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Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents say

PCworld

Internet companies have run amok with our personal data, and people aren’t entirely sure what to do about it, judging from the results of a new survey.

More than 90 percent of Americans feel they’ve lost control over how their personal information is collected and used by companies, particularly for advertising purposes, according to the results of a survey by the Pew Research Center, published Wednesday.

Eighty percent expressed concern over how third parties like advertisers accessed the data they share on social media sites. Pew did not gather the names of which sites specifically respondents meant, but you could likely venture a guess.

The survey, which polled 607 adults online, was the Washington, D.C.-based think tank’s first in a series to tackle Americans’ views toward surveilance 100042486 medium Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents sayprivacy after the leaks around government surveillance made by Edward Snowden last year.

The majority of respondents did indeed say that people should be concerned about whether the government is listening in on their phone calls, or viewing their online communications and other sensitive data.

But beyond government surveillance, the findings also reflect people’s attitudes amid the increasing sophistication by which Internet companies leverage people’s data for advertising.

“It’s a bundle of concerns,” said Lee Rainie, one of Pew’s lead researchers on the project, in an interview. “It’s partly surveillance, it’s partly tracking, and this generalized sense that I’m losing control of my identity and my data,” he said.

The constant flood of stories related to data breaches, whether it’s at Target, Snapchat, or P.F. Chang’s, don’t help either.

But voicing concern about the level of access companies, governments and other groups have to data is one thing; taking action in response is another.

Some respondents said they have taken actions to protect their privacy, like using a pseudonym, but a majority of respondents agreed that achieving anonymity online is not possible.

People’s concerns around privacy might be part of the trade-off in using a free service. Some 55 percent of respondents said they were willing to share “some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free.”

Continue reading… 

Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

IDG Connect 0811 Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

Something very special happened at last month’s Dreamforce conference in San Francisco. Will.i.am, one of the world’s biggest pop stars, launched his new smartband wearable device, the i.am.PULS – and the worlds of music, fashion, technology, mainstream and enterprise culture well and truly collided.

“I’m an ideas guy,” he said, and it’s true that will.i.am has been extremely busy in recent years investing in game-changing technologies as well as producing award-winning music. A true innovator, he contributed to the massive success of Beats headphones and developed the concept behind Ekocycle, Coca-Cola’s sustainable living brand.

This is a man whose vision of the future, as he explained on-stage with Marc Benioff earlier this year, has been influenced heavily by the pace of innovation in technology. Echoing Facebook’s mantra that technology’s evolutionary journey is only “1% finished,” will.i.am argued that the tech landscape will be “unrecognisable” in ten years’ time: “The thing on your wrist that talks to a phone…is not the future, it’s a starting point.”

The next revolution in connected devices

Shipments of wearables are projected to reach almost 112 million units in 2018, up from less than 20 million this year (IDC). As wearables proliferate, they will add to a vast universe of interconnected, smart devices. And when the inevitable take-off of wearables does arrive, the opportunities for brands will reach a new stratosphere as they look to own the customer journey.

Wearables are set to provide marketers with the purest view of the customer yet, in terms of the volume and immediacy of the data gathered. The rise of mobile and social prompted talk of always-on marketing, and the proliferation of wearables will further enable marketers to deliver the right message to the right user at the right time. Even better, because wearables are, by nature, deeply integrated into a daily lifestyle, marketers have an opportunity to learn more about their users than ever before.

Imagine what this could mean for your brand. How might you exploit this massive opportunity to improve customer service and make marketing messages more relevant?

Data, data, data

The key to cracking wearable tech for marketing lies in – you guessed it – data. If Mark Zuckerberg’s law (the rate of increase for social sharing) is accurate, in 10 years there will be more pieces of content shared every day (95 billion) than we currently share each month (89 billion).

Of course, as marketers we’ve been talking for a few years now about the importance of data in digital marketing. The challenge comes in tracking, filtering and measuring this data so that you have a true single view of the customer. The need to effectively leverage your customer data – including social data – is only going to increase as the number of consumer devices increases, and as wearables move into mainstream adoption. This will be crucial to providing the deeper levels of personalisation that customers now expect.

