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Your Best Marketing Data Provider May Be Right Underneath Your Nose

Integrate

By  Scott Vaughan

Data is today’s marketing currency. We harvest it wherever we can – via paid, owned and earned media. And this harvesting is facilitated by numerous tech and services providers: known-data appending plug-ins like Dun & Bradstreet and Social123; anonymous data marketplaces such as (Oracle) BlueKai; and currently the hottest of the data sources, predictive analytics providers such as Lattice Engines and 6Sense.

But what’s almost always neglected in the marketing data discourse: the media companies that have been generating traffic, prospects and customers for marketing clients for years.

Marketers shouldn’t neglect these sources and their evolving capabilities. Top-tier media companies aren’t the “lead-gen sources” of old – they’re the “data-gen providers” of tomorrow.

We’re slowly seeing B2B media companies evolve. They’re leveraging new technologies and long-held expertise to grow into sophisticated data repositories for their clients. This is great news for marketers.

The optimism stems from the wealth of data types available today – big, small, prospect, intent, behavior and account intelligence. And, it appears more is on the way.

Having spent a chunk of my career working within a B2B media company, and now both partnering with and serving these organizations as customers, I can say the definition of “media company” is clearly changing.  This includes traditional web and print publishers, digital lead-generation providers, and advertising technology companies offering solutions to better deliver audience and leads.

These shifts are part survival and part opportunity. It’s survival in that media companies are shedding expensive print and eyeball-generating web operations. And opportunity in that they’re emerging as data-source experts to serve marketers’ seemingly endless appetite for highly specific customer and prospect information.

Behind closed doors, media executives are debating and plotting to answer one question: “What’s the core business we’ll be in a year from now?”  The consensus – DATA marketing solutions.

To make this a reality, media executives are NOT JUST thinking about traffic, impressions or lead generation. Progressive, next-generation media organizations are investing to deliver high-quality prospect and performance (e.g., content performance) data to their marketing customers. All this to arm marketers with intelligent prospect info and marketing intelligence to put their marketing technology systems and content to work – to create new customers.

Data as the New Media AND Marketing Currency

B2B media executives are still in the thick of it, but they also understand “monetizing traffic” or trying to squeeze “every ounce out of their databases” isn’t a long-term success formula. Rather, new-era media companies realize that data is the invaluable asset they can provide to their paying marketing customers.

Data that informs how and with what to capture prospect interest. Media companies use this data in concert with both their own content and their customers’ marketing assets.

Just as importantly, they wield data about their visitors, subscribers, and attendees, that can be packaged and made actionable for marketers’ demand generation and customer acquisition efforts.

Let’s dive deeper into a few types of emerging data sets that are becoming the lifeblood for progressive media companies to better serve their customers. We’ll discuss what BOTH media companies and the marketers they serve can do about it.

Behavioral Prospect Data to Signal Intent

Based on a user’s behaviors, media companies have a unique grasp on what buyers or targeted companies may be interested in. Using data science, this intent-based data can be collected and shared about an individual’s online activities. Most importantly, specific areas of content interest can also be gathered, which often signals research around an upcoming purchase. The media company can also provide precise, additional targeting by serving ads or emailing offers, for example.

Marketers use this data to score leads based on specific activity and increased interactions. They can also prioritize and fast track the best opportunities immediately by nurturing prospects in a more targeted program or sending to sales for immediate follow-up.

A few examples in this area: TechTarget’s Activity Intelligence platform and Bombora (formerly Madison Logic Data) are media companies providing this type of service today.

Company Content Consumption Data for Account-Based Marketing

Account-Based Marketing is all the rage today, and for good reason. The focus is on the ability to identify and target specific companies that B2B marketers and sales chiefs have earmarked as ideal prospects for their product or service.

Media companies use digital tactics, demand generation, and data solutions to help marketers identify purchasing intent with a specific list of target companies. Using company IP addresses and domain intelligence, for example, they can share this activity data when target companies (“accounts”) are viewing or engaging with their content and retarget them immediately with additional information and offers.

Demandbase and IDG Communications – among many others – provide advanced offerings in this area, leading with their data.

The media company transformation to “data-gen providers” is still in its early stages. They’re just starting to team up with marketers to use data science for advanced targeting and sophisticated data generation. So, what can marketers do to tap into the wealth of prospect and customer data intelligence?

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‘Context not programmatic volumes key to curbing ineffective mobile ads’ says gaming publisher

Source: The Drum

Contextual targeting not programmatic-driven volumes are key to premiumising mobile media amid the flurry of ineffective ads being “blindly bought” through ad networks, claims gaming publisher Gameloft.

