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IDC’s 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

By, Kathleen Schaub

What does IDC predict for tech CMOs and their teams in 2015 and beyond?

Sunrise%2B1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

Our recent report IDC FutureScape: Worldwide CMO / Customer Experience 2015 Predictionshighlights insight and perspective on long-term industry trends along with new themes that may be on the horizon. Here’s a summary.

1: 25% of High-Tech CMOs Will Be Replaced Every Year Through 2018
There are two dominant drivers behind the increased CMO turnover over the past two years. One driver centers on the cycle of new product innovations, new companies, and new CMO jobs. The second (but equal) driver centers around the required “fit” for a new CMO in the today’s tumultuous environment and the short supply of CMOs with transformational skill sets.

Guidance: Everyone in the C-Suite needs to “get” modern marketing to make the CMO successful.

2: By 2017, 25% of Marketing Organizations Will Solve Critical Skill Gaps by Deploying Centers of Excellence
The speed of marketing transformation and the increased expectations on marketing have left every marketing organization in need of updating its skill sets. In the coming years, CMOs will not only have to recruit and train talent but also create organizational structures that amplify and share best practices. Leading marketing organizations will become masters of the centers of excellence (CoE).

Guidance: Get out of your traditional silos and collaborate.

3: By 2017, 15% of B2B Companies Will Use More Than 20 Data Sources to Personalize a High-Value Customer Journey
Personalization requires a lot of data. CMOs do not suffer from a lack of data — quite the contrary. Today’s marketer has dozens, if not hundreds, of sources available. However, companies lack the time, expertise, and financial and technical resources to collect data, secure it, integrate it, deliver it, and dig through it to create actionable insights. This situation is poised for dramatic change.

Guidance: One of your new mantras must be – “do it for the data”.

4: By 2018, One in Three Marketing Organizations Will Deliver Compelling Content to All Stages of the Buyer’s Journey
CMOs reported to IDC that “building out content marketing as an organizational competency” was their #2 priority (ROI was #1). Content marketing is what companies must do when self-sufficient buyers won’t talk to sales people. While it’s easy to do content marketing; it’s hard to do content marketing well. The most progressive marketing organizations leverage marketing technology and data to develop a buyer-centric content strategy.

Guidance: Remember that it’s the buyer’s journey – not your journey for the buyer.

5: In 2015, Only One in Five Companies Will Retool to Reach LOB Buyers and Outperform Those Selling Exclusively to IT
IDC research shows that line-of-business (LOB) buyers control an average of 61% of the total IT spend. LOB buyers are harder to market to and are even more self-sufficient than technical buyers. To succeed with this new buyer, tech CMOs must move more quickly to digital, incorporate social, broaden the types of content, and enable the sales team to maximize their limited time in front of the customer.

Guidance: Worry less about how much video is in your plan and worry more about your message.

6: By 2016, 50% of Large High-Tech Marketing Organizations Will Create In-House Agencies
Advertising agencies have been slow to recognize the pervasive nature of digital. While many digital agencies exist and many have been acquired by the global holding companies, these interactive services typically managed as just another part of the portfolio of services the agency offers. Modern marketing practitioners realize that digital is now in the DNA of everything they do and are ahead of their agencies.

Guidance: Don’t wait. Take the lead.

Continue reading… 

 

IDG TechNetwork Expands Programmatic Media Buying Into China

MediaPost

The IDG TechNetwork has expanded its global online advertising network into China, following its parent company International Data Group (IDG), which has supported the market for 34 years.

The launch of IDG TechNetwork China, announced Monday, means that IDG now supports data-driven marketing and premium programmatic buying to more than 60 Chinese language magazines, newspapers and Web sites.

Peter Longo, CEO of U.S. Media for IDG Communications, believes the move makes the company the first global technology-focused ad network to enter the Chinese market. The network supports more than 570 publisher sites and reaches more than 130 million tech enthusiasts, enterprise tech buyers and gamers.

Based in Beijing, IDG TechNetwork China is a fully owned business unit of IDG China led by CEO William Xu.

For brands, the move means an easier transition into China to reach the local market and better access to premium inventory they can purchase and optimize through one media group, the IDG TechNetwork China.

Marketers will have access to auctions and private marketplaces, data management platform and demand side platform services, along with increased targeting capabilities and multiple ways of acquiring inventory through direct placements and exchange based trading, per Longo.

