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PC Shipments in EMEA Return to Growth in 2Q14, Says IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion  300x99 PC Shipments in EMEA Return to Growth in 2Q14, Says IDC

According to International Data Corporation (IDC), PC shipments in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) reached 21.9 million units in the second quarter of 2014 — a 10.5% increase year on year and a clear return to growth after seven quarters of consecutive decline. As in the previous quarter, Western Europe drove most of the regional growth, with shipments supported by strong enterprise renewals, which led to an overall 25% increase in the PC market. Consumer shipments also returned to growth after a severe contraction in 2013. At the same time, Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) remained impacted by the unstable political and economic situation in Russia and by currency fluctuations; as forecast, CEE declined by 13.2%. The Middle East and Africa (MEA) posted a modest 1.9% increase in shipments. In line with those trends, portable PC shipments in EMEA returned to growth (up 8.3%), while desktop PC shipments increased 14.1%. The increase in total EMEA shipments indicates a rebound in the market but not a recovery as volumes remain below the 25 million unit mark of the peak periods in 2010 and 2012.
“The clear improvements in EMEA are positive signs for PC manufacturers,” said Chrystelle Labesque, research manager, IDC EMEA Personal Computing. “However, there was still a big difference between the subregions, and especially in the consumer segment the divide between mature and emerging markets is similar to the worldwide trend. While some parts of the CEMA [Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East, and Africa] PC market continued to suffer from unfavorable exchange rates and a difficult political situation, Western European shipments were fueled by low-end consumer notebooks. Even if the comparison is eased by a very poor second quarter of 2013, more attractive products at the right price points encouraged more consumers to renew their devices. Retailers and etailers also seem more confident as new product designs and features better positioned price-wise are now generating higher sales and not only just interest. Promotional activities and vendors’ preparation for the back-to-school period further supported the market. The level of inventory will have to be monitored closely as back-to-school sales progress during August and September.” In this context, Chromebooks continued to grow, but their impact is limited to several countries in Western Europe.
PC shipments in Western Europe have continued to benefit this quarter from ongoing renewals in the SMB space following the end of Windows XP support. Commercial demand remained strong as business confidence stemming from an improving macroeconomic outlook contributed to corporate renewals. Commercial PC shipment growth in Western Europe reached 26.9% — clear confirmation that PCs remain key productivity tools in the enterprise environment. At the same time, the rebound in consumer shipments accelerated and some markets, including southern Europe, returned to levels of business close to their capacity. Shipments in Spain, Germany, and the Netherlands took off, with sell-in up by more than 40%.
“The lack of investments in PC renewals during the past two years contributed to an aging installed base across the commercial market and, together with the end of Windows XP support, this generated large renewal needs,” said Maciej Gornicki, senior research analyst, IDC EMEA Personal Computing. “As the macroeconomic outlook improved in most Western European countries, large enterprises regained confidence and started to replace their PCs, while many companies in the SMB segment reacted late to the change in the operating system. This has mainly boosted demand for desktops in the past two quarters, while the wave of portable renewals remains ahead of us.”

The Rise of Cloud in the Channel

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 The Rise of Cloud in the Channel

Cloud services represent a growing opportunity for partners of all types in a wide array of activities across resale, services, and development. However, it’s of key importance that partners have an understanding of the what, where, how, and why of cloud services prior to embarking on wholesale business strategy change.

This IDC study, commissioned by Microsoft, examines the implications of becoming a successful cloud partner in 2013. Developed with insight garnered through in-depth conversations with leading Microsoft cloud partners and backed by supportive survey data (see methodology for further details), it provides a profile of the potential upside of integrating cloud to a partner’s mix of solution offerings.Finally, it concludes with guidance as a partner begins, or continues, their journey into the cloud.

the rise of the cloud in the channel The Rise of Cloud in the Channel

Standalone wearables coming this year, AT&T executive says

IDG News Service

The most successful wearable devices will be ones that can work without a phone, and AT&T will have at least one of them by the end of this year, the man who manages the carrier’s partnerships said.

“It needs to be an independent device. It needs to do something different for the end-user, for people to buy it en masse,” said Glenn Lurie, AT&T’s president of emerging enterprises and partnerships.

A likely place to start could be wearables for wellness, such as a device that knows when your workout’s begun, holds your music, and lets you post information about your performance to social networks, he said. “I think you’ll see devices like that this year,” Lurie said.

The hottest devices will be able to work both on their own and with a phone, Lurie said. They’ll also have to be simple to use, a bar that no wearable has crossed yet, he said.

