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IDC’s New Buyer Technology Spending Forecast; Business Technology Spending Market will Reach $330.4 billion by 2017

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDC’s New Buyer Technology Spending Forecast; Business Technology Spending Market will Reach $330.4 billion by 2017

Framingham, MA – April 8, 2014 – International Data Corporation (IDC) today announced a new report, “United States Technology Buyer Forecast by Vertical: 2012 to 2017,” (Document # 247588) which  examines technology spending by 12 buying segments and how this new technology purchasing behavior differs by 15 vertical industries. According to the new report, the business technology spending market will grow at 6.9% 5 year CAGR from $236.6 billion in 2012 to $330.7 billion by 2017, while enterprise IT grows slowly at a 1.9% 5 year CAGR from $213.0 billion to 233.5 billion over the same forecast period.

  • ClicktoTweet, “Business funded technology  is expected to reach $275.2 b in 2014, accounting for 55% of total United States technology spending”

The new forecast quantifies how much money business areas including Accounting / Finance / Billing, Customer Service, Engineering, Architecture & Research, Human Resources, Industry Specific Operations, IT, Legal, Marketing, Other Horizontal Operations, Sales, Security and Risk and Supply Chain Management are spending on technology, and how this new paradigm differs by industry.  Key findings include:

  • Business funded technology is expected to reach $275.2 billion in 2014, accounting for 55% of total technology spending.  Industry specific operation is the largest business line, capturing approximately 45% of total business funded technology in 2014
  • Enterprise IT spending is growing only at a 1.8% 5 year CAGR, far below the overall 5 year technology CAGR of 4.6%. Only healthcare enterprise IT is growing faster (than overall technology spending.
  • Marketing is the fastest growing functional area, growing at a 5 year CAGR of 9.5%, reaching nearly $26 billion by 2017. The marketing function within the Communications and Media industry will spend the most on marketing in 2014, with the retail  vertical growing the fastest over the forecast period (11.2% 5 year CAGR).

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IT Spending by UAE Businesses to Top $4.6 Billion in 2014

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IT Spending by UAE Businesses to Top $4.6 Billion in 2014

Business IT spending in the UAE is expected to increase 8.3% year on year in 2014 to total $4.63 billion, according to the latest figures released today by International Data Corporation. Referencing its recently released United Arab Emirates Vertical Markets 2013–2017 IT Spending Forecast (IDC#ZV11V), IDC anticipates healthy growth over the 2013–2017 forecast period as the governments of Abu Dhabi and Dubai continue to spend on upgrading the country’s infrastructure.

The public sector, which includes government, education, and healthcare organizations, will account for most of the business IT spending in 2014. Organizations in this vertical are predicted to invest $1.12 billion in IT and account for 24.3% of the spending, driven primarily by government-led initiatives to bring more public services to online and mobile platforms. Government-backed projects to increase the use of ICT in educational institutions, together with regulations in the healthcare sector that mandate a reduction in paper-based processes, are other major factors driving IT spending in this sector.

‘Combined Finance’ is the second-biggest vertical in the UAE with respect to business IT spending. Organizations in this vertical, which includes banking, insurance, and securities services providers, are predicted to invest $719.77 million in IT in 2014. The rapid expansion of branch and ATM networks, investments in online and mobile banking channels, and the need for better regulatory compliance are the primary drivers of ICT investments in the banking sector.

Consumer IT spending in the UAE is expected to account for 30.5% of total IT spending in 2014, though it will contract 8.4% year on year. This decrease in spending is a result of the stagnating PC market, which is being cannibalized by the growing demand for tablets.

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Infographic: Five Key Ways to Enable Your Sales Force Along the Buyer’s Journey

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Infographic: Five Key Ways to Enable Your Sales Force Along the Buyers Journey

Providing your sales organization with the right tools to enable the buyer’s journey is a critical way to help your organization sell more effectively.
By making your sales conversations highly relevant to your buyers’ needs you can help answer questions like:

  • How well assimilated is our value story with sales?
  • Do we have the industry-vertical knowledge, messaging & account intelligence we need?
  • How do we know we are providing buyers with the right information in the right format and at the right time?
  • How compelling is our value proposition and story?

IDC has published a new infographic illustrating five key ways to enable your sales force along the buyer’s journey which can be viewed here.