 

Continue reading… 

IDG Corporate Video 2015

idg logo1 IDG Corporate Video 2015

IDG is the world’s leading media, events, and research company reaching over 280 million technology buyings in 97 countries.

IDG Communications (a subsidiary of IDG) is the largest global technology media, data and services company. It delivers personalized and contextual-based experiences for the most powerful tech buyers.

From millennial tech enthusiasts to senior executives, IDG understands and reaches them all.

Chris Carmichael: Why Mobile Marketing Is Important

IDG GlobalSolutions Color Chris Carmichael: Why Mobile Marketing Is Important

We have asked the IDG Mobile Advisory Board why mobile marketing is crucial in the advertising mix. This is what Christopher Carmichael, Director of Media & Digital Marketing at Hewlett-Packard, said…

Mobility is one of HP’s core solutions within what we call the “New Style of IT” along with Cloud, Security and Big Data. Mobile is a trend that is not going to go away, and is equally important across the Consumer and Business worlds. From a marketing perspective, it’s early days still for the medium. And, as it is so often the case with a new medium or technology, people resent being interrupted with advertising at first, but gradually over time they start to accept it.

For mobile marketing, that means 3 things:

1. Some of the processes surrounding the medium are not there yet – the mechanics of planning and buying, the metrics and reporting etc.

2. Tech favours interruption rather than engagement or adding value in some way for consumers.

3. Brands need to take care not to annoy people, and to use the medium thoughtfully in a way that adds value.bit of thought can go a long way!

chris carmichael mobile quote short Chris Carmichael: Why Mobile Marketing Is Important

  • See what James Foulkes, Co-Founder of Kingpin Communications, says about mobile marketing…
  • See what Jon Hook, Head of Mobile at Mediacom International and Mediacom Beyond Advertising, says about mobility for business…

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE MOBILE@IDG PLAYBOOK 

 

2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

U.S. organizations are still losing the cyberwar to hackers according to the 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime survey, recently conducted by CSO, PwC, the U.S. Secret Service, and the CERT Division of Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The U.S. State of Cybercrime infographic illustrates the results from this survey as well as the continuing upheaval organizations face combatting cybercrime and the effects it is having and will continue to have on U.S. organizations.

For more information on the study, click here

cybercrime copy 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

Infographic: Everyday Big Data

Vouchercloud

Scientists and businesses often encounter difficulties in analysing huge data sets, otherwise known as “Big Data”. Its size is forever changing across many landscapes, with the amount of data created each day constantly increasing – now four times faster than the world economy. Every day we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data, which is enough to fill 10 million Blu-Ray discs, which in turn is enough to make a stack the size of 4 Eiffel Towers. Big doesn’t seem to be quite ‘big’ enough a word to describe how data is evolving.

The most astonishing thing about Big Data is the speed at which it is increasing. 90% of the world’s data, for example, was created in the last 2 years alone. The number of people with access to the internet today is equal to the world’s entire population in 1960 (3 billion). Global communication has never been easier and it might not come as much of a shock that there are 204 million emails sent per minute. But there are also 216,000 Instagram posts and 217,000 tweets. This is social and business conversation at its best.

The data collected through all these interactions is helping to shape the way we live our lives. As you can see below in the data graphic by vouchercloud it is helping us to save money (comparison websites, reducing energy bills, monitoring our fuel consumption and tailored coupons based on our previous spending habits). It is helping us to get around more efficiently – urban transport is improved using real time data capture and managing traffic hotspots by changing bus routes or traffic light sequences to ease congestion. Even more topical and important, it is helping us to save lives; streaming patient data to recognise outbreaks of illnesses and disease, identifying those at risk and managing the costs of treating patients.

Data is improving and expanding across mobile, digital media and social media, and Big Data is innovating the future ahead of us.

Big Data GRAPHIC1 e1413817382616 Infographic: Everyday Big Data

3 mistaken assumptions about what Big Data can do for you

CITEworld

Big data is certainly all the rage. The Wall Street Journal recently ran a piece ondata scientists commanding up to $300,000 per year with very little experience. Clearly the era of embracing big data is here.

