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Agenda 15

03/30/2015 - 04/01/2015 Amelia Island FL

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6 Technology Innovation Sources for Outside-In Learning

CIO Dashboard

The speed and variety of new ideas makes technology innovation harder than ever before. For most of the last 30 years, those of us in the field of information technology only really concerned ourselves with one major new technology trend at a time – distributed computing, GUIs, OOAD or data warehousing. Now we have not one, but a flood of technologies: mobile, social media, big data and analytics, cloud, the Internet of Things and 3D printing, to name a few, rushing toward us all at once. The reassuring news is that there are as many sources of learning and opportunity to fuel innovation as there are technologies to consider integrating into your technology portfolio. But, you need to know where to look.

Most corporations have a history of learning about new technologies by tapping a few trusted vendors, attending a conference or two and and reading trade publications. Some of the more progressive companies look to universities. Even fewer today rely on the venture capital world and some have taken on their own corporate venturing. But, companies don’t have to invest millions to partner with a university or fund a venture business to innovate in today’s disruptive digital marketplace.

The barriers of entry to innovate have never been lower as easy-to-access communities with ideas and talent grow more and more plentiful. For a fraction of the cost of traditional outside-in innovation, you can open the door to intriguing worlds and be inspired to create a new product or business model, source talent or acquire a company. I guarantee that if you explore at least one of these communities your mind will start to swim with possibilities for how to push your company’s agenda forward. It’s time to fight fire with fire to stoke the flames of innovation by bringing the outside in.

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Tablet Adoption in Commercial Segment to Drive Growth in Western Europe

IDC PMS4colorversion  Tablet Adoption in Commercial Segment to Drive Growth in Western Europe

According to figures published by International Data Corporation (IDC), the commercial tablet market will reach more than 11 million units by 2019 in Western Europe, achieving more than 130% growth (2014–2019) (IDC EMEA Tablet Tracker Forecast, 4Q14, February 2015). Tablets continue to represent a significant opportunity for device makers in the coming years.

Since their launch in 2010, tablets have been strong in the consumer segment and have benefited from early adopters in enterprises. The introduction of tablets contributed to an ever-growing number of computing devices increasingly differentiated in terms of screen size and product features as demand is influenced by end users’ differing mobility needs. Among other things, innovation has brought new product designs, with devices becoming lighter and better connected, and with greater input options, including keyboards. With traditional PC vendors expanding their offerings to include tablets, devices are increasingly coming with the features requested by IT departments (security, for example), while Apple and Samsung have been promoting some of their features for enterprise use.

Based on IDC’s latest survey of tablets in enterprises, their adoption rate is expected to double between 2014 and 2015 and to grow significantly until the end of the forecast period. “Tablets are used in companies of all sizes,” said Chrystelle Labesque, research manager, IDC EMEA Personal Computing. “While the first perception might have been that tablets were entering enterprises mostly as employees were bringing in their own devices, the reality is that more than two-thirds of the enterprises surveyed in France, Germany, and U.K. have already deployed tablets.” (For more information, see IDC’s Western European multiclient study Tablets in Enterprise: The Big Opportunity.)

While the volume of sales remained limited in 2014, IDC expects the market to thrive in 2015, benefiting from continuous price erosion and innovation. In addition, with 2-in-1s meeting productivity needs similar to notebook and providing longer battery life, their penetration in the corporate and SMB areas is expected to increase. The launch of Windows 10 will also facilitate the integration of the device as a notebook replacement, additional mobile device, or computing device in the new era of digital processing. Interestingly, Apple announced in 2014 a partnership with IBM to meet demand from the commercial sector, and earlier this year Google introduced Android for Work, which is expected to increase the relevance and integration of Android in the enterprise area.

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There Is Now a New iPhone App that Encrypts Calls and Texts

WIRED

IF YOU OWN an iPhone or Android handset and care about your privacy, there’s no longer much of an excuse not to encrypt every conversation you have. Now a free, zero-learning-curve app exists for both text and voice that can keep those communications fully encrypted, so that no one but the person holding the phone on the other end can decipher your words.

