Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

OMMA mCommerce

08/07/2014 New York New York

CIO 100 Symposium & Awards

08/17/2014 - 08/19/2014 Rancho Palos Verdes CA

Mobile Insider Summit

08/17/2014 - 08/20/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

Social Media Insider Summit

08/20/2014 - 08/23/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

iMedia Agency Summit (Malaysia)

08/25/2014 - 08/27/2014 Kota Kinabalu Malaysia

The 6th annual Mobile World

08/28/2014 Seoul

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

advertising-marketing

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

IDG Enterprise’s Editorial Teams Earn 65 ASBPE Awards for Editorial & Design Excellence

 IDG Enterprise’s Editorial Teams Earn 65 ASBPE Awards for Editorial & Design Excellence

IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld— earned 65 editorial and design awards in categories from blog and feature article to online news and original research at the 2014 Azbee awards from the American Society of Business Press Editors (ASBPE). Additionally, NetworkWorld.com received honorable mention for B2B Website of the Year and Computerworld.com was in the Top 10. For the third year, CIO magazine was named one of the Top 10 Magazines of the Year.

“IT leaders are dealing with massive change today – everything from the influx of consumer technologies, to big data and analytics, as well as cloud and mobile. Our editorial teams are documenting how these trends are reshaping business and the IT organization,” said John Gallant, chief content officer, IDG Communications. “We take great pride in our content and design and are thrilled to receive recognition by ASBPE. We strive to help our readers navigate these changes and we look forward to producing award-winning work that helps companies drive results through the use of technology.”

Including this latest recognition from ASBPE, IDG Enterprise brands have won more than 130 editorial awards since 2012. Each brand includes writers, bloggers and designers that produce hundreds of original articles per site each month, setting an exceptional standard for showcasing the transformation of technology in the enterprise.

“Media is undergoing a transformation, and our visitor audience of technology leaders has not only embraced new mediums, but they are leading engagement with our editors through our responsive design based sites and social media,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO of IDG Enterprise. “Being recognized for the innovative use of new channels, in addition to our ongoing stellar reporting and design is very exciting. These recognitions are a great honor and I could not be more pleased to work with such a talented team.”

2014 ASBPE Azbee Award Recap

CIO

Computerworld

ITworld

Network World

About IDG Enterprise
IDG Enterprise, an International Data Group (IDG) company, brings together the leading editorial brands (Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld) to serve the information needs of our technology and security-focused audiences.  As the premier hi-tech B2B media company, we leverage the strengths of our premium owned and operated brands, while simultaneously harnessing their collective reach and audience affinity. We provide market leadership and converged marketing solutions for our customers to engage IT and security decision-makers across our portfolio of award-winning websites, events, magazines, products and services. IDG’s DEMO conferences provide a platform for today’s most innovative and eye-opening technologies to publically launch their solutions.

Company information is available at www.idgenterprise.com
Follow IDG Enterprise on Twitter: @IDGEnterprise
Join IDG Enterprise on LinkedIn

###

Contact:
Lynn Holmlund
Sr. Marketing & PR Manager
IDG Enterprise
lholmlund@idgenterprise.com
Office: 508.935.4526
Mobile: 508.254.8336

The internet of things – the next big challenge to our privacy

The Guardian

If there’s a depressing slogan for the early era of the commercial internet, it’s this: “Privacy is dead – get over it.”

For most of us, the internet is complex and opaque. Some might be vaguely aware that their personal data are getting sucked, their search histories tracked, and their digital journeys scoured.

But the current nature of online services provides few mechanisms for individuals to have oversight and control of their information, particularly across tech-vendors.

An important question is whether privacy will change as we enter the era of pervasive computing. Underpinned by the Internet of Things, pervasive computing is where technology is seamlessly embedded within the real world, intrinsically tied to the physical environment.

If the web is anything to go by, the new hyperconnected world will only make things worse for privacy. Potentially much worse.

More services and more things only mean more data being generated and exchanged. The increase in data volume and complexity might plausibly result in less control. It’s a reasonable assumption, and it leaves privacy in a rather sorry state.

Many of the future predictions about privacy reflect this bleak diagnosis. If privacy isn’t dead yet, then billions-upon-billions of chips, sensors, and wearables will seal the deal.

But before jumping to such conclusions – and bearing in mind the immense power of established tech-vendors and their interest in this space – there may still be reasons to be positive. In particular, the fundamental differences between pervasive computing and Web 2.0 provide a beacon of hope.

One difference is that with pervasive computing, much of the technology becomes tangible and familiar. This makes issues of privacy more readily apparent to users. Web browsing histories stretching back over time are one thing; Google Glass is quite another.