It is why the business opened its ad inventory direct to marketers four months ago and why it has recently started talking to them like a media owner rather than a publisher. Simply put, this shift means it no longer peddles a performance-based model based on cost-per acquisition, and instead stresses the ability to drive brand-led metrics now that it sells its own media.

It is a risky and somewhat old-fashioned approach at a time when publishers are opting to sell through networks or programmatically in an attempt to maximise their ad yield.

However, this means brands are more likely to buy blind from publishers, claimed Gameloft’s UK and Ireland country manager David Whitby. Instead, the company combines user data from either Facebook Connect or Google Play with data from its games to create what Whitby said is a “fairly good profile” with which it can sell.

To get brands onside, it is introducing a flurry of formats, from videos that play between levels to branded in-game events in the hope of giving its native media a different slant versus what’s on offer from other publishers. And while the ads are proving effective, with its videos getting upwards of 65 per cent for completed views, there is still a massive job to become an influential player in the mobile space.

“Every planner you talk to says mobile is a nightmare because they don’t know where their booked ads are running. If you didn’t know what TV ad slots you’d bought it would seem ridiculous but on mobile its considered acceptable right now for some reason,” said Whitby.

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CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

acer logo e1435248713675 CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

Program ran in United Kingdom

GOAL

Educate and inspire gift-givers about the benefits of computing products in enhancing the lives of their loved ones while increasing awareness of Acer brand & products. Screen Shot 2015 06 25 at 12.03.33 PM CASE STUDY: Audience Extension

SOLUTION

Leverage the reach & influence of premium IDG editorial media outlets to deploy a dual-function program aimed at engaging target consumer audiences on two levels:

NativeNews Package  (Hub, Articles, Videos, Article Spotlight, Sponsored Article Posts & Newsletters):

Built platforms aimed at engaging target audiences, providing extensive brand exposure and communicating Acer’s messaging. Custom articles and video scripts were authored by IDG subject-matter experts and were hosted on IDG properties. Custom ad units ran in tandem with the native activities to promote content and reinforce brand recognition.

Custom Built Ad Units (Mobile & Desktop Product Line Showcase & InFunnel Ad Units):

This was an interactive solution utilized to create awareness, provide information and ultimately drive consideration and sales.

RESULTS

  • High average time spent on site (3:54mins) and a high overall average video completion rate (73%).
  • 38% of all video views were on the IDG-produced videos.
  • Impressions: 1,352,434 ; Page views: 6,682

Why Marketers are Betting Big on Predictive Analytics

IDG Connect 0811 Why Marketers are Betting Big on Predictive Analytics

Give a marketer a sale, and you’ll keep his company afloat for a day; teach him to predict future sales, and you may just ensure his longevity.

That, in essence, is the premise behind predictive marketing, a concept that’s increasingly taking hold in enterprises today.

Tapping into the analytics trend that’s being felt throughout the business world as a whole, predictive marketing applies algorithms and machine learning to big data to help marketers direct their efforts in the most profitable directions. Predictive-analytics tools can help marketers gauge ahead of time what a particular customer will buy, for example, as well as when and how much. Equipped with that information, companies can tailor their campaigns accordingly.

Amazon is a shining example: Its recommendations engine reportedly accounts for roughly 30 percent of the company’s sales.

Successes like that may help explain investors’ excitement about predictive-analytics purveyors such as Lattice Engines.

Lattice on Wednesday announced a fresh US$28 million in Series D funding, bringing its total investment intake so far to $75 million. The company’s software is now used in more than 100 organizations worldwide, it says, resulting in higher sales rates, conversions and cross-sales successes as well as reduced churn.

Predictive analytics can help marketers across the entire customer lifecycle, said Fern Halper, director of TDWI Research for advanced analytics.

For instance, “predictive analytics helps in segmenting customers, finding patterns in their behavior, offering them the promotions that they would be likely to respond to, and predicting what customers would likely churn,” Halper explained.

Marketing and sales are, in fact, among the top areas that organizations start with when deploying predictive analytics, she added, as increasingly easy-to-use tools bring such capabilities within closer reach for nonexpert business users.

Also fueling the technology’s growth is the sheer deluge of data out there today.

“There’s so much data and so many channels that firms like Lattice are now necessary to help marketers interpret and understand and, to some degree, optimize their campaigns in real time,” said Greg Sterling, vice president for strategy and insights with the Local Search Association. “Firms and tools that offer ways to make sense of all the data are increasingly important.”

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From Proxies to People: Why Third-Party Data Isn’t Enough

Source: DIGIday

Written by Vijay Balan, head of client services, LiveRail.