However, since the tools and best practices in this area are so novel, it’s important to revisit our assumptions about what big data can do for us – and, perhaps more importantly, what it can’t do. Here are three commonly held yetmistaken assumptions about what big data can do for you and your business.

Big Data Can’t Predict the Future

Big data – and all of its analysis tools, commentary, science experiments and visualizations – can’t tell you what will happen in the future. Why? The data you collect comes entirely from the past. We’ve yet to reach the point at which we can collect data points and values from the future.

We can analyze what happened in the past and try to draw trends between actions and decision points and their consequences, based on the data, and we might use that to guess that under similar circumstances, if a similar decision were made, similar outcomes would occur as a result. But we can’t predict the future.

Many executives and organizations attempt to glean the future out of a mass of data. This is a bad idea, because the future is always changing. You know how financial advisers always use the line, “Past performance does not guarantee future results?” This maxim applies to big data as well.

Instead of trying to predict the future, use big data to optimize and enhance what’s currently true. Look at something that’s happening now and constructively improve upon the outcomes for that current event. Use the data to find the right questions to ask. Don’t try to use big data as a crystal ball.

Big Data Can’t Replace Your Values – or Your Company’s

Big data is a poor substitute for values – those mores and standards by which you live your life and your company endeavors to operate. Your choices on substantive issues may be more crystallized, and it may be easier and clearer to sort out the advantages and disadvantages of various courses of action, but the data itself can’t help you interpret how certain decisions stack up against the standards you set for yourself and for your company.

Data can paint all sorts of pictures, both in the numbers themselves and through the aid of visualization software. Your staff can create many projected scenarios about any given issue, but those results are simply that – a projection. Your job as an executive, and as a CIO making these sorts of tools and staff available within your business, is to actually reconcile that data against your company’s values.

For instance, imagine you’re a car manufacturer. Your big data sources and tools tell you that certain vehicle models have a flaw that may cost a few cents to repair on vehicles yet to be manufactured, but would cost significantly more to repair in vehicles that have already been purchased by customers and are in production use. The data, and thus your data scientists on staff, might recommend fixing the issue on cars still on the assembly line but not bothering to fix the cars already out there in the world, simply because the data might have shown the cost exceeded the likelihood of damages across the board.

(Note that this scenario may sound familiar to you if you have been following theGeneral Motors ignition switch saga. However, this is only a hypothetical example, and further, there is no evidence big data played into the GM recall.)

Say your company has a value statement that quality is job 1 and safety is of paramount importance. Though the data suggests a recall isn’t worth it, you make the call as an executive to start the recall. You’re informed, but you’re not controlled by big data.

Above all, it’s vital to remember that sometimes the right answer appears to be the wrong one when viewed through a different lens. Make sure you use the right lens.

Read more…

IDC Retail Insights Presents Big Data and Analytics Foundation for Next Generation Revenue Management

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 IDC Retail Insights Presents Big Data and Analytics Foundation for Next Generation Revenue Management

IDC Retail Insights  today announced the availability of a new report, “Business Strategy: Big Data and Analytics Lay the Foundation for Revenue Growth,” (Document # RI250177) which describes the Big data and analytics (BDA) foundation for revenue growth and charts the likely rapid evolution of new capabilities. The report presents a framework for understanding successive generations of product intelligence, leading to a new paradigm — participatory commerce. This paradigm trains evolved market intelligence on a much larger opportunity — the triple win of merchandise economics, promotional spend, and customer satisfaction.

  • ClicktoTweet, “@IDCInsights #IDCRetailInsights Presents #BigData&Analytics Foundation for #NextGeneration #RevenueManagement – will propel #BDA”

BDA will increase revenue growth through optimized pricing, and create new opportunities to improve assortments, new products, marketing, and other demand generators. Product intelligence creates new facets of market and competitive insight through price discovery in the near term, with broader reach into assortments, private labels, and management of private label and national brands. Within five years in the context of “give-to-get” shoppers, combined with forces like supply chain collaboration among retailers and brands, self-learning intelligent agents, and autonomous event-processing, product intelligence will lead to participatory commerce.

