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The Web is Getting Slower

 

Source: CNN Money

The spinning wheel of death never seems to stop turning these days.

It’s not you. Web pages really are loading slower.

The average site is now 2.1 MB in size — two times larger than the average site from three years ago, according to data tracked by HTTP Archive.

There are a few reasons for this added weight.

Websites are adding more attention-attracting videos, images, interactivity plug-ins (comments and feeds) and other code and script-heavy features that clog up broadband pipes and wireless spectrum.

Sites also have ramped up their usage of tracking and analysis tools to learn more about their visitors. Inserting third-party data trackers not only increases a website’s weight, but also the number of separate data fetching tasks, which leads to slower load times as well.

Photos and videos continue to be the bulkiest part of websites, making up almost three-fourths their size. That proportion has stayed relatively constant over the past three years, even as the total size of websites has grown.

But as more smartphones, tablets, watches and other gizmos are built to go online, developers have to create even more versions of websites and Web components to fit evermore formats. Some websites, for example, have more than 50 different image sizes which can be called upon to load depending on device. This additional complexity requires more code to run, and adds to a website’s bulk.

“The shift from desktop to mobile requests and consumption have had the biggest impact on website performance,” said Craig Adams, VP of Web experience products at Akamai, a content delivery network that services 15% to 30% of all online traffic daily.

On top of all this, websites are using stronger encryption to make themselves more secure. Shielding themselves behind secured protocols requires more code and data crunching power, too.

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Video Will Dominate Mobile Usage by 2020

Source: MediaPost

The number of smartphones in use around the world will more than double over the next five years, from 2.6 billion in 2014 to 6.1 billion in 2020, according to a new forecast from network equipment manufacturer Ericsson. That means around 70% of the world’s population will have a smartphone by the latter date, with the bulk of  new mobile subscriptions (two billion) located in the Asia-Pacific region, and another 750 million in the Middle East and Africa.

Meanwhile the total number of connected devices of all kinds, including wearable devices, will soar to 26 billion worldwide over the same period. Mobile handset subscriptions of all kinds (including non-smartphones) will increase from 7.1 billion in 2014 to 9.2 billion in 2020.

Ericsson also predicts that by 2020, 90% of the world population will have access to mobile broadband networks, causing mobile data usage to soar. Worldwide smartphone data usage will increase fivefold, from one gigabyte per month in 2014 to 4.9 gigabytes in 2020, when smartphones will account for 80% of all global mobile data usage. Overall two out of three dollars spent on Internet services will go to mobile access rather than landline services five years from now.

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Explosive Internet of Things Spending to Reach $1.7 Trillion in 2020, According to IDC

Screen Shot 2015 05 26 at 2.20.01 PM Explosive Internet of Things Spending to Reach $1.7 Trillion in 2020, According to IDC

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., June 2, 2015 – The Internet of Things (IoT) continues to gain momentum as vendors and enterprises begin to embrace the opportunities this market presents. According to new research from International Data Corporation (IDC), the worldwide Internet of Things market will grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020 with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.9%.

Devices, connectivity, and IT services will make up the majority of the IoT market in 2020. Together, they are estimated to account for over two-thirds of the worldwide IoT market in 2020, with devices (modules/sensors) alone representing 31.8% of the total. By 2020, IDC expects that IoT purpose-built platforms, application software, and “as a service” offerings will capture a larger percentage of revenue.

The new forecast is one of three recently completed reports defining the IoT market and identifying opportunities: IDC’s Worldwide Internet of Things Taxonomy, 2015, Worldwide Internet of Things Forecast, 2015–2020, and the Worldwide IoT Spending Guide by Vertical. IDC’s IoT taxonomy includes a view to the horizontal technology stack of hardware, software, services, and connectivity as well as a vertical view to the industries and use cases that IDC is forecasting in the IoT market. IDC’s IoT forecast provides includes the installed base by region as well as revenue projections from both a regional and technology perspective. The IoT Spending Guide focuses on 25 of the fastest growing IoT use cases in 11 vertical industries, including consumer, retail, healthcare, government, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, while also sizing IoT opportunities across the technology stack.

“While wearable devices are the consumer face of the Internet of Things, and where recognition of IoT appears to begin, the real opportunity remains in the enterprise and public sector markets,” said Vernon Turner, senior vice president and research fellow (IoT), Enterprise Systems. “The ripple effect of IoT is driving traditional business models from IT-enabled business processes to IT-enabled services and finally to IT-enabled products, which is beginning to disrupt the IT status quo.”