Imagine a world in which advertisers can seamlessly serve data-driven ads to the right user at the right time across channels and devices. Publishers, partnering with third-party data partners, layer extra data over their unique viewer profiles and get a clear look at who their audiences actually are, allowing their advertisers to get the targeted results of their dreams.

Now wake up. Look around. Is that how it really works? We didn’t think so.

But this enticing fairytale is being shared profusely amongst both marketers and publishers, propagating the notion that many industry players have what they call “people-based marketing” figured out. At the core of this misconception is a simple myth: that third-party data is comprehensive and representative of real people.

Multiple channels, multiple complications

Media consumption behavior has changed. Today, 25 percent of people switch between three or more devices daily. The ability to deliver relevant, targeted ads to them across those touch points just got three or more times harder (Source: GFK). Another wrench tossed into the works? A sizable 40 percent of people begin browsing on one device only to finish their transaction on another, making purchase attribution and campaign performance a nightmare to measure (Source: GFK).

In light of this, evaluating a publisher has become more than determining the quality of the inventory. Advertisers now want to know what data sources their partners have access to, and it’s the quality of that data and the ability to connect the dots across all inventory and make the right ad decision that affects their final judgment. Because of this, publishers now face the challenge of piecing their inventory together, applying data from third parties where they can, and matching it as best they can to their advertisers’ targeting needs at a very high cost.

If you give a user a cookie…

But this “accuracy” is only a mirage. It’s easy for data companies to patch together what they call a “man,” “woman,” or some other desired segment based on nothing more than inferred information and sell it to the highest bidder. When advertisers double-check this targeting via measurement companies, their campaigns fall short, largely due to the modern approach (or lack thereof) to cross-screen attribution.

Today, most identity matching relies on cookies, despite research that shows cookie-based campaigns to be only 60 percent accurate (Nielsen). Identifying a person across multiple devices and attributing in-store purchases to online brand campaigns is just not possible for the marketers who default to this method.

Why? Third-party data partners use cookies to capture information about a “person” from a single encounter rather than assessing their collective behavior over time. They base their identification on inferred attributes (from age to gender and beyond) rather than declared registration or profile data. Worst of all, these assumptions are made based on a small data set. Scale is key here: If the sample is too small, using it to target a larger audience of online users is inaccurate and unreliable. With an error rate of 40 percent (Nielsen), a publisher cannot afford to lose revenue or pass on the cost to advertisers.

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Report: Mobile Ads Drove 80 Percent Increase In Store Visits Within 24 Hours

Source: Marketing Land

Between smartphones and tablets, mobile devices now play a larger role in product and brand discovery than laptops. According to a new “Mobile Audience Insights Report” from NinthDecimal 54 percent of consumers in 2014 “shopped on a mobile device over a laptop before making a purchase” and 34 percent “preferred to use a smartphone over a tablet or laptop.”

In the context of the waves of data coming out, these findings, which are a mix of behavioral and survey data, shouldn’t surprise anyone. However it remains the case that mobile marketing efforts (and budgets) still don’t reflect the reality of consumer behavior in the market.

In terms of cross-device shopping and buying, NinthDecimal found that the share of mobile commerce purchases grew at the expense of in-store buying, while the PC share remained flat. One interesting thing to understand, not published in the report, would be the location of these mobile buys (was there a pattern? did they occur at home, in stores, elsewhere?).

Screen Shot 2015 06 08 at 8.09.12 AM 800x411 Report: Mobile Ads Drove 80 Percent Increase In Store Visits Within 24 Hours

In addition, NinthDecimal found that in-store visits increased 80 percent within 24 hours of mobile ad exposure and stayed above average store-visitation benchmarks for the following six days. We don’t know much about the specific ad creative generating these visits. It appears however that they’re mostly offer-based ads (see bottom chart below).

One of the most interesting sets of findings in the report involves an analysis of ad performance in relation to store proximity. Here it appears performance is measured by CTR, which is a questionable mobile metric for ultimate performance. Nonetheless it can be a directional indicator of intent.

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Video Will Dominate Mobile Usage by 2020

Source: MediaPost

The number of smartphones in use around the world will more than double over the next five years, from 2.6 billion in 2014 to 6.1 billion in 2020, according to a new forecast from network equipment manufacturer Ericsson. That means around 70% of the world’s population will have a smartphone by the latter date, with the bulk of  new mobile subscriptions (two billion) located in the Asia-Pacific region, and another 750 million in the Middle East and Africa.

