Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo – Washington

12/03/2014 Washington D.C.

Email Insider Summit

12/07/2014 - 12/10/2014 TBA

Search Insider Summit

12/10/2014 - 12/13/2014 Deer Valley UT

innovation-overview

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC envisions 2015 will be a year of accelerating innovation on the 3rd Platform

Jaideep Mehta, Managing Director, IDC South Asia says, “It has been about two years since organizations started to explore the benefits 3rd Platform technologies could unlock for them. 2015 is finally expected to be a year of widespread adoption of the 3rd Platform – Social, Mobile, Cloud and Big Data. IDC expects the businesses to move from a saturated 2nd Platform to a now thriving 3rd Platform era. Recovering markets, growing capabilities and innovating leaders will act as catalyst during this transition phase making 2015 a significantly positive year for the India IT eco-system.”

IDC revised IT spending growth in the Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) (APeJ) region down from 8.7% to 5.8% in 2014 followed by a very modest increase to 6.0% in 2015. IT spending growth for the rest of the 2014-2018 forecast period is expected to climb upwards to 6.4% in 2017.

IDC expects the APeJ region to remain a most reliable engine for growth with multinational companies (MNCs) and Asian enterprises alike continuing to relentlessly look to Asia for future opportunities.

More insights will be revealed in a forthcoming report, “IDC Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) ICT 2015 Top 10 Predictions”.

Drawing from the latest IDC research and internal brainstorming sessions amongst IDC’s regional and country analysts, the following are the top 10 key ICT predictions in 2015 that IDC believes will have the biggest commercial impact on the APeJ ICT market.

1) US$15 billion of government funding in 2015 will turn ICT plans into battlefields innovators

In 2015, IDC expects government ICT investments to be focused on the consolidation and streamlining of scarce ICT resources, the attainment of better management tools for effective decision making, and cyber-security.

In the next two to three years, IDC expects several regional authorities to utilize new sourcing models for transformational ICT, such as 3rd Platform technologies (i.e. cloud, Big Data/ analytics, mobility and social), continued Smart City programs, connected smart machines and intelligent sensors (i.e. edge computing), and the Internet of Things (IoT).

2) 60% of enterprises in 2015 will structure IT into core vs Lines of Business (LoB) IT

In 2015, IDC predicts that 60% of enterprises will structure their IT departments into two functional groups: Core IT and a separate LoB IT function. For larger organizations, these groups will become physically distinct entities, but for most Asia/Pacific enterprises this separation will be logical, as the two kinds of roles will be distinctly different but the reporting structure may not differ.

3) The software-defined battle lines will get defined in 2015

The hybrid cloud, or federated datacenter, is still the current architecture of choice for organizations trying to align their IT infrastructure to the demands of the business.

Looking ahead to 2015 and based on the IDC Asia/Pacific Transformative Infrastructure (TI) Index, between 20-25% of all organizations will already have adopted Software-Defined Networking (SDN), Software-Defined Storage (SDS), or Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) to deliver on their hybrid cloud architecture (such as automation, showback and service catalog capabilities) across the region.

4) The agile development team will be in high demand in 2015 with growth in DevOps adoptions

IDC’s IT Services Survey found that 45% of businesses are undergoing or planning to undergo application modernization projects. Their ability to scale up 3rd Platform adoption will require changes to IT operation that bring agility and overcome siloed legacy systems. This need for speed will bring the first big wave of DevOps adoption in the region and will make agile development the de facto norm.

Continue reading… 

Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents say

PCworld

Internet companies have run amok with our personal data, and people aren’t entirely sure what to do about it, judging from the results of a new survey.

More than 90 percent of Americans feel they’ve lost control over how their personal information is collected and used by companies, particularly for advertising purposes, according to the results of a survey by the Pew Research Center, published Wednesday.

Eighty percent expressed concern over how third parties like advertisers accessed the data they share on social media sites. Pew did not gather the names of which sites specifically respondents meant, but you could likely venture a guess.

The survey, which polled 607 adults online, was the Washington, D.C.-based think tank’s first in a series to tackle Americans’ views toward surveilance 100042486 medium Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents sayprivacy after the leaks around government surveillance made by Edward Snowden last year.

The majority of respondents did indeed say that people should be concerned about whether the government is listening in on their phone calls, or viewing their online communications and other sensitive data.

But beyond government surveillance, the findings also reflect people’s attitudes amid the increasing sophistication by which Internet companies leverage people’s data for advertising.

“It’s a bundle of concerns,” said Lee Rainie, one of Pew’s lead researchers on the project, in an interview. “It’s partly surveillance, it’s partly tracking, and this generalized sense that I’m losing control of my identity and my data,” he said.

The constant flood of stories related to data breaches, whether it’s at Target, Snapchat, or P.F. Chang’s, don’t help either.

But voicing concern about the level of access companies, governments and other groups have to data is one thing; taking action in response is another.

Some respondents said they have taken actions to protect their privacy, like using a pseudonym, but a majority of respondents agreed that achieving anonymity online is not possible.

People’s concerns around privacy might be part of the trade-off in using a free service. Some 55 percent of respondents said they were willing to share “some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free.”