Once wearables start talking to LTE on their own, the sky’s the limit of what consumers will take with them, Lurie said. “Just like tablets, it’s going to all of a sudden explode.”

Cars will be another hot category of connected devices, with natural-language commands letting drivers do many things, he said.

“We believe technology in a car can make the car not only a safer place, but a place where you can do everything you can do today with your smartphone in your hand,” Lurie said. But there are hurdles left to be crossed: Cars will need to be able to talk to both Android and iOS phones without those phones coming out of the driver’s pocket. And as cars age through several generations of mobile technology, their software will have to be upgradable over the air. “The car is going to become a smartphone with four wheels.”

Lurie has overseen AT&T’s new businesses and partnerships for years, going back to the carrier’s blockbuster deal to carry the Apple iPhone exclusively for five years. Speaking before the audience at the MobileBeat conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, he wasn’t giving away any secrets about what manufacturers are showing off to AT&T.

“The things I’m seeing are pretty darn exciting,” Lurie said.

Nadella’s Microsoft is obsessed with data-driven growth hacking

CITEworld

Satya Nadella’s message to the Microsoft troops yesterday underlines the way consumerization has changed computing already: To Microsoft, everyone is now a “dual user” who uses technology for work and play. That’s two chances to lose a customer if Microsoft products don’t delight them.

To make sure that those products do delight, and do what people need, Nadella is turning to some of the tenets of Silicon Valley startups like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, AirBnB, and Netflix: Data science and growth hacking.

Change agents and growth hacking

If you talk to people who work at Microsoft, you’ll have heard them use some new language this year, with phrases like “change agent” and “growth hacking.”

Getting comfortable with change and being involved in changing things is what Nadella pointed out that everyone at Microsoft is going to have to do; “Culture change means we will do things differently. Often people think that means everyone other than them. In reality, it means all of us taking a new approach and working together to make Microsoft better.” One Microsoft, as you might say.

And growth hacking is a Silicon Valley startup term that’s a lot more than just viral marketing, SEO, and A/B testing. It’s about turning product development and marketing into a virtuous, data-driven cycle where you get more users by figuring out what users do and don’t want; how they find your product and how they use it.

Josh Elman, now a VC at Greylock, tells a story about growth hacking in the early days of Twitter, when lots of people were signing up but few of them carried on using the service. Instead of emailing those users or trying to show ads to people who might be more likely to stick around, they focused on understanding what was going on.

“We dug in and tried to learn what the ‘aha’ moment was for a new user and then rebuilt our entire new user experience to engineer that more quickly.”

The key was getting people to follow other Twitter users, so they were seeing tweets they would be interested in. “As we kept tweaking the features to focus on helping users achieve these things, our retention dramatically rose,” says Elman.

His advice for growth hacking is very like Adam Pisoni’s principles for turning a company into a responsive organization (something he’s been doing at Microsoft as well as for Yammer customers). Find your heavy users who already love your product and find the features and the pattern of usage that made them into active users. Build things that attract new users — whether that’s your marketing or sharing from existing users — and make sure there’s a way for new users to get started that turns them into active users quickly. Then build more features that your old and new customers will love, and keep on going.

That means getting everyone involved in growth. Early on, Facebook had a growth team that included marketing, business development, product development, finance, and HR. It wasn’t just trying to get more users; it was behind projects like the system for importing email contacts, making Facebook available in multiple languages by crowdsourcing translations of the interface, and even creating the Facebook Lite experimental interface (a slimmed-down version of the site).

 One of the first times I heard “growth hacking” from someone at Microsoft was talking to Jeffery Snover about his “Just in time, just enough admin” toolkit for PowerShell at TechEd this year, when he compared fast releases and agile development to balancing on a bicycle. “You don’t get stability by going slowly,” he pointed out.

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Digital Transformation Era Projects a Promising Future for Enterprise Applications Software, Says IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 Digital Transformation Era Projects a Promising Future for Enterprise Applications Software, Says IDC