Meanwhile the total number of connected devices of all kinds, including wearable devices, will soar to 26 billion worldwide over the same period. Mobile handset subscriptions of all kinds (including non-smartphones) will increase from 7.1 billion in 2014 to 9.2 billion in 2020.

Ericsson also predicts that by 2020, 90% of the world population will have access to mobile broadband networks, causing mobile data usage to soar. Worldwide smartphone data usage will increase fivefold, from one gigabyte per month in 2014 to 4.9 gigabytes in 2020, when smartphones will account for 80% of all global mobile data usage. Overall two out of three dollars spent on Internet services will go to mobile access rather than landline services five years from now.

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DATA DRIVEN AND DIGITALLY SAVVY: THE RISE OF THE NEW MARKETING ORGANIZATION

Source: Forbes Insights

For marketers, the digitization of business has opened up a new world. No longer are they forced to launch campaigns while blindly relying on gut instinct and hoping for the best. Marketing and advertising campaigns that succeed do so by integrating a range of intelligent approaches to identify customers, segment, measure results, analyze data and build upon feedback in real time.

In today’s global economy, there is a great urgency to be able to conduct data-driven marketing campaigns, as organizations are under pressure as never before to deliver results. “Data-driven marketing” is the practice of employing data to achieve marketing goals and measure results, through engaging customers and delivering greater value to the business. This builds upon a number of forces, such as increasingly digitized operations and increasingly demanding and digitally connected customers.

Data insights have long played a role in efforts to drive business growth and reach new and existing customers. Insights generated by customer and transaction data have helped answer the four w’s of marketing—who, when, where and what, says Dr. Ravi Dhar, professor of management and marketing, and director of the Center for Customer Insights at the Yale School of Management. “It’s always been about who buys it, when did they buy it, where did they buy it, and what did they buy.” The challenge is now to answer the fifth “w” question—why. To correlate data to the “why,” information needs to be brought together from across the enterprise and market landscape to be transformed into actionable insights. “This is really critical to making good decisions, but the data can’t tell you the ‘why’ by itself. You need good managerial understanding to be able to answer the ‘why.’”

Data-driven marketing opens up a wealth of new perspectives and opportunities for businesses, and ultimately, it’s all about customers. A successful data-driven effort needs to be accompanied by efforts to listen to and engage with customers. Datadriven marketing is customer-centric marketing.

Businesses are only just starting to understand the power and potential of data-driven marketing. Ultimately, a data-driven organization learns to employ data analytics as part of all marketing campaigns, from conception to post-campaign review. Within a data-driven enterprise, information can move freely and is consistent across all channels. Within organizations that have achieved high levels of customer intelligence, there is a data-centric culture that is supported from the top down, and decision makers at all levels are provided training and support in mastering the power of data to better reach their markets.

“There’s really very little excuse in today’s marketing department to not use data,” says Russell Glass, head of B2B product for LinkedIn, and coauthor of The Big Data-Driven Business (Wiley). “With the cost of processing, storage and tools having gone down so much, if you’re not using data to make your decisions, or at least to inform your decisions, you’re probably not doing your job.”

Check out the full PDF…

New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

Screen Shot 2015 05 26 at 2.20.01 PM New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

19 May 2015

Spending projections include 25 use cases to provide insight on immediate opportunities for IoT technologies

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., May 19, 2015 – The worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) market is expected to grow 19% in 2015, led by digital signage, according to a new forecast from International Data Corporation (IDC). The second annual forecast focuses on growing IoT use in 11 vertical industries, including consumer, retail, healthcare, government, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, while also sizing IoT opportunities for 25 vertical-specific use cases.

Unlike any other research in the industry, the new forecast specifically highlights worldwide spending across IoT use cases, including smart appliances, automated public transit, remote health monitoring, digital signage, connected vehicles, and air traffic monitoring, among others. The comprehensive spending model was designed to help vendors clearly understand the industry-specific opportunity for IoT technologies today.

  • ClicktoTweet,  @IDC Asserts Worldwide #InternetofThings Market to grow 19% in 2015, led by #Digitalsignage

Other key findings from the new forecast include:

  • The IoT market in manufacturing operations will grow from $42.2 billion in 2013 to $98.8 billion in 2018, a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.6%. Growth will be driven by ongoing efforts to increase efficiency and link islands of automation.
  • Digital signage use in retail outlets will grow from $6.0 billion in 2013 to $27.5 billion in 2018, a 35.7% five-year CAGR, as retailers continue to digitize the consumer experience.
  • The hottest US market is in connected vehicles, with 34.8% year-over-year growth anticipated in 2015.

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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

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