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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

Continue reading… 

IDG.tv to Unify Global Video Content

Yahoo! Finance

IDG Communications today announced strategic enhancements that will allow IDG.tv to give marketers unprecedented video reach, distribution and targeting in 97 countries and provide even more compelling video content to its audiences.

The company is unifying all of its video content from its tech media properties on a global basis, and recently launched IDG Studios, creating core content for its channels as well as original, episodic programming on IDG.tv for both enterprise and consumer technology audiences.

According to comScore Video Metrix, IDG was the #1 tech property in video in March 2015 with 9.93 million total unique viewers, thanks to its trusted and engaging insights, analysis and reviews from premium trusted media brands including CIO, NetworkWorld, MacWorld, PCWorld and outpacing its the nearest competitor AOL Tech by over 3.5 million unique viewers.

“IDG is a global, tech video content and distribution powerhouse. Our premium owned and operated brands and the broad reach of IDG TechNetwork, is a winning combination,” said Dina Roman, General Manager, IDG.tv. “Add to that a slate of original programming that offers unique sponsorships for marketers, and a unified, scaled global distribution platform that we can curate and control, IDG continues to provide a wide variety of targeting opportunities across an affluent, tech-savvy audience.”

As part of its new unified content strategy, IDG.tv will offer a consistent video programming calendar, with seasonal consumer and technology event-based themes, across all of its properties as well as on more than 500 sites in the IDG TechNetwork. IDG Studios’ new and original episodic programming will include original content for viewers, such as Hardcore HardwareBreakout Startups and WorldTech Update, as well as custom editorial series created on behalf of some of the world’s largest technology marketers.

Kyle Kramer, a proven digital video expert, was recruited from Vox Media to serve as IDG’s VP of Video Programming. Kramer served as Head of Production at Vox Media where he oversaw studio operations and award-winning production for all Vox Media properties, including The Verge, Polygon, SB Nation, Eater, Racked, Curbed & Vox.

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4 Media Types Every Marketer and PR Professional Needs

Heidi Cohen

Media is a key element of any marketing or PR plan. Marketers and PR professionals monitor, create and place content and their messages via different media types in order to expand their audience reach to attract and convert prospects.

Due to technology and the dynamic nature of online communications, media has evolved. As a result, how you use the different types of marketing media to achieve your goals and reap measurable results has changed.

 

4 Key types of media

In today’s information landscape, 4 key marketing media types have emerged. All 4 key types of media are critical to reaching your maximum potential target market and persuading prospects and retaining customers and fans. (BTW: (Here’s a snapshot of how we consume content and media.)

4 Key Types of Media Heidi Cohen Actionable Marketing Guide 4 Media Types Every Marketer and PR Professional Needs

1. Owned media

Includes all of the content and information you publish on platforms you own regardless of whether you’re an individual or an organization. It’s at the heart of content marketing (and here are 35 tactics to improve your content marketing). Here’s an example from Gini Dietrich’s Spin Sucks.

Key marketing characteristics of owned media:

  • Full control and discretion over content published. You decide what, when and how to publish your content.
  • Extends your own brand. This is critical reason to build and distribute content marketing on your own platforms. If you publish your content elsewhere first, ensure that you retain permission to post it on your own website later.
  • Tends to have a smaller reach, especially compared to third party media, unless you’re an influencer or a top brand. Build your housefile to ensure that you can contact your prospects and audience if other options are closed for reasons beyond your control.
  • Encompasses any information your organization creates. This includes website, blog, catalog, email newsletters, magazines, product manuals, employee handbooks and investor relations.

Communications direction:

  • Either one-to-many or one-to-one. They generally go from the media owner to individuals who’ve agreed to receive them, customers, employees, investors and the public.

 

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5 Words That Will Kill Your Blog

UnMarketing

You’ve done the hardest parts of writing a blog post: Gotten the reader to your site, evoked a strong enough emotion to make them feel they need to add to the discussion and leave a comment, and they submit it and see this:

“Your comment is awaiting moderation”

“Your comment is awaiting approval”

“You need to register first”

Congratulations, you’ve just halted the conversation on your post.

For the most part, moderation is used to stop spam from appearing not necessarily to censor comments, but you’re hurting the voice of the very people that can be your biggest evangelists.