The Asia/Pacific excluding Japan (APeJ) Enterprise Applications (EA) software market posted a mediocre growth of 5.1% in 2013. Unlike 2012, when the EA market grew 9%, Asian enterprises were more cautious about their investment in 2013. Although organizations were keen in upgrading existing back-office applications to embrace the 3 rd platform technologies – cloud, analytics, mobility, and social – watchful spending strategy of customers and the ad hoc nature of deployments did not warrant for sustained growth in 2013.
“The 3 rd platform technologies, especially cloud, will be a critical driver for enterprise applications growth in APeJ.  Enterprises are moving from an ad hoc deployment of cloud-based applications and other 3 rd platform technologies, to a phase of strategic implementation. This new era of digital transformation and the speed of innovation of Asian businesses is expected to bring the market back on track in 2014 and through the forecast period,” says Sabharinath Bala, Research Manager of IDC’s Asia/Pacific Enterprise Application Software Research.
It was the usual suspects – SAP, Oracle, Yonyou, Infor, and Microsoft – that dominated in the region from a market share perspective, but most of these major vendors were challenged strongly by niche new players as well as the established SaaS/Cloud-based applications vendors. Some of the names noteworthy of mentioning include Cornerstone OnDemand, Kronos, NetSuite, Workday, and Xero – all of which posted strong double-digit growth in 2013.
“Although most of the major vendors have been creating new internal IP, as well as acquiring assets and expanding their cloud capability inorganically, the challenge of integrating these new resources with their existing portfolio and convincing clients and prospects to take the cloud path remained critical in attracting newer EA investments. But this scenario is slowly changing and vendors that rely primarily on maintenance and upgrade revenue for their existing legacy systems will start losing relevance in the coming days. Vendors offering cloud-based systems capable of delivering the agility, flexibility, and scalability of the dynamic Asian businesses, will trump them in their own game,” adds Sabharinath.
IDC expects the overall EA market to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.4% and reach US$9.5 billion in 2018. Double-digit growth is expected from markets like enterprise asset management, logistics, and procurement; and there will be strong support from mature markets like financial accounting, human capital management, and inventory management.

 

Computerworld Recognizes Organizations Achieving Business Benefits through Big Data with Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards

 Computerworld Recognizes Organizations Achieving Business Benefits through Big Data with Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards

IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company composed of Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—announces the 2014 Computerworld Data+ Editors’ Choice Award honorees. Recognizing 20 innovative big data initiatives that have delivered significant business value, the awards ceremony will take place at the Data+ conference being held September 7-9, 2014 at the Hyatt Regency in Phoenix, Arizona.

“We are pleased to announce the 2014 Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards honorees,” said Scot Finnie, editor in chief, Computerworld. “This year’s honorees have clearly demonstrated how their innovative strategies use data and analytics to make better business decisions, streamline processes and, in some cases, generate new revenue by tapping into new markets and/or creating ancillary data-based services.”

In addition to recognizing the Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards honorees, the Data+ conference will cover key technology topics involved in a data strategy, from making data available quickly, efficiently and affordably to cleansing and connecting it to selected analytics and visualization tools, then driving new business insights and products from those efforts. The Data+ Editors’ Choice honorees will join business leaders and IT decision-maker peers at the Data+ conference. The full conference agenda can be viewed here: Data+ conference agenda.

“The Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards honorees are not only innovative in their use of big data analytics, but also show real-world results and help establish best practices for other IT practitioners in a rapidly expanding technology area,” said Adam Dennison, SVP, publisher, IDG Enterprise. “It’s exciting to honor organizations that are effectively using data to predict business trends and monetize this information. We look forward to hearing more from these organizations as they lead discussions and share case studies with attendees.”

2014 Data+ Editors’ Choice Award Honorees:

  • AstraZeneca
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee
  • Center for Tropical Agriculture
  • Cisco
  • Colorado Department of Public Safety (Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management)
  • Emory University
  • Google
  • HealthTrust Technology Innovation (Division of HCA Information Technology & Services)
  • Idaho National Laboratory
  • Intel Corporation
  • Keller Williams Realty
  • Kennesaw State University
  • Kisters
  • Los Angeles Clearinghouse
  • Merck & Co.
  • Persistent Systems
  • Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium
  • Shine Technologies
  • Texas Children’s Hospital
  • ThomsonReuters

The Data+ Editors’ Choice Awards honorees and their achievements will also be highlighted in a special September feature on Computerworld.com.

Sponsors
Current Data+ sponsors include: Information Builders, Neudesic, Saxon Global Inc.,ThoughtSpot Inc., and TIBCO Software Inc.For more information regarding sponsorship opportunities, please contact Adam Dennison, SVP, publisher, IDG Enterprise atadennison@idgenterprise.com.

Registration Information
To learn more about the conference, view the agenda, or to register visit:www.dataplusconference.com, call 800.355.0246 or email seminars@nww.com.

About Computerworld’s Data+ Editor’s Choice Awards
The Computerworld Data+ Editors’ Choice awards program was launched in 2013 by IDG’s Computerworld editorial team to recognize organizations that are mining big data to analyze and predict business trends and monetize this information. Organizations were asked to complete questionnaires detailing their big data projects, which were then reviewed by the Computerworld editorial team. From those questionnaires, honorees were selected for their ability to achieve business benefits through big data, and demonstrate real-world results and best practices. View the 2013 winners on Computerworld.com.

