Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

iMedia Breakthrough Summit: The Next Wave of Marketing

10/26/2014 - 10/28/2014 Stone Mountain Georgia

DEMO Fall 2014 

11/18/2014 - 11/20/2014 San Jose CA

2015 International CES

01/06/2015 - 01/09/2015 Las Vegas Nevada

digital-media

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Infographic: Everyday Big Data

Vouchercloud

Scientists and businesses often encounter difficulties in analysing huge data sets, otherwise known as “Big Data”. Its size is forever changing across many landscapes, with the amount of data created each day constantly increasing – now four times faster than the world economy. Every day we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data, which is enough to fill 10 million Blu-Ray discs, which in turn is enough to make a stack the size of 4 Eiffel Towers. Big doesn’t seem to be quite ‘big’ enough a word to describe how data is evolving.

The most astonishing thing about Big Data is the speed at which it is increasing. 90% of the world’s data, for example, was created in the last 2 years alone. The number of people with access to the internet today is equal to the world’s entire population in 1960 (3 billion). Global communication has never been easier and it might not come as much of a shock that there are 204 million emails sent per minute. But there are also 216,000 Instagram posts and 217,000 tweets. This is social and business conversation at its best.

The data collected through all these interactions is helping to shape the way we live our lives. As you can see below in the data graphic by vouchercloud it is helping us to save money (comparison websites, reducing energy bills, monitoring our fuel consumption and tailored coupons based on our previous spending habits). It is helping us to get around more efficiently – urban transport is improved using real time data capture and managing traffic hotspots by changing bus routes or traffic light sequences to ease congestion. Even more topical and important, it is helping us to save lives; streaming patient data to recognise outbreaks of illnesses and disease, identifying those at risk and managing the costs of treating patients.

Data is improving and expanding across mobile, digital media and social media, and Big Data is innovating the future ahead of us.

Big Data GRAPHIC1 e1413817382616 Infographic: Everyday Big Data

With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data

The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook built itself into the No. 2 digital advertising platform in the world by analyzing the vast amount of data it had on each of its 1.3 billion users to sell individually targeted ads on its social network.

Now it is going to take those targeted ads to the rest of the Internet, mounting its most direct challenge yet to Google, the leader in digital advertising with nearly one-third of the global market.

On Monday, Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps.

“We are bringing all of the people-based marketing functions that marketers are used to doing on Facebook and allowing them to do that across the web,” David Jakubowski, the company’s head of advertising technology, said in an interview.

Continue reading…

What happens when you combine WhatsApp with YouTube

Digiday

The next frontier for media might just be messaging.

WhatsApp reached 600 million monthly active users in August, six months after Facebook paid $19 billion for the massively popular messaging app. Competitors Line, WeChat and Viber have also experienced impressive growth in recent months.

Montreal-based 5by plans to introduce its own messaging product next week, with one key difference from those aforementioned apps: Its new platform lies at the nexus between messaging and Web video.

“People do not want to broadcast everything on Facebook; they just want to easily send things to people they care about,” 5by CEO Greg Isenberg told Digiday. “We leverage this behavior to make it easier for people to find, share and discuss videos.”

Read on…

Four New IDC MaturityScape Benchmarks to Assist CIOs, IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve Industry Superiority

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 Four New IDC MaturityScape Benchmarks to Assist CIOs, IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve Industry Superiority

New reports explore enterprise architecture, enterprise IT transformation, vendor and sourcing management, and service management

Framingham, MA – October 6, 2014 – International Data Corporation (IDC) today announced four new IDC MaturityScape Benchmark studies, providing organizations a unique opportunity to compare maturity against that of peers with the IDC MaturityScape system of dimensions and sub-dimensions. The four IDC MaturityScape Benchmark studies explore Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT), Vendor and Sourcing Management, and Service Management. These studies build on IDC MaturityScapes, unveiled earlier this year, which provide a structured way for organizations to identify their current level of capability or maturity, and the gap between where they are and where they should be to maintain competitive balance or achieve industry superiority.

  • ClicktoTweet, “@IDC Releases Four New #IDCMaturityScapeBenchmarks to Assist CIOs, #IT and Line of Business Executives to Achieve #IndustrySuperiority”

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise Architecture in the United States

This IDC study presents the results of IDC’s 2014 MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise Architecture Survey, a companion to IDC MaturityScape: Enterprise Architecture (IDC # 247401, March 2014). This pair of studies provides an opportunity for enterprise-class organizations to benchmark themselves against other similarly sized organizations in terms of their enterprise architecture maturity, to uncover maturity gaps among different dimensions, and to plan for improvement. These studies enable CIOs, IT executives, and other senior leaders to optimize decision making from both a business and a technical perspective.

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT)

This IDC study presents the results of IDC’s global 2014 Enterprise IT Transformation MaturityScape Benchmark Survey, and complements IDC MaturityScape: Enterprise IT Transformation (EIT) (IDC # 248141, April 2014). The new study enables organizations to assess their capabilities with regard to 3rd Platform strategy and innovation, to identify maturity gaps among different dimensions and areas of capability that need improvement, and to take actions to achieve the level of maturity that satisfies their business needs.

IDC MaturityScape Benchmark: Vendor and Sourcing Management in the United States

This study presents the results of IDC’s 2014 Vendor and Sourcing Management MaturityScape Benchmark Survey and is a supplement to IDC MaturityScape: Vendor and Sourcing Management — A Framework to Maximize Value and Drive Innovation (IDC # 247458, March 2014). This IDC study provides an opportunity for organizations to benchmark their VSM maturity against the industry standard, assess IT vendor and sourcing management competency and maturity and, most important, prioritize their VSM-related investment decisions.