Key highlights of the report include:

  • In 2013, approximately 50% of retailers were aiming BDA at pricing strategies, market intelligence, and customer acquisition. More retailers will join their ranks over the next two to three years.
  • Price intelligence, a subset of product intelligence, is emerging as the initial set of capabilities aligned to support these BDA initiatives. Beyond discovering prices and supporting better pricing decisions, product intelligence sheds light on competitors’ pricing strategies and tactics, assortments, localization, and channel strategies as well as on consumer decision making when combined with psychological techniques.
  • Price discovery gives retailers a countermeasure in the “spy versus spy” world of price transparency, providing them an analytical advantage but leaving consumers with the edge when comparing prices online in the context of their purchase journeys. Next-best-action analytics remain a seller’s key tool against the consumer’s contextual advantage.
  • As already evident in the 2013 holiday shopping season — supported by price discovery, predictive analytics, and real-time ecommerce price management — high-speed algorithmic pricing will break constraints on price change cadences and create breakneck “channel chess” competition.
  • In the context of supply chain collaboration, give-to-get consumers, self-learning intelligent agents, and autonomous event-processing product intelligence will create opportunities for participatory commerce — marketplaces wherein transactions based on the buying, selling, and buying intentions of participating retailers, brands, and consumers will improve merchandise economics, returns on promotional spending, and customer satisfaction.

“In particular, one application of product intelligence, price discovery, gives retailers a countermeasure versus the ‘spy versus spy’ price transparency of retail today,” said Greg Girard, program director at IDC Retail Insights. “Next-generation product intelligence in consumer decision making, competitor tactics, and market conditions will propel BDA-based revenue initiatives beyond pricing further into marketing, assortments, buying, and product development.”

For additional information about this report or to arrange a one-on-one briefing with Greg Girard, please contact Sarah Murray at 781-378-2674 orsarah@attunecommunications.com. Reports are available to qualified members of the media. For information on purchasing reports, contact insights@idc.com; reporters should email sarah@attunecommunications.com.

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IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 IDC Retail Insights Arms Retailers with IoT Technology Strategy

IDC Retail Insights today announced the availability of a new report, “Business Strategy: Developing an IoT Technology Strategy,” (Document# RI250271), which outlines how retailers must plan now for IoT, even if IoT hasn’t made it to the top of the priorities list. According to the new report, applied IoT technology positively impacts top and bottom line business performance by improving omni-channel operations and enabling personalized and contextualized interaction with consumers. Understanding the technology landscape and defining a roadmap for IoT implementation requires uncommonly long range planning, but is rewarded with reduced long term implementation costs and total cost of ownership (TCO).

ClicktoTweet, “@IDCRetailInsights Arms #Retailers with #IoT Technology Strategy

The convergence of cloud, mobile, big data/analytics and sensors has created an opportunity for retailers to engage consumers and employees in radically new ways.  Within 5 years consumers will expect that retailers engage them with personalized and contextualized interactions. In the same time frame, if the retailer hasn’t figured out how to improve real time inventory accuracy to 98% or better, they will struggle to close the online or click and collect sale.

This report provides the following advice for retailers:

  • A definition of IoT technology
  • A thorough examination of the technology landscape for IoT (for retailers)
  • Specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy
  • Guidance for driving retail IoT programs forward

Leslie Hand, research director, IDC Retail Insights, reports that, “Retailers can improve operations, reduce risk and loss, and wow the consumer with IoT enabled capabilities. Now is the time to establish a strategy and develop a roadmap for IoT. A well thought out plan will guide the reduced cost of ownership of IoT technologies, and enable continued agility and innovation. ”

In another new report announced today, Business Strategy: Understanding the IoT Use Cases For Retail, many of the most common use cases that are being implemented today are discussed including product tracking / traceability, interactive consumer engagement and operations, mobile payments, asset management and fleet and yard management.