“They will be able to buy with confidence against premium inventory from IDG, a media company that has been doing business in China for over 30 years,” he said.

All owned-and-operated Web sites in China become part of the IDG TechNetwork China along with selected premium partners that we have chosen to work with us. This provides increased scale to offer their advertising partners, as well as the ability to do business with new partners, such as DSPs and agency trading desks.

The company will now collect first-party data for its network of Web sites, allowing for better performance and return on investments for advertisers.

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Top Tips: Creating Effective Personalised Marketing Campaigns

IDG Connect 0811 Top Tips: Creating Effective Personalised Marketing Campaigns

04 12 2014 creating effective personalised marketing campaigns Top Tips: Creating Effective Personalised Marketing Campaigns


Julie Hesselgrove is group president, Communication and Marketing Services at
Xerox. Julie has over 30 years’ experience and in that time has seen industries evolve and adapt to meet changing customer demands. Today, she believes that the biggest challenge facing organisations across Europe is their communications infrastructure. Julie’s passion for innovation and improvement is put to good use in her current role – leading and developing a team with considerable market experience – to deliver solutions that will help our clients overcome their biggest marketing challenges. 

Julie shares her top tips on creating effective personalised marketing campaigns.

 

As consumers we are bombarded with marketing messages every waking hour. Our commutes, our choice of shop, the TV we watch, the devices we use; everything is a marketing channel.

As a result we are increasingly adept at ‘tuning out’ marketing noise. It’s an act of self-preservation. Which means capturing our attention and cutting through the noise relies almost entirely on being engaging and personally relevant.

On the whole, consumers are spending more in the UK. Which means that the opportunity for returns from personalised marketing is real. Creating satisfied customers equates to improved conversion, increased retention and higher customer spend. In other words, a win-win.

To create a truly personalised campaign, as ever, the devil is in the detail. But the good news is that personalisation is now more achievable to marketers than ever, thanks to new abilities to track, measure and respond to consumer interactions in real time, while deploying data analytics to get a real understanding of traction. Here are five steps towards giving your communications that personal touch.

1.       Live in the now
In the age of the ‘always on’ customer, the expectation is that every web page, mobile or tablet interaction, and piece of printed communication will acknowledge the customer’s real-time preferences. As a consequence, the focus is on real time interaction management – creating content in ’the now’ that responds to the customer’s current actions – not just historic preferences.

Using data analytics will help you move from being descriptive (based on past transactions) to being contextualised and predictive (based on what’s happening now). But also consider creating pre-written content to push out when your customer’s circumstances change to build a more intuitive personalisation that responds to the customer as if in a conversation.

2.       Think digital
One of the biggest challenges for many businesses is embracing the digital business model and changing cultural norms within the organisation. We still see companies that are too comfortable with monolithic, legacy systems that are difficult to update. Moving to more agile, customer-centric platforms creates an ecosystem where the business does not have to own all parts of the system.

3.       Outsource the process
More and more large organisations are turning to third-party experts to handle the huge amounts of data that they now need to act upon. Through outsourcing they are able to make short-term gains by reducing costs, replacing platforms and helping a business unit solve problems. For the customer this translates to a more seamless and agile communications experience.

Continue reading… 

Customer-Focused Teams Are Secretly Daunted By Data Demands

IDG Connect 08111 Customer Focused Teams Are Secretly Daunted By Data Demands

One of the top goals for business leaders today is to better understand, engage with and retain their customers[i]. This involves making the most of the ever-growing volume of customer data available to build integrated, three-dimensional profiles of customers and to identify patterns and trends. Many firms turn to the roles closest to the customer to deliver this insight.

Recent research undertaken with PwC[ii] reveals that nearly two-thirds of European and just under half of North American mid-market firms believe their marketing teams have the best skills to extract insight from information, and around half (46% and 57% respectively) say the same for their customer service and insight teams.

Yet conversations with marketing leaders reveal that the teams in question are far less confident about their ability to achieve this.

One study[iii] found that a third of executives believe that being able to use data analytics to extract predictive findings from big data is the top skill required of their marketing professionals. However, just under half admit their own team lacks this skill. Another[iv] discovered that an overwhelming 82% of marketing leaders feel unprepared to deal with the data explosion, and only 59% say they have the skills to analyse and understand customer behaviour across all channels.

Despite this clearly recognised skills gap, only one in five marketing professionals is expected to receive formal training in data analysis this year[v].