If you can physically witness aspects of data collection, it short-circuits what has traditionally been a long feedback loop between privacy risk and cumulative effect. The hope is that the increased awareness inspires action.

This ties to a second difference: the technology itself could enable action. Unlike the web, where offerings tend to be one-size-fits-all, pervasive computing is driven by the individual, focusing on customised, person-centric services and experiences.

If the technology supporting this properly places individuals in the driving seat, it could also be used to provide individuals with the opportunity to take control of their personal data.

Moving from the abstract web

It has taken years for the sort of awareness and backlash that we’re now starting to see against Facebook, Google, and other major internet vendors that trade in personal data.

This is a product, in many respects, of the inherent obscurity of data collection by web-based services.

Moving from the web to the Internet of Things, many aspects of technology shift from being abstract and hidden, to being grounded in the real world.

Continue reading…

How to prepare for the flood of wearables into the workplace

CITEworld

If there’s a single lesson for enterprise IT professionals to learn from the consumerization, BYOD, and shadow IT trends that have rocked businesses of all shapes and sizes in recent years, it’s that workers will provide their own technology to solve problems if IT can’t or won’t deliver solutions that offer the ease, polish, and efficiency of consumer products.

After decades of being the arbiter of technology in the workplace and presiding over systems that generally grew and improved slowly and steadily, there was a sudden influx of consumer-oriented smartphones connecting to networks orders of magnitude fast than most corporate networks, app stores offering free or low cast apps that are easy to install, and cloud services that linked all of these technologies together. In just a couple of years, the playing field was massively and irrevocably altered and most IT organizations are still struggling to catch up.

For many IT organizations, learning that lesson and incorporating it into practice has been a rocky experience. Ignoring that lesson has often been equally brutal. Many IT leaders that have failed to consider this lesson have seen their influence, budgets, and staffing cut and seen other executives and line of business managers chipping away at their authority and capabilities.

Responding to this challenge has required enterprise developers and IT professionals, who are managing a range under-the-hood infrastructure along with PCs and devices in the hands of users, to develop new skills. That includes some of the so-called soft skills, like the ability to communicate effectively and collaborate with end users to understand their needs and issues and develop solutions that respond to them. It also includes skills that aren’t quite so easy to define, like understanding how to present information on a mobile device; adopting interface design that as easy to use as the best consumer app out there; and considering context as part of system, app, and network design (is someone in the office, at home, connecting by public Wi-Fi?).

Just as enterprise IT has been starting to get a handle on those challenges and become comfortable with those new skills, things are about to change again.

Welcome wearables

Wearables are poised to make a dramatic entrance into our lives and workplaces, if they haven’t already. Wearables pose many of the paradigm shifting challenges that mobile devices, apps, and cloud services did.

The needs of an effective smartwatch app are different from the needs of a smartphone or tablet. There’s no keyboard, screen real estate is very limited for both display or touch input, voice is the most likely candidate for entering data despite the focus on text-based input that has dominated previous phases of computing (including smartphones), and the best smartwatch apps to date are pared down to focus on a single task and execute it as efficiently as possible.

Google Glass and its impending competitors have a completely different set of needs and capabilities. Information needs to be displayed in a way that is as distraction-free as possible, considering that users will be interacting with the real world while using the device in a way that hasn’t been true with smartphones. Interacting with that information will almost certainly be a more more persistent experience than quick glances at a smartwatch or smartphone.

Wearables will also make understanding context more important, both in the apps designed for them and the smartphones paired with them. Context will become more granular, particularly if technologies like iBeacons or other smart devices are part of the equation. It won’t be a matter of understanding the difference between a user being at work or home. It’ll mean understanding if the user is at her desk or in a conference room, what meeting is going on in that conference room and who else is attending, if the meeting is so important that notifications should be disabled, and if she’s speaking or presenting and will immediate access to other data be needed?

Continue reading

Apple will ‘set the world on fire’ with iPhone 6 sales

IDG News Service

Apple will “set the world on fire” with “unbelievably massive” sales of the next iPhone, analysts said this week.

“As well as they did with the iPhone this quarter, with all the rumors of a new iPhone [this fall], I was impressed with the results,” Van Baker of Gartner said about Apple’s second-quarter earnings released on Tuesday. “That tells me when the next generation comes out, they’re going to set the world on fire.”

On July 22, Apple reported it sold 35.2 million iPhones in the second quarter, a 13% increase over the same period the year before. The number was under Wall Street’s expectations of 35.8 million, but still surprising to some, Baker included, because sales have tended to droop in the quarter prior to the debut of new models.