The one map your CMO must share with your CIO

IDC PMS4colorversion  The one map your CMO must share with your CIO

So many marketing solutions are available that it is very difficult for marketers, chief digital officers, and CIOs to have a holistic view of what they have, what they need and why. IDC has recently created a tool to help – The 2014 Marketing Technology Map. This tool provides a visualization of the different technologies needed to support different marketing organizations no matter how small or large, digital or non digital, modern or not. Pictured below is the whole map which presents solutions in four broad categories:
  1. Interaction: The primary function of these solutions is to be customer facing
  2. Content:  The primary function of these solutions is to facilitate the production and management of marketing content
  3. Data and Analytics: The primary function of these solutions is to store and produce insights from customer, operations, and financial data
  4. Management and Administration: The primary function of these solutions is to provide internal communications, workflows, budgeting and expense tracking.

View the map now… 

The Customer: The Most Important Statistic in Marketing – Everything Else is Just Offensive Rebounds

IDC PMS4colorversion  The Customer: The Most Important Statistic in Marketing – Everything Else is Just Offensive Rebounds

Let’s start with a story that relates to marketing today. When my brother in-law was trying out for his high school basketball team, the coach sat all the players down at the end of one practice and asked them, “What is the most important statistic in all of basketball.” My brother in-law, quite confident his answer would be correct, raised his hand and answered “Points scored.” The coach stared at him for a few seconds and responded, “No. Offensive rebounds.” For those of you who are familiar with basketball, you know that is a ridiculous statement – while offensive rebounds are important, the final score determines the winner, and thus is inarguably, the most important statistic in basketball.

For marketing, the customer is the final score

Today in marketing we are in an exciting phase with so much change happening, but also so much opportunity. The current atmosphere is a scary proposition for some, yet energizing for others. This energy has brought enthusiasm to many areas within marketing that are touted as “the most important.” While areas like marketing technology, big data and analytics, and content marketing are INCREDIBLY important, ultimately, they are only a portion of marketing and not the full picture. In the end the most important “statistic” is the customer. The buyer ultimately judges and scores you, so remember, how well you provide value to your customer will determine whether you win or lose.
Highlighting this customer focus, in our 11th annual marketing barometer survey we asked over 75 senior level marketing executives to “compose a tweet on the future of marketing.” We then took those answers and created a word cloud (see above). Low and behold, the two largest words that came up were “Customer” and “Buyer”. These executives, whether intentional or not, understand that the customer/buyer will determine the final score. So remember, while different marketing practices may have incredibly important functions, in the overall game of business, they are all just offensive rebounds.

IT Maturity Increasing Among MEA Manufacturers as They Embrace Technology in Bid to Drive Productivity and Competitiveness

IDC PMS4colorversion  IT Maturity Increasing Among MEA Manufacturers as They Embrace Technology in Bid to Drive Productivity and Competitiveness

16 Mar 2014

With Middle East and Africa (MEA) manufacturers showing considerable enthusiasm for IT and comfortably outspending their counterparts in Central and Eastern Europe, the sector is well set for a significant boost in productivity and increase in competitiveness, according to the latest findings released today by IDC Manufacturing Insights.

A recent end-user survey conducted across MEA by IDC Manufacturing Insights shows that manufacturers in the Middle East, in particular, now view IT as an area that can help accelerate their manufacturing maturity. To this end, more comprehensive and competitive IT strategies are being put in place in core MEA countries, and more mature decisions regarding IT environments are being made, with customer-oriented initiatives and integration across the enterprise resonating particularly strongly. IT solutions that can be developed around the core enterprise resource planning (ERP) suite are also being viewed as powerful tools for fulfilling key strategic objectives.

“MEA manufacturers are becoming more mature in their use of IT,” says Martin Kuban, IDC Manufacturing Insights’ lead research analyst for Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (CEMA) “Ongoing industrialization and market optimism have translated into increased IT spending, which has helped to accelerate this process. IDC forecasts that 2014 will be a very dynamic year in terms of IT deployments in the MEA manufacturing vertical.”

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Server Market in Asia/Pacific Almost Breaches the US$10 Billion Mark in 2013, Reports IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Server Market in Asia/Pacific Almost Breaches the US$10 Billion Mark in 2013, Reports IDC

Singapore and Hong Kong, March 13, 2014 – Server revenues in Asia/Pacific excluding Japan (APEJ) region grew a modest 1.3% to total US$9,985 million in 2013, coming in just short of the magical US$10 billion mark, according to IDC.  The modest growth in 2013 was in sharp contrast to the heady 17% growth recorded in 2010 and 2011, fuelled by massive infrastructure buildout by Web 2.0 and cloud service providers in the PRC.  Despite the sharp deceleration in growth in 2013 compared to the previous years, server market in APEJ continued to outperform other regional markets on a worldwide basis.

