Upcoming Events
No Events

digital-media

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

IDC: Serial Analysis of “Internet Plus” and Transformation of Traditional Industry – Media Industry is Experiencing Disruptive Transformation

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDC: Serial Analysis of “Internet Plus” and Transformation of Traditional Industry – Media Industry is Experiencing Disruptive Transformation

Beijing, March 25, 2015 – In the recent two years, IDC visited more than 30 traditional enterprises and industry clusters proceeding from the emerging mode of Internet such as e-commerce, and obtained a deep insight into the impact of Internet on traditional industry transformation and upgrade. Yolanda Zhang, Research Manager of IDC China believes that, “in the Two Sessions (the National Peoples’ Congress and Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference), Internet Plus is among the hottest vocabularies. The State for the first time encourages and supports the development of Internet as a strategic emerging industry. It can be foreseen that Internet will play a significant role in promoting industry upgrade and leading the new economic development of the whole country.”

In the upgrading process of traditional industries, advertising and media is the first industry impacted by the wave of Internet. In recent years, with the value of Internet media increasingly accepted by the market, the proportion of spending on Internet advertising has expanded steadily.

IDC analysts believe that, the impact of “Internet Plus” on the transformation and upgrading of media advertising is mainly reflected in the following four aspects:

1. Expand media resources and increase media forms: The development of Internet applications, for instance in e-commerce, has expanded the channel resources of traditional media communications. New media platforms are formed such as Web portals, e-commerce platforms, APP clients, and social media platforms, which are able to provide advertisements in the form of page ads, implanted ads, and ad search alliance.

2. Deliver ads more precisely: The traditional advertising models seek to improve  brand awareness by delivering ads on mass media platforms such as China Central Television (CCTV) and leveraging the maximum range of “bombardment”, so as to foster consumer trust and boost sales revenue growth. Advertising models based on E-commerce ecosystem tend to first filter out potential target customers through accurate analysis of user data, and then deliver ads to the targeted customers. Compared to traditional advertising models, they are more accurate and cost effective.

Continue Reading…

A New Industry: These Groups Love Freelancers

Jeremiah Owyang

A booming market emerges: The Freelancer Economy is predicted to be 40% of the American workforce in just five years, and the startups that power them have been funded over $10B – and a whole new class of organizations have emerged to support, empower, and connect freelancers.

Over the last decade, the Social Media industry birthed many groups to serve content providers. The birth of the social media industry resulted in many realizing that the audience gave way to participants. Nearly everyone is now creating, sharing, chatting, rating and ranking alongside the mainstream media. Just as we saw in the social media and blogging industry the rise of organizations to cater to these new influencers, such as BlogHer, Federated Media, Clever Girls, Glam and IZEA to offer events, gifts, sample products, services, and more, we’re beginning to see it repeat.

The Collaborative Economy industry is birthing many groups to help service providers. That same metaphor is now repeating in the Collaborative Economy. Individuals, called “micro-entrepreneurs” or “freelancers” or “Makers” or “hosts/drivers/taskrabbits” are now creating their own goods and experiences, alongside Fortune 500 companies. To help standardize the language being used in the Collaborative Economy, these folks are called Providers, who offer rides, homes, goods, and services to Partakers, learn more about the three Ps, on this definitive post.


Social Media vs Collaborative Economy: Reach and Intimacy

Trusted Peer Cohort Reach Intimacy
Social Media Influencers, Bloggers, and YouTube celebs. High, they can reach thousands to millions of eyeballs in a single tweet, and with engagement, a network effect. Low, they’re unable to have meaningful converations with all of their following.
Providers, Freelancers, Airbnb Hosts, and RideShare Drivers. Low, they can only reach those in proximity they’re working with. High, since peers trust them for rides and experiences, they’ll trust them for recommendations of other offerings.

Continue Reading…

A New Way To Get Your News

Business Insider

Blendle, an exciting Dutch startup that has attracted 200,000 users in the region to a platform that lets readers make micropayments for individual newspaper and magazine articles rather than having to sign up to monthly digital subscriptions, has just got even more exciting.

The New York Times (which is also an investor in Blendle), The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal have signed up to the platform.