On Monday the open-source encryption software group Open Whisper Systems announced a new upgrade to Signal, its iOS app that enables end-to-end encrypted voice calling. With the update, Signal will end-to-end encrypt text messaging, too. And in WIRED’s testing of that updated all-in-one app, it’s just as idiot-proof as the two most basic, lime-green iPhone communication buttons it replaces.

“The objective is to be a complete, transparent replacement for secure communications,” says Open Whisper Systems founder Moxie Marlinspike. “We want to have a texting and calling experience that’s actually better than the default experience and is also private.”

In fact, the Signal update completes a suite of mobile encryption apps that Marlinspike has been developing for nearly five years. In May of 2010, Marlinspike released Redphone and Textsecure for Android, two apps that enabled end-to-end encrypted voice calls (using VoIP and the ZRTP protocol developed by PGP creator Phil Zimmermann) and text messages. But users of those apps could communicate only with other Redphone and TextSecure users, leaving iPhone users in the cold. Soon after, Marlinspike’s startup Whisper Systems was acquired by Twitter, putting his encryption app work on a two-year hiatus.

Marlinspike left Twitter in 2013, and in July of 2014 his newly recreated Open Whisper Systems released Signal, a free voice-calling app that’s interoperable with Redphone. That meant iPhone users could have free, secure voice conversations with their Android owning-friends (and each other).

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Ethernet Switch Market Increased 3.8% Year-Over-Year in Fourth Quarter of 2014

IDC PMS4colorversion no shadow Ethernet Switch Market Increased 3.8% Year Over Year in Fourth Quarter of 2014

The worldwide Ethernet switch market (Layer 2/3) revenues reached a record $6.2 billion in the fourth quarter of 2014 (4Q14), representing an increase of 3.8% year over year and 3.6% over the previous quarter. For the full year 2014, the market expanded by 3.9% over 2013. Meanwhile, the worldwide total router market reversed recent year-over-year declines, growing 2.5% year over year and 5.6% sequentially. However, the router market contracted -0.6% for the full year 2014, according to the preliminary results published in the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Ethernet Switch Trackerand the Worldwide Quarterly Router Tracker.

From a geographic perspective, the 4Q14 results saw a break in recent trends with the Ethernet switch market seeing its highest growth in Latin America, which increased at a strong 13.8% year over year and 24.4% on a sequential basis. The Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) region also performed well, growing 7.0% year over year and 8.8% sequentially. North America grew more modestly at 2.5% year over year, while contracting -1.8% sequentially. On the other hand, the Asia/Pacific region, including Japan (APJ), was essentially flat year over year (increasing 0.7%), but was more in line with global results sequentially (up 4.1%).

“Despite precipitous price erosion, 10Gb Ethernet is the primary growth driver of the Ethernet switching market, with 40Gb Ethernet growing in stature quickly, as datacenters seek greater capacity to deliver a feverishly proliferating ecosystem of enterprise and cloud applications,” said Rohit Mehra, Vice President, Network Infrastructure at IDC. “The 1Gb Ethernet market remains important to the enterprise campus network, although price declines will potentially challenge market growth.”

10Gb Ethernet switch (Layer 2/3) revenue increased 5.2% year over year to reach $2.3 billion while 10Gb Ethernet switch port shipments grew a robust 24.4% year over year to reach nearly 6.8 million ports shipped in 4Q14 as average selling prices continue to fall. 40Gb Ethernet continues to rapidly grow as a stand-alone segment and now accounts for more than $520 million in revenue per quarter with year-over-year growth of more than 100%. 10Gb and 40Gb Ethernet continue to be the primary drivers of the overall Ethernet switch market.

 

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Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

PCMag

This is the second time PCMag has had some hands-on time with the Apple Watch. The first time was in September, when Cupertino’s smartwatch was first announced. We were not allowed to put it on, and although we could tap a few buttons, it was pretty clear the watch was in demo mode and only capable of a limited number of tasks.

As a result, most of the story involved how it looked, which admittedly is pretty important for a smartwatch. Looks are the biggest reason people don’t want to wear watches. The other reason is that no one seems really clear on why they need a smartwatch.

 Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

Yesterday, I got the chance to try on a fully operational Apple Watch for the first time. It is no slam dunk, but this watch does a lot more than people realize.

Before we get into the details, it is important to understand where the smartwatch market is today. Smartwatches kind of suck. Big companies like Samsung, LG, and Sony have released multiple models, and none of them have been very successful. The only real success in the space has been the Pebble, a small Kickstarter-backed firm whose modest product has found a number of fans, but is hardly a household name. Despite the best efforts of the consumer electronics industry, there is little sign that consumers really want a smartwatch.

But Apple, of course, is different. And so is its smartwatch. For the purposes of this story I want to look at the Apple Watch from three perspectives: The Watch, the Smarts, and the Apps.

To succeed, Apple needs to do something every other smartwatch vendor has never done before in all three categories: succeed, across the board. It won’t be easy. When Piper Jaffray recently polled 968 iPhones owners, only 7 percent said they would buy an Apple Watch. Then again, they have never tried one on. And they certainly don’t know what it does. Those users will get the chance to see the Apple Watch in Apple Stores on April 10. It will be available for sale on April 24.

The Watch
The first hurdle Apple needs to clear is to simply build a great watch. In an age when most of us rely on our phones to tell the time, that is no small feat. Ironically, this may be where Apple is strongest. The Apple Watch face is a solid piece of metal, either aluminum, steel, or a preposterously priced solid gold version (starting price: $10,000.)

Even in its more affordable aluminum and steel construction, it looks and feels like a $349 watch—that is no small feat. A lot will be made of the bands; there are six different styles and multiple colors. All of them feel well-made, although the Sport line is the most plasticky. Even so, the bands will be interchangeable so one watch face can have multiple looks.

Battery life is 18 hours, so more than enough for one day, but not enough for two. As a watch, this is a downside, but unless you are using an e-ink display like the Pebble, it is to be expected.

The watch face itself seems nearly infinitely customizable. You can scroll between digital, analog, hybrid, and even animated watch faces with a few clicks. There is even an animated Mickey Mouse face that will point out the hour and minutes, although it was a little too animated for my taste.

 Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

But that is the thing, it allows you to customize the face to your individual tastes. The Pebble also does a great job with this, but Apple’s options seem just as robust.

Learning how to navigate the tiny touch screen, however, will take some time. There is a home button, a rotating smart crown, and the touch screen itself. All of them initiate actions. The Smart Crown is pretty sweet, and has the advantage of keeping the screen clear while you navigate. I have more trouble mastering the deep force click—basically pressing harder—but it is just a new UI trick, and will take time to learn. Once I started thinking of it as equivalent to a “right click” it made more sense to me. Suffice to say, it is more complicated than your average watch, but it is learnable.

To me, the first hurdle is cleared. It looks and works like a watch. And a pretty cool one that can be customized with lots of different faces and bands.

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IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

 IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

Framingham, Mass.—March 9, 2015—IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analytics research, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Survey

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Infographic

Mobile World Congress 2015: what it means for marketing pros

The Guardian

With Mobile World Congress 2015 (MWC) in full swing, much of the industry is decamping to Barcelona to see the launch of the latest smartphones and tablet innovations. But what does this mean for the mobile marketing business and how will it actually affect marketing strategies?

On the first day of the congress, Facebook and the IAB hosted a full-day conference dedicated to mobile marketing and advertising. This is the first time the event has addressed this topic as a standalone, having previously focused solely on technology. The talk looked at the finest work in mobile advertising and examined new trends and technologies that are destined to influence the mobile landscape in the years to come.

In light of this, I’m going to look at four trends on the lips of most marketers:

1. Social as media
Social media is now part of most people’s lives. Marketers are always looking for more effective and cost efficient ways to reach their audiences.

The truth is social platforms are increasingly being used as media platforms and by now most brands should recognise the power of social media and understand this is not a phase. A recent BI report highlighted that Facebook remains the most popular social platform, boasting 1.2 billion users. Its mobile advertising accounts for 69% of the social network’s revenuesat the latest count and its new ad server Atlas is perceived as a game changer for cross-screen advertising platforms. Its vast amount of logged-in data is enabling advertisers to plan campaigns across screens, as well as link them to actual in-store sales.