“Strong adoption of server virtualization and cloud technologies in the enterprise segment, rapidly increasing appeal of public cloud providers for specific workloads, and growing interest in Integrated Systems were some of the key technology disruptions that impacted the server spending growth in 2013,” says Rajnish Arora, Associate Vice President of IDC’s Asia/Pacific Enterprise Computing Research.  “Global economic malaise, lack of aggressive economic reforms in emerging economies, and political turmoil coupled with upcoming federal elections in certain countries were some of the non-technology factors that stymied server spending growth in 2013.”

The PRC, which has increasingly become the bellwether and cornerstone of the APEJ server market since 2008, grew at a much more anemic pace in 2013.  The Web 2.0 and public cloud services providers such as Tencent, Baidu and Alibaba building hyper-scale datacenters, who were responsible for driving the heady demand for servers in the PRC for the past several years, took a breather in 2013 that impacted the spending growth.

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Top 3 customer experience challenges for marketers

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Top 3 customer experience challenges for marketers

Customer experience management is fundamentally about providing a seamless and consistent flow as prospects move through different phases of development and points of contact with a supplier. Delivering on this presumes a level of connectedness that many marketing organizations struggle to achieve. The reason for the struggle is that there are three significant forces of fragmentation opposing their efforts: specialization of roles, organizational hierarchies, and tactical technology. These forces threaten every marketing organization with two fatal flaws: they slow everything down and fracture the customer experience.
Three forces of fragmentation that marketers must fight:
1.     Specialization: all areas of marketing execution have become inch wide mile deep endeavors. As a result, there can be many degrees of separation between key roles such as social marketers, event planners, web administrators, technical writers, etc. What do these people talk about when they get in a room together? Does anyone else care how the events person manages food service or logistics?
 
How to combat the fragmentation of specialization: It is becoming clear that the one thing all marketing roles now have in common is the need to master data and analytics. Each specialized role produces and consumes data from all the others. It is critical that everyone in marketing understand how customer and operational data flows, how others use the data they produce, and the best analytical practices for gaining insight. This should be a key topic of conversation and community building.

Top 3 customer experience challenges for marketers

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Top 3 customer experience challenges for marketers

Customer experience management is fundamentally about providing a seamless and consistent flow as prospects move through different phases of development and points of contact with a supplier. Delivering on this presumes a level of connectedness that many marketing organizations struggle to achieve. The reason for the struggle is that there are three significant forces of fragmentation opposing their efforts: specialization of roles, organizational hierarchies, and tactical technology. These forces threaten every marketing organization with two fatal flaws: they slow everything down and fracture the customer experience.
Three forces of fragmentation that marketers must fight:
1.     Specialization: all areas of marketing execution have become inch wide mile deep endeavors. As a result, there can be many degrees of separation between key roles such as social marketers, event planners, web administrators, technical writers, etc. What do these people talk about when they get in a room together? Does anyone else care how the events person manages food service or logistics?

Click here to see the three forces of fragmentation that marketers must fight

Despite a Strong 2013, Worldwide Smartphone Growth Expected to Slow to Single Digits by 2017, According to IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Despite a Strong 2013, Worldwide Smartphone Growth Expected to Slow to Single Digits by 2017, According to IDC

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. February 26, 2014 – According to a new mobile phone forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, worldwide smartphone shipments will slow to 8.3% annual growth in 2017 and 6.2% in 2018. Annual smartphone volume in 2013 surpassed 1 billion units for the first time, accounting for 39.2% growth over 2012. In the coming year, IDC expects mature markets like North America and Europe to drop to single digits, and Japan might contract slightly. Despite the high growth expected in many emerging markets, 2014 will mark the year smartphone growth drops more significantly than ever before. 2014 volumes are expected to be 1.2 billion, up from 1 billion in 2013, representing 19.3% year-over-year growth.

“In North America we see more than 200 million smartphones in active use, not to mention the number of feature phones still being used,” said Ryan Reith, Program Director with IDC’s Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker. “2014 will be an enormous transition year for the smartphone market. Not only will growth decline more than ever before, but the driving forces behind smartphone adoption are changing. New markets for growth bring different rules to play by and ‘premium’ will not be a major factor in the regions driving overall market growth.”

As mature markets become saturated and worldwide growth slows, service providers and device manufacturers are seeking opportunities to move hardware wherever they can. The result is rapidly declining price points, creating challenging environments in which to turn a profit. Worldwide smartphone average selling price (ASP) was $335 in 2013, and is expected to drop to $260 by 2018.

Read full press release