That’s huge. Until now, only Dutch publishers had signed up to Blendle. The company had managed to convince pretty much all the major newspaper and magazine publishers in the Netherlands to come on board, but its chances of scale were limited at best because its content was restricted to the Dutch language.

But now, as Blendle’s founder Alexander Klöpping states in a press release: “It’s a great honor that three of the most important newspapers in the world will start working with us.”

It also shows that major US newspapers are willing to experiment with how they charge readers to access their content online.

Earlier this week, at the Digital Media Strategies conference in London, Klöpping hinted that Blendle is looking to expand in France or Germany next. Blendle’s press release announcing its new partners confirms the platform will be expanding internationally this year.

Here’s how Blendle works: Users register for Blendle and put in their credit-card details just once at the beginning of the process in which they create a newsfeed of stories about the topics in which they are interested. When they click on a headline, the app/website takes a small payment. And — perhaps the most intriguing part of the whole offer — if readers don’t like an article, they can get an instant refund if they provide feedback.

On average articles cost 20 cents each, according to Blendle. The pricing per article is set by the publisher. The revenue split is roughly 30/70 between Blendle and the publisher.

Publishers love WhatsApp’s potential, but struggle with execution

DIGIDAY

Publishers have a love-hate relationship with WhatsApp. While many are seeing big numbers from the platform, they’re also wrangling with a handful of product issues that complicate how they’re approaching the platform.

For publishers such The Huffington Post U.K. and Daily Mirror, which use WhatsApp to send breaking news alerts to readers, the big challenge is the work involved in getting people signed up for the alerts. It’s an arduous process on both ends. To get the alerts, readers have to send a message to a dedicated number setup by a publisher, which is a more-lengthy process than clicking a “Like” or “Follow” button.

But that’s only the beginning of the process: To get those alerts out to readers, publishers have to add every signed up user to a Broadcast List, which is what lets WhatsApp users send messages to many people at once. That’s a long process for publishers’ small social media teams, and it’s made more complicated by WhatsApp limiting each broadcast list to 256 users.

“It’s an absolute nightmare,” said Chris York, social media editor at Huffington Post U.K., which launched its first WhatsApp trials in October. York said that process of adding and removing WhatsApp users from its Broadcast lists has been so laborious that The Huffington Post has stopped actively marketing the feature. “We’ve only just scratched the surface of what we could achieve with WhatsApp and we’re really excited to keep innovating with their platform,” he added.

Other publishers are seeing the same issues. The Daily Mirror, which started sending out WhatsApp politics alerts last week, has already felt the heat. “We don’t have the biggest team, and it’s a very manual process, particularly in comparison to something like Twitter,” said Heather Bowen, head of social media at The Daily Mirror.

But publisher frustrations with WhatsApp are in part due to the basic reality that WhatsApp was designed for small-scale commutation, large-scale broadcasting.

Read More.. 

Can print media make it ‘over the top’?

Capital New York

On a Tuesday afternoon in early February, Time Inc. C.E.O. Joe Ripp was onstage in a ballroom at the New York Marriott Marquis, gabbing with several other top magazine executives—during a discussion moderated by the ever-skeptical media critic Michael Wolff—about the precarious state of their business.

As with most panels that parse the trials and tribulations of media companies married to print, it wasn’t long before the conversation turned to that younger, sexier, more … animated medium they’ve all been getting in bed with: digital video. Ripp, for one, was particularly hot on the type of emerging technology that’s been steering people away from cable boxes and into the on-demand world of mobile viewing and devices like Roku and Apple TV.

“Everyone’s coming out with a subscription, over-the-top model,” said Ripp, using the industry jargon that describes a growing array of streaming Internet television services. “In this new world,” Ripp continued, sprinkling on an extra dash of jargon, “I look at this as an opportunity to create new video opportunities.”

Continue Reading…

Snapchat stories: Here’s how 6 news orgs are thinking about the chat app

Nieman Lab

When Sam Sheffer, The Verge’s social media editor, launched the site’sSnapchat account at the end of July last year, he meant it to be a small-scale experiment.