There are many issues with this:

  1. When a commenter sees those five words and has to wait for approval, it will stop them from spreading the post until it has been approved
  2. 99% of the time the commenter doesn’t get a notification that the comment has been approved, and so never spreads the original post at all.
  3. The flow of comments is dictated by the blog owners ability to approve comments in a timely fashion.
  4. As soon as a commenter sees that their original comment is awaiting moderation, they will hesitate to comment on anyone else’s comment in the thread.
  5. The commenter doesn’t know if it’s awaiting approval for being a non-spam comment, or that the blog owner is only allowing positive comments.

If the spam issue is your main reason for moderating blog comments, there are a few quick fixes.

  1. Install the Askimet plugin. This well-known, and free for personal use tool is amazing for filtering out spam comments. I average 100+ comments per post, and have only ever had to delete one spam comment that made it past Askimet’s filter.
  2. Use a comment management system like Disqus. That’s the system I use here. It allows threaded comments, meaning I or others can reply in-line to a comment and it makes it linked as a conversation, including emailing the original commenter that someone has replied, so they can return and continue the engagement. It also emails me every time someone comments, and I can reply on my Blackberry in the email, and it will post it as a comment. Not to mention if a spam comment slips through (or a troll) I just reply to the email with “delete” and it’s gone instantly.

There are some valid reasons to moderate comments, such as very sensitive topic-based sites (especially religion, politics, parents against Justin Bieber) and also large corporate blogs that have certain topics that bring out the “special” folks of the world.

But for the most part I see moderation being done on the very blogs that need comments: the ones that don’t have many at all. Especially when you’re starting out, let the conversation flow. Create community and engagement. The comments on my posts are 10X better than my original post. Why would I want to stifle that?

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5 habits of effective data-driven organizations

Venture Beat

Want to master the CMO role? Join us for GrowthBeat Summit on June 1-2 in Boston, where we’ll discuss how to merge creativity with technology to drive growth. Space is limited and we’re limiting attendance to CMOs and top marketing execs. Request your personal invitation here!


A senior banker – let’s call him Jack — was on a conference call attempting to close out an acquisition. The stakes were high. It was a multibillion-dollar deal and the negotiation of the final price hinged on the measurement of the target’s EBITDA, the Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization. Jack argued that the EBITDA was lower; the opposite party asserted it was higher.

In the middle of the lengthy, convoluted discussion of the numbers, a junior associate realized that, in fact, the other side was right. She passed Jack a note letting him know this. Jack stared at the associate with contempt and proceeded to argue even more vehemently for the lower price. He literally just spoke louder than the other party, cutting them off at every opportunity. And he won. The other side just gave up. In the associate’s words, “I knew Jack was wrong. Jack knew Jack was wrong. The other side knew Jack was wrong, and Jack still won!”

How can we build teams and organizations that don’t succumb to the jerk who just yells more, argues louder? We all want to be data-driven instead of being driven by supposition, ego, and ideology

Over the last two years, I’ve had the opportunity to meet with analysts and leaders inside data-driven organizations as well as many that were not so data driven. Surprisingly, I’ve learned that being data driven has little correlation to size or geography and only a marginal correlation to industry. Data-driven companies range from small health care firms to large banks and even include mid-sized non-profits. And while the traditional categorizations of businesses have little to offer, I’ve observed a few common characteristics:

1. Size doesn’t matter, but variety does. You would think that a data-driven organization has a lot of data, petabytes of data, exabytes of data. In some cases, this is true. But in general, size matters only to a point. For example, I encountered a large technology firm with petabytes of data but only three business analysts. What really matters is the variety of the data. Are people asking questions in different business functions? Are they measuring cost and quality of service, instrumenting marketing campaigns, or observing employee retention by team? Just getting a report at month end on profits? You’re probably not data driven.

2. Everyone has access to some data. Almost no one has access to all of it. There are very few cultures where everyone can see nearly everything. Data breach threats and privacy requirements are top of mind for most data teams. And while these regulations certainly stunt the ability of the company to make data available, most data-driven companies reach a stage where they have developed clear business processes to address these issues.

3. Data is all over the place. One would think that the data is well organized and well maintained — as in a library, where every book is stored in one place. In fact, most data-driven cultures are exactly the opposite. Data is everywhere — on laptops, desktops, servers.

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New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

 New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

Framingham, Mass. – April 10, 2015 – IDG’s CIO—the executive-level IT media brand providing insight into business technology leadership—announces the enhanced focus on emerging technologies in the enterprise at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremonyconference, from mobility to data/analytics, next gen security, cloud, social and other disruptive technologies. This focus aligns with CIOs’ spending plans. According to the CIO Magazine Tech Poll: Economic Outlook, CIOs will increase spending on edge technologies to 45% of their tech budget in the next 1-3 years and 54% of enterprise CIOs anticipate spending more with newer technology vendors in the next year. In order to accommodate this interest and provide access to the new technologies and vendors driving innovation within the enterprise, the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremony, the conference celebrating the innovative use of technology to deliver genuine business value, will add an Emerging Sponsor level.

