to consume vendor content from, LinkedIn is the most popular platform. In other words, technology buyers actually receive more vendor content through Facebook but perceive LinkedIn as the more likely channel to receive such content.

This perceived preference for LinkedIn is supported from IDG Enterprise’s recent research which shows three-quarters of B2B technology buyers rely on LinkedIn, while less than half turn to Facebook. Demonstrating a brand victory for LinkedIn and opportunities for marketers in the future.

Read More…