Today, more people now own a mobile device than a tooth brush and according to Mary Meeker’s 2014 trends report, mobile data traffic is growing rapidly – up 81% year-over-year – thanks to mainly video, while mobile is now 22% of consumption. Marketers need to add value in social spaces and the only way to interact successfully is to engage immediately and continuously.

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Why Do Marketers Find the Cloud Dreamy?

eMarketer

Technologies to create, manage and measure marketing and advertising have become essential tools to reach and engage increasingly connected audiences. As a result, in addition to being brand builders and message crafters, modern marketers now also wear the hat of technologist, according to a new eMarketer report, “Marketing Technology: Nine Important Trends for Brands and Agencies in 2015.”

180508 Why Do Marketers Find the Cloud Dreamy?

Through piecing together the products, platforms, solutions, suites, stacks and other analogs for the software and services that help power their operations, marketers have become more seasoned and strategic with their approach to marketing technology. Even so, the technological landscape continues to grow and advance at breakneck speed, posing new challenges as marketers work to assimilate newfound capabilities.

Cloud-based software in particular has helped marketers be more agile and experiment with new channels and tactics. A bevy of tech providers have even adopted the “marketing cloud” moniker to position and promote their vision of a truly integrated marketing software system, causing intrigue but also some consternation among users.

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The future of ‘everywhere ergonomic’ technology

IDG Connect 0811 The future of ‘everywhere ergonomic’ technology

It’s difficult to avoid adverts or news stories about the amazing technological feats the modern ‘intelligent car’ can perform. One of the most impressive is that a vehicle can now ‘know’ its position on the road, sense when it may be veering into another lane and transmit a warning vibration through the seat to jolt a drowsy driver into attention.

This type of technological innovation that makes our lives safer and easier to navigate is set to extend to the workplace. Already, there are smart chairs that measure our posture and how long we’ve been sitting, as well as smart work surfaces that know when we’re present.

In a recent interview with the Economist Intelligence Unit on ‘The Future of Work’, (sponsored byRicoh Europe), Alan Hedge, Director of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University, points out that this type of technology is just the start, “we are at the very beginning of a revolution in ‘active’ objects and products that have sensors built into them.”

Professor Hedge terms this interaction between people and design technology ‘everywhere ergonomics’. While smart chairs and surfaces may not have made their way to all workplaces just yet, many people will already be using everywhere ergonomics at home. It’s only a matter of time before the boom in wearable devices begins to have a transformative effect on the workplace. Think back to how the widespread adoption of smartphones kick-started the shift to mobile working promised by portable computers years earlier. I believe this boom could be bigger.

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Mark Zuckerberg Q&A: The Full Interview on Connecting the World

Bloomberg Business

Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg has a big, expensive goal: to connect the world to the Internet. He spoke with Emily Chang about his plans, after returning from a trip through Southeast Asia and India last year as part of his Internet.org initiative. The interview airs Feb. 19 on Bloomberg Television’s Studio 1.0. The transcript below has been lightly edited.

You are a year and half into this. Tell me your vision; tell me what inspired you to do this.

Zuckerberg: When people are connected, we can just do some great things. They have the opportunity to get access to jobs, education, health, communications. We have the opportunity to bring the people we care about closer to us. It really makes a big difference. The Internet is how we connect to the modern world, but today, unfortunately, only a little more than a third of people have access to the Internet at all. It’s about 2.7 billion people, and that means two-thirds of people don’t have any access to the Internet. So that seems really off to me.

There are all these studies that show that in developing countries, more than 20 percent of GDP growth is driven by the Internet. There have been studies that show if we connected a billion more people to the Internet, 100 million more jobs would be created, and more than that would be lifted out of poverty. So there is just this deep belief here at Facebook that technology needs to serve everyone. Connectivity just can’t be a privilege for people in the richest countries. We believe that connecting everyone in the world is one of the great challenges of our generation, and that’s why we are happy to play whatever small part in that that we can.

What has been your single greatest achievement, and what has been your biggest setback?

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