Continue reading… 

Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

IDG Connect 0811 Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

Something very special happened at last month’s Dreamforce conference in San Francisco. Will.i.am, one of the world’s biggest pop stars, launched his new smartband wearable device, the i.am.PULS – and the worlds of music, fashion, technology, mainstream and enterprise culture well and truly collided.

“I’m an ideas guy,” he said, and it’s true that will.i.am has been extremely busy in recent years investing in game-changing technologies as well as producing award-winning music. A true innovator, he contributed to the massive success of Beats headphones and developed the concept behind Ekocycle, Coca-Cola’s sustainable living brand.

This is a man whose vision of the future, as he explained on-stage with Marc Benioff earlier this year, has been influenced heavily by the pace of innovation in technology. Echoing Facebook’s mantra that technology’s evolutionary journey is only “1% finished,” will.i.am argued that the tech landscape will be “unrecognisable” in ten years’ time: “The thing on your wrist that talks to a phone…is not the future, it’s a starting point.”

The next revolution in connected devices

Shipments of wearables are projected to reach almost 112 million units in 2018, up from less than 20 million this year (IDC). As wearables proliferate, they will add to a vast universe of interconnected, smart devices. And when the inevitable take-off of wearables does arrive, the opportunities for brands will reach a new stratosphere as they look to own the customer journey.

Wearables are set to provide marketers with the purest view of the customer yet, in terms of the volume and immediacy of the data gathered. The rise of mobile and social prompted talk of always-on marketing, and the proliferation of wearables will further enable marketers to deliver the right message to the right user at the right time. Even better, because wearables are, by nature, deeply integrated into a daily lifestyle, marketers have an opportunity to learn more about their users than ever before.

Imagine what this could mean for your brand. How might you exploit this massive opportunity to improve customer service and make marketing messages more relevant?

Data, data, data

The key to cracking wearable tech for marketing lies in – you guessed it – data. If Mark Zuckerberg’s law (the rate of increase for social sharing) is accurate, in 10 years there will be more pieces of content shared every day (95 billion) than we currently share each month (89 billion).

Of course, as marketers we’ve been talking for a few years now about the importance of data in digital marketing. The challenge comes in tracking, filtering and measuring this data so that you have a true single view of the customer. The need to effectively leverage your customer data – including social data – is only going to increase as the number of consumer devices increases, and as wearables move into mainstream adoption. This will be crucial to providing the deeper levels of personalisation that customers now expect.

 

Continue reading… 

Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

 Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

The 2014 IDG Enterprise Cloud Computing infographic highlights research on today’s cloud computing trends that technology decision-makers are faced with.

Learn more about the study and view sample slides here: http://bit.ly/idgecloud2014

IDG Enterprise’s 2014 Cloud Computing Survey was conducted across more than 1,600 IT and security decision-makers at a variety of industries that visit IDG Enterprise brands (CIO, Computerworld, CSO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World), IDG UK brands (CIO, Computerworld, Techworld), or IDG Sweden brands (CIO, Cloud Magazine, Computer, IDG, InternetWorld, TechWorld).

246109036 IDG Enterprise Cloud Computing Infographic 2014 copy Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

IDG Corporate Video 2015

idg logo1 IDG Corporate Video 2015

IDG is the world’s leading media, events, and research company reaching over 280 million technology buyings in 97 countries.

IDG Communications (a subsidiary of IDG) is the largest global technology media, data and services company. It delivers personalized and contextual-based experiences for the most powerful tech buyers.

From millennial tech enthusiasts to senior executives, IDG understands and reaches them all.

2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

U.S. organizations are still losing the cyberwar to hackers according to the 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime survey, recently conducted by CSO, PwC, the U.S. Secret Service, and the CERT Division of Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.

The U.S. State of Cybercrime infographic illustrates the results from this survey as well as the continuing upheaval organizations face combatting cybercrime and the effects it is having and will continue to have on U.S. organizations.

For more information on the study, click here

cybercrime copy 2014 U.S. State of Cybercrime Infographic

Salesforce Takes On Tableau, Oracle In Analytics

Investors.com

Analyze this: Salesforce.com is challenging Tableau Software, Oracle and others for a piece of the fast-growing, multibillion-dollar data analytics software market.

Salesforce.com plans to launch its first major data analytics software service on Monday. The enterprise software company intends to compete with rivals that already offer software to help companies analyze large amounts of data through easy-to-read charts and graphs.

A pioneer in software-as-a-service delivered via the Internet cloud, Salesforce.com is the No. 1 maker of customer relationship management (CRM) software, which helps companies deal with customers and partners. CRM is a key segment of the business software market, but Salesforce is moving into other areas to boost revenue.

Its latest move is another step in becoming a one-stop shop for all of a company’s business software needs, says Anna Rosenman, director of Salesforce.com’s analytics cloud.

“This is one of the biggest announcements we have made in years,” Rosenman told IBD. “We are entering an entirely new market.”

Salesforce has, on a small scale, already offered some data analytics software. The new service, called Wave, will help companies pull a wide swath of data from a variety of sources so it can be chopped up and best used by a company, Rosenman says.