Virtually everyone expects Apple to unveil at least one new iPhone, possibly several, in September and the following months, if only because of a rising tide of component leaks from sieve-like Asian suppliers. That smartphone, dubbed “iPhone 6″ by outsiders in lieu of any formal acknowledgement by Apple, will reportedly boast a larger 4.7-in. screen, with an even-bigger second model sporting a 5.5-in. display possible at the same time, or more likely, later this year or early in 2015.

Pent-up demand for a larger screen from Apple will trigger a buying spree, analysts have predicted. Smartphones with bigger displays are increasing their share of the total market, and are especially important in countries like China, where they serve as both phone and tablet substitute. Apple boosted the size of the iPhone’s display from 3.5-in. to 4-in. with 2012′s iPhone 5, but contrary to some expectations, used the same-sized screen for last year’s iPhone 5S and 5C.

And China, as Apple CEO Tim Cook has repeatedly said, is the company’s best growth opportunity.

“But there’s a lot of pent-up demand among developed economies for a bigger iPhone, too,” Baker contended. “I think [the iPhone 6] is poised to do extremely well.”

Other long-time Apple watchers were on board, too. “I am extremely bullish about the iPhone 6,” said Ben Thompson, an independent analyst who covers the technology field from his Stratechery website. “It’s going to be unbelievably massive.”

Apple seems to be expecting the same: In the second quarter, it committed a near-record $21 billion to third-party manufacturers for components and equipment as they presumably geared up for a string of new product announcements this fall.

Those commitments, as Apple has regularly laid out in its quarterly filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, are pre-payments for outsourced manufacturing and the components those companies use to assemble products. As of the end of June, Apple had $15.4 billion in such commitments.

Also off the balance sheet was an additional $5.6 billion in obligations, mostly for acquiring manufacturing and tooling equipment put in place by Apple’s component makers and product assemblers.

Click to continue reading

Millennials: Mexico’s Digital Trendsetters

eMarketer

Consumers who were born after the year 2000—many of them the children of millennials—are likely to be even more digital than their predecessors. But they have yet to come of age and are a few years from becoming viable consumers. For now, millennials are by far the most digital generation in Mexico. They are also the most populous group, totaling approximately 40.5 million, or nearly 34% of the population in Mexico in 2014, according to data from government agencies Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (INEGI) and Consejo Nacional de Población (CONAPO).

174922 Millennials: Mexicos Digital Trendsetters

Acknowledging the importance of this massive group of consumers approaching maturity, we recently broadcast our first-ever eMarketer webinar in Spanish, focusing on Mexico’s millennials. But there is more information than meets the eye. According to comScore Media Metrix, the 15.6 million millennial internet users (ages 15 to 34) made up 52.0% of Mexico’s online population in March 2014. By contrast, children between 6 and 14 represented 15.1% of internet users, and their share dropped as the complexity of digital activities grew (for example, percentage of social media users or visitors to retail sites). It is worth noting, however, that this measurement includes only home and work locations and excludes mobile internet traffic—a category dominated by millennials—as well as public computers.

Within the internet, there is social. And in that category, millennials once again were ahead of the curve. comScore found that there were 15.4 million 15-to-34-year-old unique visitors to social media properties in March 2014, representing 55.6% of social networkers in Mexico.

What social media properties were these young consumers using? As predictable as it may be, the answer was Facebook, which had 13.2 million unique millennial visitors in Mexico in March 2014, representing 85.7% of 15-to-34-year-old social networkers. But don’t hold your breath waiting for anything usual to follow suit in that list. ShareThis and Taringa! rounded out the top three social properties among millennials. LinkedIn, Twitter and Google+ came in fourth, sixth and eighth place, respectively.

Millennials also represented 54.8% of digital video viewers and 56.1% of retail site visitors in Mexico. Among the 15-to-34 age group, properties that sold tangible goods fared well. Fully 1.6 million millennials accessed retail sites that sold computer hardware, and 1.1 million visited sites where they could buy books. The top 10 retail site categories were rounded out by apparel (900,000 unique visitors), consumer electronics (900,000), sports and outdoor equipment (700,000) and department stores (600,000).

Click to see more

Email: The Old Kid on the Block’s Still Got It

eMarketer

Email’s not dead. In fact, Q2 2014 research by Gigaom found that 86% of US digital marketers used email marketing regularly—the highest response rate out of all programs listed.