“I only promoted it on my personal Twitter account,” Sheffer told me. “I didn’t make it an official thing that it was our account, I just told my followers, ‘Hey guys, I’m going to be doing this thing. Follow if you want to.’”

But soon the audience started growing; today, The Verge’s snaps each get about 10,000 views. The Verge, like many news organizations that are active on Snapchat, still views it as an experiment, trying out new ways to use the format — from covering live events like the NBA All-Star Game or the Oscars to a regular series where Sheffer has Verge staffers explain what’s on their desks.

Snapchat’s popularity is booming. Last year, it said that its users sent more than 700 million snaps daily; the company is reportedly in a new funding round that would value the company at $19 billion.

Snapchat’s potential for news outlets became more clear last month with the launch of Snapchat Discover, which lets a small number of publishers reach new younger audiences with well-produced stories that are made specifically for the platform and utilize slick graphics and video. No one is releasing hard numbers yet, but the buzz is they’re amazing. (“But from speaking to people at several other news organizations, I can tell you secondhand that the numbers, at least for the initial launch period, were enormous. We’re talking millions of views per day, per publisher.”)

Continue Reading…

The 4 trends the mobile market will focus on in 2015

Venturebeat

2014 was the year that mobile stopped being the next big thing and became THE BIG THING. Investors poured money into any app that showed the slightest signs of traction, new service providers popped up like mushrooms and most importantly, app developers started seeing some serious profits.

Just thinking back to two years ago, everyone and their neighbor had an idea for a new app. Today, these apps have funding, development teams, and slick demos. The success stories like Flappy Bird and 2048 alone were an inspiration to this generation of app developers showing them how far an original idea can take you.

Generally speaking, in 2015 we can identify four types of apps, each with their own characteristics and challenges.

1. Mobile ecommerce — Shifting the focus from market share to engagement

Ecommerce giants have been adapting quite fast to the mobile world. Most of the major players with a significant desktop operation in place spent millions of dollars in 2014 in paid distribution to secure their customer base and to acquire mobile market share. Nevertheless, there is still a large portion of users who use mobile primarily as a ‘discovery channel,’ browsing apps, and mobile web to get inspired — and are then migrating back to desktop to complete the purchase.

 

Read more trends here… 

5 countries to follow on social media

Digiday

A well-crafted branding strategy from a fast food brand can change your perception about its burgers. But can effective branding change your point of view about a country? Nation-branders hope so.

Nation-branding — a field of branding that extends beyond tourism into highlighting a country’s competitive advantage, whether infrastructure or culture —  isn’t a new thing. But the pervasiveness of social media has allowed governments to take ownership of their own social feeds and engage in niche and real-time conversations online, with most countries’ governments having dedicated social media accounts on Twitter and Facebook.

As Joshua S. Fouts, the former director at USC’s Center on Public Diplomacy said in a Council on Foreign Relations interview: There are plenty of benefits for countries that successfully embrace branding techniques.

Continue Reading…

Infographic: APAC Mobility Predictions 2015

International Data Corporation (IDC) expects the Asia Pacific mobility market to continue experiencing strong growth in 2015 as mobile takes center stage for business growth in both consumer and enterprise markets.

Key takeaways

  • M-Commerce will thrive in Asia Pacific excluding Japan (APeJ), accounting for more than 50% of traffic across several markets
  • Asia will see the rise of numerous mobile wallet formats, all enabled by the humble QR code
  • Mobile Enterprise Applications Platform (MEAP) will struggle for growth with customers buying ready-made apps from large vendors and ISVs

Register for live conference February 5th, 2015. IDC Asia/Pacific will explain why conditions couldn’t be better for strong mobility growth in the region in the coming year.

infographickh Infographic: APAC Mobility Predictions 2015

Designing Twitter Video

Paul Stamatiou Blog

In mid-2011, Twitter rolled out the ability to natively tweet photos. 2013 brought media-forward timelines with inline photos. 2014 ushered in multi-photo tweets and animated GIF support. We’ve just announced Twitter Video to help you capture the moment and tweet video from within the iOS and Android apps.

In this article, I will provide a sneak peek into my design process for Twitter Video. This is not yet another boring sketches and mockups iteration article. Why is that? Because we truly embraced prototyping.

Continue Reading…