Infographic: Everyday Big Data

Vouchercloud

Scientists and businesses often encounter difficulties in analysing huge data sets, otherwise known as “Big Data”. Its size is forever changing across many landscapes, with the amount of data created each day constantly increasing – now four times faster than the world economy. Every day we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data, which is enough to fill 10 million Blu-Ray discs, which in turn is enough to make a stack the size of 4 Eiffel Towers. Big doesn’t seem to be quite ‘big’ enough a word to describe how data is evolving.

The most astonishing thing about Big Data is the speed at which it is increasing. 90% of the world’s data, for example, was created in the last 2 years alone. The number of people with access to the internet today is equal to the world’s entire population in 1960 (3 billion). Global communication has never been easier and it might not come as much of a shock that there are 204 million emails sent per minute. But there are also 216,000 Instagram posts and 217,000 tweets. This is social and business conversation at its best.

The data collected through all these interactions is helping to shape the way we live our lives. As you can see below in the data graphic by vouchercloud it is helping us to save money (comparison websites, reducing energy bills, monitoring our fuel consumption and tailored coupons based on our previous spending habits). It is helping us to get around more efficiently – urban transport is improved using real time data capture and managing traffic hotspots by changing bus routes or traffic light sequences to ease congestion. Even more topical and important, it is helping us to save lives; streaming patient data to recognise outbreaks of illnesses and disease, identifying those at risk and managing the costs of treating patients.

Data is improving and expanding across mobile, digital media and social media, and Big Data is innovating the future ahead of us.

Big Data GRAPHIC1 e1413817382616 Infographic: Everyday Big Data

With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data

The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook built itself into the No. 2 digital advertising platform in the world by analyzing the vast amount of data it had on each of its 1.3 billion users to sell individually targeted ads on its social network.

Now it is going to take those targeted ads to the rest of the Internet, mounting its most direct challenge yet to Google, the leader in digital advertising with nearly one-third of the global market.

On Monday, Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps.

“We are bringing all of the people-based marketing functions that marketers are used to doing on Facebook and allowing them to do that across the web,” David Jakubowski, the company’s head of advertising technology, said in an interview.

Continue reading…

3 mistaken assumptions about what Big Data can do for you

CITEworld

Big data is certainly all the rage. The Wall Street Journal recently ran a piece ondata scientists commanding up to $300,000 per year with very little experience. Clearly the era of embracing big data is here.

However, since the tools and best practices in this area are so novel, it’s important to revisit our assumptions about what big data can do for us – and, perhaps more importantly, what it can’t do. Here are three commonly held yetmistaken assumptions about what big data can do for you and your business.

Big Data Can’t Predict the Future

Big data – and all of its analysis tools, commentary, science experiments and visualizations – can’t tell you what will happen in the future. Why? The data you collect comes entirely from the past. We’ve yet to reach the point at which we can collect data points and values from the future.

We can analyze what happened in the past and try to draw trends between actions and decision points and their consequences, based on the data, and we might use that to guess that under similar circumstances, if a similar decision were made, similar outcomes would occur as a result. But we can’t predict the future.

Many executives and organizations attempt to glean the future out of a mass of data. This is a bad idea, because the future is always changing. You know how financial advisers always use the line, “Past performance does not guarantee future results?” This maxim applies to big data as well.

Instead of trying to predict the future, use big data to optimize and enhance what’s currently true. Look at something that’s happening now and constructively improve upon the outcomes for that current event. Use the data to find the right questions to ask. Don’t try to use big data as a crystal ball.

Big Data Can’t Replace Your Values – or Your Company’s

Big data is a poor substitute for values – those mores and standards by which you live your life and your company endeavors to operate. Your choices on substantive issues may be more crystallized, and it may be easier and clearer to sort out the advantages and disadvantages of various courses of action, but the data itself can’t help you interpret how certain decisions stack up against the standards you set for yourself and for your company.

Data can paint all sorts of pictures, both in the numbers themselves and through the aid of visualization software. Your staff can create many projected scenarios about any given issue, but those results are simply that – a projection. Your job as an executive, and as a CIO making these sorts of tools and staff available within your business, is to actually reconcile that data against your company’s values.

For instance, imagine you’re a car manufacturer. Your big data sources and tools tell you that certain vehicle models have a flaw that may cost a few cents to repair on vehicles yet to be manufactured, but would cost significantly more to repair in vehicles that have already been purchased by customers and are in production use. The data, and thus your data scientists on staff, might recommend fixing the issue on cars still on the assembly line but not bothering to fix the cars already out there in the world, simply because the data might have shown the cost exceeded the likelihood of damages across the board.

(Note that this scenario may sound familiar to you if you have been following theGeneral Motors ignition switch saga. However, this is only a hypothetical example, and further, there is no evidence big data played into the GM recall.)

Say your company has a value statement that quality is job 1 and safety is of paramount importance. Though the data suggests a recall isn’t worth it, you make the call as an executive to start the recall. You’re informed, but you’re not controlled by big data.

Above all, it’s vital to remember that sometimes the right answer appears to be the wrong one when viewed through a different lens. Make sure you use the right lens.

Read more…