In short, many firms could be passing data to teams that are ill-equipped to do it justice. Missing out on rich customer insight is just one of the risks. Our research found that marketing teams are increasingly given free access to sensitive and confidential customer information in order to extract intelligence, but are rarely held accountable for keeping it safe.

We discovered that less than one per cent of mid-market firms think teams such as marketing and customer insight should have a responsibility for information protection. Many (39%) place this responsibility firmly at the door of the IT security manager.

This is all the more worrying when you consider the fact that marketing departments are often at the forefront of flexible working practices[vi], allowing staff to work from home or while travelling – often without providing adequate guidance and support.

We found that one in three marketing professionals works from home two-to-four days a week, more than most other job roles. A third undertake confidential or sensitive work while travelling on public transport; one in four throw documents into insecure bins away from the office – and 48% send or receive work documents over a personal email account, at times using an insecure wireless network (12%). However, just a third of the employers surveyed provide secure remote intranet access for marketing professionals working from home, or offer guidelines or policies on how to handle sensitive information.

Continue reading… 

IDC Reveals Worldwide Internet of Things Predictions for 2015

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDC Reveals Worldwide Internet of Things Predictions for 2015

Within the next five years, more than 90% of all IoT data will be hosted on service provider platforms as cloud computing reduces the complexity of supporting IoT “Data Blending”

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., December 3, 2014 – International Data Corporation (IDC) today hosted the IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Internet of Things 2015 Predictions Web conference. The presentation provided organizations with insight and perspective on long-term industry trends along with new themes that may be on the horizon. The Predictions Web conference series and accompanying IDC FutureScape reports are designed to help company leaders capitalize on emerging market opportunities and plan for future growth. An audio replay of today’s Web conference will be available this afternoon. To access the replay, please visit: http://bit.ly/IDCioTFutureScape2015.

  • ClicktoTweet:  @IDC Reveals #Worldwideinternetofthings #Predictions2015 – Register for the webcast replay here http://bit.ly/IDCioTFutureScape2015

The predictions from the IDC FutureScape for Internet of Things are:

  1. IoT and the Cloud. Within the next five years, more than 90% of all IoT data will be hosted on service provider platforms as cloud computing reduces the complexity of supporting IoT “Data Blending”.
  2. IoT and security. Within two years, 90% of all IT networks will have an IoT-based security breach, although many will be considered “inconveniences.” Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) will be forced to adopt new IoT policies.
  3. IoT at the edge. By 2018, 40% of IoT-created data will be stored, processed, analyzed, and acted upon close to, or at the edge, of the network.
  4. IoT and network capacity. Within three years, 50% of IT networks will transition from having excess capacity to handle the additional IoT devices to being network constrained with nearly 10% of sites being overwhelmed.
  5. IoT and non-traditional infrastructure. By 2017, 90% of datacenter and enterprise systems management will rapidly adopt new business models to manage non-traditional infrastructure and BYOD device categories.
  6. IoT and vertical diversification. Today, over 50% of IoT activity is centered in manufacturing, transportation, smart city, and consumer applications, but within five years all industries will have rolled out IoT initiatives.
  7. IoT and the Smart City. Competing to build innovative and sustainable smart cities, local government will represent more than 25% of all government external spending to deploy, manage, and realize the business value of the IoT by 2018.
  8. IoT and embedded systems. By 2018, 60% of IT solutions originally developed as proprietary, closed-industry solutions will become open-sourced allowing a rush of vertical-driven IoT markets to form.
  9. IoT and wearables. Within five years, 40% of wearables will have evolved into a viable consumer mass market alternative to smartphones.
  10. IoT and millennials. By 2018, 16% of the population will be Millennials and will be accelerating IoT adoption due to their reality of living in a connected world.

“The Internet of Things will give IT managers a lot to think about,” said Vernon Turner, Senior Vice President of Research. “Enterprises will have to address every IT discipline to effectively balance the deluge of data from devices that are connected to the corporate network. In addition, IoT will drive tough organizational structure changes in companies to allow innovation to be transparent to everyone, while creating new competitive business models and products.”

The IDC FutureScape report that this Web conference is based on will be published and available within the next 24 hours. To learn more about IDC Predictions and IDC FutureScapes, please visit:www.idc.com/Predictions2015.