More than 300 CIOs and technology executives will convene on August 9-11, 2015 in Colorado Springs, CO at the CIO 100 Symposium to hear from peers, industry leaders and technology vendors on innovative ways technology is advancing the enterprise. To expand the scope of this learning, CIO is inviting new technology vendors—defined as established since 2005—to participate in the conference at the Emerging Sponsor level, to share their solutions and expand their visibility with technology purchase decision-makers.

“Technology is the vehicle that will propel enterprises ahead and CIOs want to know what new solutions and services can accelerate this transformation,” said Adam Dennison, senior vice president and publisher, CIO. “The CIO 100 has always focused on innovation and we are excited to roll out this robust partnership portfolio, providing a full scope of potential partners in one place for CIOs to explore.”

To learn more about becoming an Emerging Sponsor at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards, or any sponsorship level, please contact Adam Dennison at adennison@cio.com.

Registration Information
To learn more about the symposium or to register to attend visit www.CIO100.com, call 800.366.0246 or email: executiveprograms@cxo.com.

Current Sponsors
2015 CIO 100 sponsors include underwriting partner VMware and corporate partnersDropbox and Sungard Availability Services.

More Information…

Top Tips On How To Prioritize Big Data

IDG Connect 0811 Top Tips On How To Prioritize Big Data

Nikhil Govindaraj is Vice President of Product at Moxie where he is responsible for all aspects of product management, product design and strategy. Nikhil has more than 15 years of experience in CRM, enterprise collaboration and multi-channel contact centres.

Nikhil shares his tips on how businesses can harness big data to enhance the customer experience.

For many companies, “big data” has become a must-have strategic tool to win more business and outsmart the competition. In particular, consumer retail businesses rely on the data they have collected about their customers to deliver everything from personalised advertising campaigns to new products that precisely target each individual’s interests.

Unfortunately, many companies make the mistake of using big data to solely focus on the “buy” side of the business, but the most successful retailers understand that the overall customer experience is just as important as the sale itself.  These companies leverage big data throughout the customer journey and during every engagement in an effort to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty and, yes, purchases.

These are five key ways your company can harness big data to enhance the customer journey.

1. Deliver the In-Store “Human Touch” Online with Digital Cues

Physical stores have one great advantage: Sales staff and customers engage face-to-face. This gives sales associates the opportunity to “read” customers, using visual data cues to make judgments about how best to approach a customer, such as how long someone has been comparing two products. Armed with this information, sales associates tailor their treatment to customers’ needs to best assist them with purchases. And it works—conversion rates for stores range from 10 percent for apparel to 100 percent for groceries, outpacing Internet conversion rates of just 1-3 percent (Deloitte).

When it comes to online stores, companies have focused on driving prospects to their websites, but then letting them wander around the site without any assistance or guidance. It’s one of the main reasons conversion rates have remained abysmally low. Online brands need to emulate the in-store experience by using digital cues to identify when a customer would benefit from attention to complete a transaction. For example, did the customer get an error message when processing a payment? If so, immediately offer a live chat session with an agent to help the customer solve the problem and complete the purchase.

Read More Tips Here… 

Reuters Is The Latest News Organization To Get Blocked In China

TechCrunch

Reuters has joined Bloomberg, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal in being blocked in China. Reuters itself reported that its website is not reachable in the country as of today.

The organization said it has suffered partial censorship in China in the past, but this time its English and Chinese sites are both affected. That’s verified by data from internet monitoring site Great Fire.

“Reuters is committed to practicing fair and accurate journalism worldwide. We recognize the great importance of news about China to all our customers, and we hope that our sites will be restored in China soon,” Reuters said in a statement.

The reason for the block is not clear. China’s internet censorship organ often blocks new sites and services without warning, but in cases of media it often follows controversial stories. That was the case for past restrictions imposed on The Guardian,New York Times and Bloomberg — each of which published political exposes prior to being blocked. However Reuters hasn’t recently put out stories that obviously raise red flags or cover sensitive topics.

In related news in China, Great Fire itself has been under fire from a strong DDoS attack over the past few days targeting sites that it mirrors in order to avoid censorship. The organization is being served 2.6 billion requests per hour, that’s hoicked the hosting fees up to $30,000 per day, prompting it to go public with a plea for help.

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