176718 Email: The Old Kid on the Blocks Still Got It

On top of that, the June 2014 report detailing the survey results, underwritten by Extole, called email “the digital marketing workhorse,” meaning it was effective—and often considered the single most effective—for reaching all goals, including awareness (41% of respondents), acquisition (37%), conversion (42%) and retention (56%).

When it came to that last objective—customer retention—email dominated other programs, leading second-place social network marketing by nearly 20 percentage points.

Due to these positive results, one-quarter of respondents planned to increase spending on email marketing. This was the third-highest response, trailing social network marketing (38%) and content marketing (28%). Meanwhile, few marketers said they would up investments in newer digital formats such as mobile advertising (16%) and digital video ads (14%).

Based on April 2014 polling My.com, a chunk of those dollars would be well spent on mobile-optimized email. Nearly three-quarters of US internet users studied said they checked email on a mobile device. Android-powered devices were the most popular mobile platforms for checking email via mobile, cited by 48% of respondents, followed by iOS, with 38%.

Click to see more

Ready or Not, the Internet of Things Is Coming

eMarketer

Think the net neutrality debate is all about streaming videos? Think again. It’s actually much more than that: It’s about streaming your life. Internet connectivity might seem ubiquitous today, between the use of PCs, mobile devices, and smart TVs, but there are major swaths of daily life that aren’t connected yet that soon will become so, such as homes and cars, according to a new eMarketer report, “Key Digital Trends for Midyear 2014: The Internet of Things, Net Neutrality, and Why Marketers Need to Care.”

176056 Ready or Not, the Internet of Things Is Coming

Connecting all the unconnected devices, machines and systems will involve vast numbers of new internet-enabled objects and large sums of money. In a relatively untapped market with seemingly limitless potential, forecasts tend toward the sky-high:

  • International Data Corporation predicts the worldwide market for “internet of things” (IoT) solutions will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020.
  • MarketsandMarkets gives the IoT market a more conservative—but still lofty—valuation of $1.029 trillion in 2013, increasing to $1.423 trillion by 2020.
  • Gartner forecasts 26 billion connected objects worldwide by 2020 (a figure that does not include PCs, smartphones and tablets).
  • IDATE projects 80 billion internet-connected things in 2020, up from 15 billion in 2012. This figure does include PCs, TVs and smart devices, but the vast majority (85%) will be objects like car tires or shipping pallets that may communicate with the web via an intermediate device. Devices that communicate directly, such as PCs, TVs and mobile phones, will make up 11% of the total in 2020.
  • Cisco Systems predicts 50 billion things will be connected by 2022, yielding $19 trillion in new revenues ($14.4 trillion of which will accrue to private-sector corporations).

“There’s no doubt the world is moving toward a more connected future, but the speed with which consumers and enterprises make the transition to the internet of things is still to be determined,” said Noah Elkin, executive editor at eMarketer. “The timing of adoption will determine just how much money and how many things are involved.”

If you can’t check in, is it really Foursquare?

IDG News Service

Foursquare unceremoniously dropped its “check in” feature this week.

Now, the service has been re-created as a third-rate Yelp instead of a first-rate Foursquare. Check-ins are now done via Swarm, a new app launched recently by Foursquare.

The trouble with this is that, for many of Foursquare’s most loyal and passionate users, checking in to locations is what Foursquare has always been about.

This kind of late-stage pivoting is something of an unhappy trend. I believe the cause of these strategic errors by companies is a combination of taking longtime and passionate users for granted while simultaneously coveting thy neighbor’s business model.

That’s a risky strategy. A company that goes that route could fail to succeed with the new model and also fail to hang on to its most passionate users. Then it could be acquired by Yahoo, never to be heard from again.

Twitter trouble

The poster child for this kind of error is Twitter.

People who love Twitter fell in love with it when it was a hyper-minimalist, quirky, secret-code-controlled text-centric microblog. It was minimalism that made Twitter great.

But Twitter got a bad case of Google andFacebook envy. The company redesigned its spare minimalism to look almost exactly like cluttered Facebook. The CEO of a company called Berg illustrated this perfectly by putting his Twitter and Facebook profiles side by side. The redesign is part of a larger direction for Twitter streams to move from text-based to picture-based. Twitter is joining Google+ and Facebook in the arms race that has broken out as people use images, rather than words, to compete for attention.

Twitter also embraced the card interface, which Google has rolled out to multiple properties, from Google+ to Android Wear.

Twitter has recently been testing a feature called “retweet with comment,” which gathers up the original tweet in a card and essentially attaches it to the retweet. This moves Twitter away from its core idea, which is forced brevity.