For additional information about these predictions or to arrange a one-on-one briefing, please contact Sarah Murray at 781-378-2674 or sarah@attunecommunications.com. Reports are available to qualified members of the media. For information on purchasing reports, contact insights@idc.com; reporters should email sarah@attunecommunications.com.

Read the original release… 

 

Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC envisions 2015 will be a year of accelerating innovation on the 3rd Platform

Jaideep Mehta, Managing Director, IDC South Asia says, “It has been about two years since organizations started to explore the benefits 3rd Platform technologies could unlock for them. 2015 is finally expected to be a year of widespread adoption of the 3rd Platform – Social, Mobile, Cloud and Big Data. IDC expects the businesses to move from a saturated 2nd Platform to a now thriving 3rd Platform era. Recovering markets, growing capabilities and innovating leaders will act as catalyst during this transition phase making 2015 a significantly positive year for the India IT eco-system.”

IDC revised IT spending growth in the Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) (APeJ) region down from 8.7% to 5.8% in 2014 followed by a very modest increase to 6.0% in 2015. IT spending growth for the rest of the 2014-2018 forecast period is expected to climb upwards to 6.4% in 2017.

IDC expects the APeJ region to remain a most reliable engine for growth with multinational companies (MNCs) and Asian enterprises alike continuing to relentlessly look to Asia for future opportunities.

More insights will be revealed in a forthcoming report, “IDC Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) ICT 2015 Top 10 Predictions”.

Drawing from the latest IDC research and internal brainstorming sessions amongst IDC’s regional and country analysts, the following are the top 10 key ICT predictions in 2015 that IDC believes will have the biggest commercial impact on the APeJ ICT market.

1) US$15 billion of government funding in 2015 will turn ICT plans into battlefields innovators

In 2015, IDC expects government ICT investments to be focused on the consolidation and streamlining of scarce ICT resources, the attainment of better management tools for effective decision making, and cyber-security.

In the next two to three years, IDC expects several regional authorities to utilize new sourcing models for transformational ICT, such as 3rd Platform technologies (i.e. cloud, Big Data/ analytics, mobility and social), continued Smart City programs, connected smart machines and intelligent sensors (i.e. edge computing), and the Internet of Things (IoT).

2) 60% of enterprises in 2015 will structure IT into core vs Lines of Business (LoB) IT

In 2015, IDC predicts that 60% of enterprises will structure their IT departments into two functional groups: Core IT and a separate LoB IT function. For larger organizations, these groups will become physically distinct entities, but for most Asia/Pacific enterprises this separation will be logical, as the two kinds of roles will be distinctly different but the reporting structure may not differ.

3) The software-defined battle lines will get defined in 2015

The hybrid cloud, or federated datacenter, is still the current architecture of choice for organizations trying to align their IT infrastructure to the demands of the business.

Looking ahead to 2015 and based on the IDC Asia/Pacific Transformative Infrastructure (TI) Index, between 20-25% of all organizations will already have adopted Software-Defined Networking (SDN), Software-Defined Storage (SDS), or Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) to deliver on their hybrid cloud architecture (such as automation, showback and service catalog capabilities) across the region.

4) The agile development team will be in high demand in 2015 with growth in DevOps adoptions

IDC’s IT Services Survey found that 45% of businesses are undergoing or planning to undergo application modernization projects. Their ability to scale up 3rd Platform adoption will require changes to IT operation that bring agility and overcome siloed legacy systems. This need for speed will bring the first big wave of DevOps adoption in the region and will make agile development the de facto norm.

Continue reading… 

Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents say

PCworld

Internet companies have run amok with our personal data, and people aren’t entirely sure what to do about it, judging from the results of a new survey.

More than 90 percent of Americans feel they’ve lost control over how their personal information is collected and used by companies, particularly for advertising purposes, according to the results of a survey by the Pew Research Center, published Wednesday.

Eighty percent expressed concern over how third parties like advertisers accessed the data they share on social media sites. Pew did not gather the names of which sites specifically respondents meant, but you could likely venture a guess.

The survey, which polled 607 adults online, was the Washington, D.C.-based think tank’s first in a series to tackle Americans’ views toward surveilance 100042486 medium Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents sayprivacy after the leaks around government surveillance made by Edward Snowden last year.

The majority of respondents did indeed say that people should be concerned about whether the government is listening in on their phone calls, or viewing their online communications and other sensitive data.

But beyond government surveillance, the findings also reflect people’s attitudes amid the increasing sophistication by which Internet companies leverage people’s data for advertising.