About IDG Enterprise
IDG Enterprise, an International Data Group (IDG) company, brings together the leading editorial brands (Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld) to serve the information needs of our technology and security-focused audiences.  As the premier hi-tech B2B media company, we leverage the strengths of our premium owned and operated brands, while simultaneously harnessing their collective reach and audience affinity. We provide market leadership and converged marketing solutions for our customers to engage IT and security decision-makers across our portfolio of award-winning websites, events, magazines, products and services. IDG’s DEMO conferences provide a platform for today’s most innovative and eye-opening technologies to publically launch their solutions.

Company information is available at www.idgenterprise.com
Follow IDG Enterprise on Twitter: @IDGEnterprise #DataPlus
Join IDG Enterprise on LinkedIn
Like IDG Enterprise on Facebook: www.facebook.com/IDG.Enterprise

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Contact
Whitney Cwirka
Marketing Specialist
IDG Enterprise
wcwirka@idgenterprise.com
Office: 508.935.4414

A walk through the future where everything is connected

CITEworld

Attending a conference on the “Internet of things” is like walking through a bizarro mosaic of the future.

Conferences tend to center on a well-defined market, topic, or large company, and that theme is reflected back in some cohesive fashion by each company in attendance.

“The internet of things”, “smart devices” or “connected devices” (my preferred term), or broad subsets like “wearables” by nature implies just about everything.

Everything, in theory, can connect to everything else via a sensor, processor, and transmitter. That means the boundaries of a connected product and its related vertical markets are, in theory, limitless.

So as you peruse the booths, you see wireless garden sensors next to fabric with sensors literally woven in, you see defense contractor behemoth Booz Allen Hamilton talking about cloud computing solutions across the aisle from a startup shoe sensor company called Boogio (“Makes your shoes smart!”).

As I walked through the vendors and sessions at this week’s Wearable Technologies Conference in San Francisco, I tried to assemble a picture my future life flooded with all these sensors, embedded everywhere, telling me everything.

Imagine:

As I finish up a work project in my future home, Imprint Energy’s wafer-thin batteries power a wristband running atop VirtualBeam’s motion recognition software which informs me when my hands have been gesturing over my Leap Motion sensor for too long, so I need a break to avoid carpal tunnel syndrome. My future wife scans patients at the hospital with Aura’s 3D ear canal scanning system but her Emotiv electroencephalography headband scans her brainwaves and lets me know that it’s been a stressful day for her. I send our drone to go pick up tacos for dinner.

My future daughter plays in the backyard and I know she’s okay because Sensirion’s outdoor sensors tell me that the humidity and temperature are reasonable, not to mention the Leo bands around her legs tell me she’s well hydrated and her muscles are moving well (i.e. she’s running around happily) and her SunFriend wristband indicates her UV intake is still low. My future son practices the virtual drums with his Moff wristbands as he gets ready for his football game where Flextronics sensors will map his muscle motions on each tackle (good form or not?) and his i1 Biometrics mouthguard will alert me in real time when he gets a concussion and store the data in the cloud.

And that is the really the binding agent of all these seemingly random companies.

“It’s about the data!” Frank Ball, CEO of vascular imaging company Evena Medical, booms during his talk. “We’ve heard about generating data. But the money is being in the pipeline that processes that data…. We call this whole morass ‘the data hurricane’.”

Read more…

IDG Enterprise 2014 Role and Influence White Paper

 IDG Enterprise 2014 Role and Influence White Paper

New IDG Enterprise research looks at the evolving role of content in marketing strategies and the IT purchase process — and how making the right moves directly impact its success. As technology becomes central to business growth for organizations across all industries, more IT projects are being driven —and funded — by the business, than ever before. Some see this shift as a threat to the CIO and the rest of the IT team. Although some budgets may be shifting, the IT team’s influence on, and involvement in, technology purchases remains strong.

Download the IDG Enterprise 2014 Mapping the Customer Journey white paper

Personal Computing’s Big Three Get a Little Bigger

The New York Times

Three companies are pulling away from the pack in the PC business.

Counts of second-quarter personal computer shipments released Wednesday by two major analysis companies showed a slower-than-expected decline in PC shipments worldwide, with wealthy markets like the United States showing decent growth. But in poorer countries, alternatives such as low-cost tablets continued to affect PC sales.