Of course, new features can fail their tests and may never be rolled out. But the nature of Twitter tests suggests that the company is making the dual mistakes of taking its core user base for granted and simultaneously flirting with the business models of competitors.

For example, Twitter tested a feature that causes a link to a movie trailer to automatically appear when a user types in a hashtag for that movie.

Twitter is even considering dropping both the @ symbol, for identifying and linking to specific user accounts, and the hashtag, for linking to specific kinds of content, according to some testing it has done.

Over time, Twitter is evolving from something that people loved to something that is just like other services and has has few differentiating features.

Continue reading

Mobile gadgets outnumber people in these 7 countries

IDG News Service

Wireless broadband subscriptions now outnumber people in seven countries as consumers continue to snap up smartphones and tablets, according to a new report.

Finland, Australia, Japan, Sweden, Denmark, South Korea and the U.S. had wireless broadband penetration of more than 100 percent as of December 2013, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Tuesday. That means there was more than one wireless broadband subscription per person, usually because consumers have more than one mobile device that can go online. The U.S. just barely crossed the bar, while Finland led the group with more than 123 percent penetration.

Across all 37 OECD countries, wireless broadband penetration rose to 72.4 percent as total subscriptions grew 14.6 percent. The group spans North America, Australia, New Zealand, and much of Europe, as well as Japan, South Korea, Turkey, Israel, Mexico and Chile. It’s sometimes treated as a barometer of the developed world.

Wired broadband subscriptions also grew in 2013, reaching an average of 27 percent penetration. That means there was just over one wired subscription per four people: Wired broadband services, such as cable and DSL (digital subscriber line), typically are shared. Switzerland led in that category with 44.9 percent penetration, followed by the Netherlands and Denmark. The U.S. had just under 30 wired subscriptions per 100 people, while Turkey came in last with just over 11.

DSL still makes up a majority of wired broadband subscriptions, at 51.5 percent, followed by cable with 31.2 percent. Fiber-optic grew to a 16.7 percent share, gradually replacing DSL services. Fiber more than doubled its share of the market in the U.K. and also gained strongly in Spain, Turkey and France. While those countries still have relatively low fiber penetration, Japan and Korea continued to lead the OECD for that technology. Nearly 70 percent of all wired broadband in Japan goes over fiber, and almost 65 percent in Korea.

The OECD has compiled some of its broadband statistics on a portal page. For all the technologies it tracks, the group uses a generous definition of broadband as a service capable of at least 256K bits per second downstream.

Apple gets patent for 3-year-old smartwatch design labeled ‘iTime’

IDG News Service

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office served up further evidence on Tuesday that Apple is designing a smartwatch when it awarded the company a patent for a wrist-worn gadget with a touchscreen and ability to communicate with a smartphone.

“The invention pertains to an electronic wristwatch,” wrote Apple in the filing for U.S. Patent 8,787,006, which was submitted in July 2011 but made public on Tuesday.

The patent doesn’t give much away about any commercial product that might be planned by Apple, but it does provide an insight into the way the company was thinking in 2011.

It describes “an electronic wristband to be worn on a wrist of a user” that has a receptacle for a “mobile electronic device.” That mobile device is a small display module that can be clipped into the wristband when needed.

The display portion is a mobile device in its own right and functions while not clipped into the wristband. Once connected together, the wristband and mobile device form a smartwatch that can communicate with a second device such as a phone, tablet PC or desktop computer. the patent said.

The wristband might include haptic sensors that allow for control with gestures “with one’s arm or wrist.”

“For example, the gesture might be a horizontal movement for one user input option (e.g., decline incoming call), and might be a vertical movement for another user input option (e.g., accept incoming call). For example, the gesture might be a single shake (or bounce, tap, etc.) of the user’s wrist for one user input option (e.g., accept incoming call), and might be a pair of shakes (or bounces, taps, etc.) for another user input option (e.g., decline incoming call),” the filing reads

In some of the drawings that make up the patent, the watch device is labeled “iTime,” although that name isn’t claimed as a trademark with the USPTO.

“Portable electronic devices are commonplace today,” Apple wrote in the document. “In some cases these portable electronic devices can be carried by a user with relative ease, placed in a pocket of user’s clothing, or clipped onto the user or the user’s clothing. Some portable electronic devices are small enough to be worn by a user.”

“Additionally, accessories have been utilized to provide additional functionality to portable electronic devices,” it said. “There are, however, continuing needs to make portable electronic devices smaller and more portable. There is also a continuing need to enhance functionalities of portable electronic devices.”

While Apple hasn’t publically acknowledged it is working on a smartwatch, a number of leaks from the company have suggested one is under development.

Click to see more