“It’s a bundle of concerns,” said Lee Rainie, one of Pew’s lead researchers on the project, in an interview. “It’s partly surveillance, it’s partly tracking, and this generalized sense that I’m losing control of my identity and my data,” he said.

The constant flood of stories related to data breaches, whether it’s at Target, Snapchat, or P.F. Chang’s, don’t help either.

But voicing concern about the level of access companies, governments and other groups have to data is one thing; taking action in response is another.

Some respondents said they have taken actions to protect their privacy, like using a pseudonym, but a majority of respondents agreed that achieving anonymity online is not possible.

People’s concerns around privacy might be part of the trade-off in using a free service. Some 55 percent of respondents said they were willing to share “some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free.”

Continue reading… 

Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

IDG Connect 0811 Wearables: When Technology & Popular Culture Collide

Something very special happened at last month’s Dreamforce conference in San Francisco. Will.i.am, one of the world’s biggest pop stars, launched his new smartband wearable device, the i.am.PULS – and the worlds of music, fashion, technology, mainstream and enterprise culture well and truly collided.

“I’m an ideas guy,” he said, and it’s true that will.i.am has been extremely busy in recent years investing in game-changing technologies as well as producing award-winning music. A true innovator, he contributed to the massive success of Beats headphones and developed the concept behind Ekocycle, Coca-Cola’s sustainable living brand.

This is a man whose vision of the future, as he explained on-stage with Marc Benioff earlier this year, has been influenced heavily by the pace of innovation in technology. Echoing Facebook’s mantra that technology’s evolutionary journey is only “1% finished,” will.i.am argued that the tech landscape will be “unrecognisable” in ten years’ time: “The thing on your wrist that talks to a phone…is not the future, it’s a starting point.”

The next revolution in connected devices

Shipments of wearables are projected to reach almost 112 million units in 2018, up from less than 20 million this year (IDC). As wearables proliferate, they will add to a vast universe of interconnected, smart devices. And when the inevitable take-off of wearables does arrive, the opportunities for brands will reach a new stratosphere as they look to own the customer journey.

Wearables are set to provide marketers with the purest view of the customer yet, in terms of the volume and immediacy of the data gathered. The rise of mobile and social prompted talk of always-on marketing, and the proliferation of wearables will further enable marketers to deliver the right message to the right user at the right time. Even better, because wearables are, by nature, deeply integrated into a daily lifestyle, marketers have an opportunity to learn more about their users than ever before.

Imagine what this could mean for your brand. How might you exploit this massive opportunity to improve customer service and make marketing messages more relevant?

Data, data, data

The key to cracking wearable tech for marketing lies in – you guessed it – data. If Mark Zuckerberg’s law (the rate of increase for social sharing) is accurate, in 10 years there will be more pieces of content shared every day (95 billion) than we currently share each month (89 billion).

Of course, as marketers we’ve been talking for a few years now about the importance of data in digital marketing. The challenge comes in tracking, filtering and measuring this data so that you have a true single view of the customer. The need to effectively leverage your customer data – including social data – is only going to increase as the number of consumer devices increases, and as wearables move into mainstream adoption. This will be crucial to providing the deeper levels of personalisation that customers now expect.

 

Continue reading… 

Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

 Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

The 2014 IDG Enterprise Cloud Computing infographic highlights research on today’s cloud computing trends that technology decision-makers are faced with.

Learn more about the study and view sample slides here: http://bit.ly/idgecloud2014

IDG Enterprise’s 2014 Cloud Computing Survey was conducted across more than 1,600 IT and security decision-makers at a variety of industries that visit IDG Enterprise brands (CIO, Computerworld, CSO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World), IDG UK brands (CIO, Computerworld, Techworld), or IDG Sweden brands (CIO, Cloud Magazine, Computer, IDG, InternetWorld, TechWorld).

246109036 IDG Enterprise Cloud Computing Infographic 2014 copy Infographic: Cloud Computing Adoption and Opportunities in the Enterprise

IDG Corporate Video 2015

idg logo1 IDG Corporate Video 2015

IDG is the world’s leading media, events, and research company reaching over 280 million technology buyings in 97 countries.

IDG Communications (a subsidiary of IDG) is the largest global technology media, data and services company. It delivers personalized and contextual-based experiences for the most powerful tech buyers.

From millennial tech enthusiasts to senior executives, IDG understands and reaches them all.