The real surprise in the numbers was the relative strength of the three biggest PC makers — Lenovo, Hewlett-Packard and Dell — compared to the loss of market share by almost everyone else. Lenovo appeared to have solidified its lead as the world’s biggest PC maker, a title for which it contested with H.P. for several quarters.

One of the analysis companies, International Data Corporation, said worldwide PC shipments totaled 74.4 million units in the second quarter, a drop of 1.7 percent from the same quarter of 2013. The important United States market grew 6.9 percent, to 16.7 million units. Gartner put worldwide shipments at 75.8 million units, an increase of 0.1 percent, and United States shipments at 15.9 million units, up 7.4 percent.

Among the top five vendors, which also included Acer and Asus, global shipments rose 9.8 percent year-on-year, IDC said, while the rest of the market, made up of about 15 other computer companies, declined 18.5 percent. Gartner said companies not in the top five had a net decline in shipments of 13.8 percent.

IDC said Lenovo had 19.6 million units shipped to the world market, a rise of 15.1 percent. H.P. was second, with 13.6 million units, up 10.3 percent, and Dell was third at 10.4 million units, up 13.2 percent. Acer’s shipments fell 2.5 percent, to 6.1 million units, and Asus managed a 3.3 percent gain, to 4.6 million units.

Gartner’s percentages were much the same, though it scored an even steeper fall for Acer and a better performance for Asus. Even last quarter, according to both research companies, the companies outside the top five had 40 percent of the global PC market; now they are closer to a third. And the analysts expect them to fall further.

The better-than-expected overall performance for PC shipments was attributed to a number of factors, including strong business demand after the discontinuation of support for an older version of Microsoft’s Windows PC operating system, and consumer interest in lower-priced laptops.

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PC Rebound in Mature Regions Stabilizes Market, But Falls Short of Overall Growth in the Second Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 PC Rebound in Mature Regions Stabilizes Market, But Falls Short of Overall Growth in the Second Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

Worldwide PC shipments totaled 74.4 million units in the second quarter of 2014 (2Q14), a year-on-year decline of -1.7%, according to the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly PC Tracker. The results reflect the smallest decline in global PC shipments since the second quarter of 2012 when declining shipments of mini notebooks combined with a surge in tablet sales to disrupt the PC market.

Buoyed by both continued business PC replacements and returning consumer interest, the preliminary results for 2Q14 are markedly better than the projected decline of -7.1% for the quarter. Despite the end of Windows XP support in early April, it appears many Windows XP migrations continue to take place. Most major vendors saw solid growth, and early indications also point to desktop shipments being stronger than expected in some areas, signaling continued business buying. The consumer side also appears stronger than expected, with growing activity among the lower-priced models as well as Chromebooks.

On a geographic basis, Europe, the United States, and Canada showed the strongest growth, reflecting more stable conditions. Japan would have joined list but for the dramatic surge last quarter and new taxes that limited second quarter growth. In contrast, emerging regions continue to see declining PC volumes as weaker economies and political issues combine to depress growth.

“The recent strength in mature regions is a positive sign,” said Loren Loverde, Vice President, Worldwide PC Trackers. “However, an important part of this strength is driven by the rebound from weaker demand last year and to potentially short-term replacement activity. We can look for some recovery in emerging regions going forward, but it may coincide with slower growth in mature regions. We do not see the recent gains as a motive to raise the long-term outlook although 2014 growth could get closer to flat, rather than the May projection of -6%.”

The PC industry remains intensely competitive, with factors such as economy of scale and channel reach continuing to add to the shift toward mobility and new designs in driving market consolidation. While the top 5 PC vendors grew 9.8% year on year in 2Q14, the rest of the market declined -18.5% on the year.

“The better than expected results seem to arise from two places. One encouraging factor was a good intake of lower-end systems, including Chromebooks, which coincides with the recent slowing in tablet growth and perhaps signals the beginning of some stabilization on the consumer side,” said Jay Chou, Senior Research Analyst, Worldwide PC Trackers. “In addition, a sizable number of PCs are still running Windows XP and the impetus to upgrade them continued to boost shipments in the second quarter.”

“In the United States, better alignment with channel partners and internal restructuring helped HP and Dell to grow faster than the market, further consolidating share to 53% between these two leaders. Lenovo and Toshiba also gained share with the highest growth among the top 5 players,” said Rajani Singh, Senior Research Analyst, IDC Personal Computers. “Moving forward, strong sales in the back-to-school season and healthy consumer sales in the holiday season should keep the U.S. PC market in positive territory for the rest of the year.”

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