For the full release, click here

Does it matter that some New York Times editors and writers don’t tweet? Yes and no

Gigaom

BuzzFeed recently ran a post on what it called the New York Times‘ “Twitter graveyard,” which turned out to be a list of accounts set up by the newspaper’s editorial staff that are either dormant or unused, including some that still have the default egg avatar given to Twitter newbies. But does that mean some staffers just haven’t taken to a particular platform, or does it mean the paper’s writers and editors aren’t doing enough to engage with readers?

That was the underlying question behind a discussion I had with a number of senior NYT staffers on Monday — including the paper’s deputy digital editor and co-author of the recent internal “innovation report” — after one (a senior member of the paper’s development team, Jacob Harris) referred to the BuzzFeed piece somewhat dismissively, implying that using Twitter accounts as a proxy for whether journalists are doing their jobs is neither fair nor particularly enlightening (I’ve also created a Storify collection of some of the relevant tweets).

I tried to argue that focusing solely on whether someone is on Twitter is trivial, and may even be unfair, but the larger point being made by BuzzFeed and others is that the Times may be lacking in the area of social engagement with readers. And this is important because it could literally be the key to survival for media companies and journalists alike, as social starts to replace search.

Engaging means more than just listening

A number of Times staffers, including deputy international editor Lydia Polgreen, made the point that there are plenty of reporters and editors who use Twitter regularly and are open to engaging with readers, a group that includes media writerDavid Carr, Polgreen herself, science writer John Schwartz, columnist Nick Kristofand others. As she pointed out, readers have far more engagement potential with NYT writers than they have ever had.

Foreign correspondent Damien Cave and others echoed a common refrain, which is that just because a New York Times reporter or editor doesn’t tweet a lot doesn’t mean that they aren’t listening to readers and following conversations about stories — a point that deputy digital editor Amy O’Leary also made. Others noted that there are lots of different ways to respond to readers and engage with them, including Facebook, email and in person.

As I tried to argue, however, listening is only part of the equation when it comes to engagement, and it’s likely the easiest part. The hard part is having to respond when someone criticizes your piece or points out an error — but that is also when engaging is at its most powerful, and it can ultimately result in better journalism.

Continue reading…

NRS says mobile now most popular way to access websites of Mail Online, Metro and Mirror

Mail Online, Metro and the Mirror all now attract more readers to their websites from mobiles than they do from personal computers.

New evidence of the shift from desktop to mobile news readership is provided in the latest figures from the National Readership Survey, which include mobile for the first time.

The data suggests Mail Online’s mobile raedership in the UK  stands at 10.8m per month, versus 9.6m on personal computers. The NRS claims that the Mirror now attracts 6.2m readers a month on mobile devices, versus 4.9m on PCs, and Metro 3.6m on mobile versus 2.9m on PCs.

The NRS data combines print readership for the year to June 2014 with Comscore website data for June 2014. Both web and print numbers are based on a survey of the general public, rather than actual circulation or information from server logs.

The figures suggest that The Guardian and the Telegraph are neck and neck in terms of UK readership with both achieving a monthly reach of 16.3m. The term ‘reach’ equates to the number of people reading the paper or the website at least once.

The NRS suggests that the Daily Mail/Mail Online is the most read national newspaper brand in the UK with a monthly reach of 23.4m. According to the Mail, this means it now reaches 48.3 per cent of UK adults every month.

Read on…

U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

IDC PMS4colorversion 1  U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., September 16, 2014IDC Government Insights today announced the availability of a new report, Perspective: Looking Up – U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustain Growth Through 2018 (Doc #GI250735). The detailed report, a follow-up to IDC Government Insights’ inaugural cloud spending forecast in July 2013, evaluates how the U.S. Federal Government is spending part of its IT budget on cloud-based solutions. According to the new forecast, cloud spending now represents about 5% of all IT spending by the federal government. IDC Government Insights expects that the growth will continue into FY2015.

  • ClicktoTweet:  IDC U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

For five years, both the U.S. Federal CIO Council and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) have been pushing government agencies to move some types of IT systems to the cloud, particularly new systems, stored data, and mobile solutions. The ongoing level of spending on cloud solutions indicates that this effort is finally having a significant long-term effect. Total cloud spending is going up and the nature of cloud spending itself is changing.

Key highlights from the forecast include:

  • Federal cloud spending for FY2014 will come in higher that originally predicted. A year ago, OMB stated that agencies are slated to spend a little over $2.2 billion on cloud solutions for 2014. By the end of this fiscal year, that number will grow to more than $3.0 billion.
  • As in the previous two years, OMB has predicted a slight pull-back on cloud spending for upcoming FY2015. The current estimate is just under $2.9 billion for next year, however, IDC Government Insights believes that cloud spending will actually increase, not decrease, for FY2015, rising to perhaps to as much as $3.4 billion.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) is passing Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) as the largest type of cloud spending. Last year, OMB estimated that agencies would spend $1.2 billion on IaaS and $724 million on SaaS for FY 2014. This meant that government was different than other industries, since most spend more of their cloud dollars on SaaS. But by the time FY2014 ends on September 30th, the federal government will have spent just $986 million on IaaS, and over $1.3 billion on SaaS.

Read more…

Infographic: Enterprise Mobility in Asia/Pacific

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 Infographic: Enterprise Mobility in Asia/Pacific

Improving employee productivity, business agility and customer experiences are the top three reasons companies are supporting enterprise mobility. However, despite the relatively low increase in cost, IDC sees that more organizations testing mobility management are opting for Mobile Device Management (MDM) solutions rather than more holistic Mobile Enterprise Management (MEM) ones. IDC examines the state of place in Asia/Pacific.

For more IDC infographics, click here

APAC enterprise mobility infographic1 Infographic: Enterprise Mobility in Asia/Pacific