The IoT journey, rich in opportunities, is also full of challenges – the biggest of which is enabling tactical applications sometimes in isolation of a plan for an architecture designed for IoT. IoT requires an event oriented paradigm, which includes listening, bi-directional messaging, information distribution, and communications over a variety of networks. The architecture for IoT stretches the limits of retail legacy networks.  When evaluating IoT technologies, IDC Retail Insights recommends retailers gain an understanding of the technology landscape for the variety of technologies and the related intersection points as soon as possible

The new report outlines specific steps to developing a IoT technology strategy and emphasizes that retailers interested in engaging the omni-channel consumer with consistent personalized and increasingly contextualized physical and digital interactions, should consider how to build an architecture for IoT that will continue to adapt to consumer interaction patterns and needs. Meanwhile, technology vendors and consultants should help retail enterprises define and understand the IoT opportunities and the path forward.

To learn more about a related IoT report announced today, please visit”Business Strategy: IoT Use Cases for Retail,”

For additional information about this report or to arrange a one-on-one briefing with Leslie Hand please contact Sarah Murray at 781-378-2674 orsarah@attunecommunications.com. Reports are available to qualified members of the media. For information on purchasing reports, contact insights@idc.com; reporters should email sarah@attunecommunications.com.

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Price & Big Data for Marketers

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Price & Big Data for Marketers

Marketers have a wide choice of new software solutions that can help them be more productive, including automated lead-generation systems, customer tracking and social media tools. However, when it comes to leveraging big data to enhance revenue and profits, marketing professionals often overlook one of the classic four pillars of the marketing mix—price.  Yet those marketing executives who learn to harness the wealth of big data they already possess can gain substantial advantages and outperform their markets. 

While the marketing function in global businesses is often responsible for setting list prices for products and services, few marketers excel at the task. For distributors and retailers, this can mean a constant struggle to manage prices for thousands of SKUs, as well as associated discounts and promotions. Those suggested list prices can also be discounted during the sales process to close deals and maintain customer relationships.

Unfortunately, there is an unequal balance of power in the battle to maintain prices and margins in today’s highly competitive global marketplace.  That’s because marketing and sales teams frequently don’t utilise the kind of big data tools and insights their customers’ procurement departments possess when negotiating prices and contracts.

By adopting big data solutions to look across internal ERP and CRM data, as well as external marketplace information, you can free your marketing and sales functions from time-consuming, manual spreadsheet updates and other inefficient pricing practices. Analytical tools can efficiently process vast amounts of data to identify customer segments and provide insights into specific customer buying behaviours. Using information this way can also identify the key drivers or variables that influence buyers, and determine their willingness to pay a certain price for a given set of products and services.

As a result, you can begin to harmonise pricing practices across your organisation and align marketing and sales resources to achieve strategic as well as tactical goals. Instead of constantly reacting to price changes in the marketplace, you can test various marketing scenarios and take a more proactive approach to decisions. Harnessing the knowledge locked in your big data translates into the power to price more efficiently and profitably.

Let me offer an example. A global chemical company based in Europe was able to analyse and interpret available internal data, as well as external marketing information. With these combined resources, the organisation integrated pricing and competitive and transactional data in one centralised location.   

The chemical company gained immediate value. By allowing the company to organise incoming data and identify key customer segments, they found 10 key value-based customer-behaviour drivers. Collecting this vast amount of data from various sources and putting it together meant that the company could determine list prices, which they could adjust to help achieve strategic margin goals. In addition, big data enables the company to execute more informed pricing decisions in conjunction with field sales operations, providing specific pricing guidance during contract negotiations. None of this would be possible using traditional pricing and sales methods that frequently rely on outdated, manual spreadsheets.

Today, marketing and sales executives can use pricing technology solutions to simulate pricing and promotion campaigns as a predictive tool. Exploring and then choosing optimum pricing strategies, marketing and sales professionals can execute their campaigns then monitor and measure the results by regional markets, individual sales people and customer accounts.

In the case of our global chemical company, a pricing initiative led by marketing and sales executives established a new process for setting prices that incorporated a wide range of variables, including product bundling, freight and handling costs, payment terms, discounts and rebates, and exchange rates across global markets. The pricing project identified more than USD $20 million of potential revenue uplift within the first quarter of implementing its big data analysis. 

Given the growing complexity and competitive nature of global markets today, marketing and sales executives owe it to themselves and their companies to learn how to exploit the potential of big data in making better pricing and business decisions. The right tools and opportunities exist today. Those who act now will reap the rewards.

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