IDC defines the IoT as a network of networks of uniquely identifiable endpoints (or “things”) that communicate without human interaction using IP connectivity. IDC has identified the IoT ecosystem as containing a complex mix of technologies including, but not limited to, modules/devices, connectivity, IoT purpose-built platforms, storage, servers, security, analytics software, IT services, and security. It is important to note that autonomous connectivity is a key attribute within IDC’s definition and, at this point, we do not count smartphones, tablets, or PCs within our IoT forecast.

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New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

Screen Shot 2015 05 26 at 2.20.01 PM New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

19 May 2015

Spending projections include 25 use cases to provide insight on immediate opportunities for IoT technologies

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., May 19, 2015 – The worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) market is expected to grow 19% in 2015, led by digital signage, according to a new forecast from International Data Corporation (IDC). The second annual forecast focuses on growing IoT use in 11 vertical industries, including consumer, retail, healthcare, government, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, while also sizing IoT opportunities for 25 vertical-specific use cases.

Unlike any other research in the industry, the new forecast specifically highlights worldwide spending across IoT use cases, including smart appliances, automated public transit, remote health monitoring, digital signage, connected vehicles, and air traffic monitoring, among others. The comprehensive spending model was designed to help vendors clearly understand the industry-specific opportunity for IoT technologies today.

  • ClicktoTweet,  @IDC Asserts Worldwide #InternetofThings Market to grow 19% in 2015, led by #Digitalsignage

Other key findings from the new forecast include:

  • The IoT market in manufacturing operations will grow from $42.2 billion in 2013 to $98.8 billion in 2018, a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.6%. Growth will be driven by ongoing efforts to increase efficiency and link islands of automation.
  • Digital signage use in retail outlets will grow from $6.0 billion in 2013 to $27.5 billion in 2018, a 35.7% five-year CAGR, as retailers continue to digitize the consumer experience.
  • The hottest US market is in connected vehicles, with 34.8% year-over-year growth anticipated in 2015.

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Ready or Not, the Internet of Things Is Coming

eMarketer

Think the net neutrality debate is all about streaming videos? Think again. It’s actually much more than that: It’s about streaming your life. Internet connectivity might seem ubiquitous today, between the use of PCs, mobile devices, and smart TVs, but there are major swaths of daily life that aren’t connected yet that soon will become so, such as homes and cars, according to a new eMarketer report, “Key Digital Trends for Midyear 2014: The Internet of Things, Net Neutrality, and Why Marketers Need to Care.”

Connecting all the unconnected devices, machines and systems will involve vast numbers of new internet-enabled objects and large sums of money. In a relatively untapped market with seemingly limitless potential, forecasts tend toward the sky-high:

  • International Data Corporation predicts the worldwide market for “internet of things” (IoT) solutions will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020.
  • MarketsandMarkets gives the IoT market a more conservative—but still lofty—valuation of $1.029 trillion in 2013, increasing to $1.423 trillion by 2020.
  • Gartner forecasts 26 billion connected objects worldwide by 2020 (a figure that does not include PCs, smartphones and tablets).
  • IDATE projects 80 billion internet-connected things in 2020, up from 15 billion in 2012. This figure does include PCs, TVs and smart devices, but the vast majority (85%) will be objects like car tires or shipping pallets that may communicate with the web via an intermediate device. Devices that communicate directly, such as PCs, TVs and mobile phones, will make up 11% of the total in 2020.
  • Cisco Systems predicts 50 billion things will be connected by 2022, yielding $19 trillion in new revenues ($14.4 trillion of which will accrue to private-sector corporations).

“There’s no doubt the world is moving toward a more connected future, but the speed with which consumers and enterprises make the transition to the internet of things is still to be determined,” said Noah Elkin, executive editor at eMarketer. “The timing of adoption will determine just how much money and how many things are involved.”

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The State of Digital Marketing

Sitecore

Approaches to digital marketing in the Benelux

IDG Connect surveyed 53 people based in Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands identifying themselves as marketing directors or mangers, chief marketing officers and vice presidents of marketing marketers, roughly of half of whom work at companies employing 1,000 or more people.

You can find the Infographic below, on this page and download the white paper that analyzes the survey results in detail.

Information technology never stands still, and whilst the pace of its evolution presents marketers with significant challenges it also opens up a wealth of opportunity for companies willing and able to exploit new information consumption trends and software tools to get targeted messages in front of their customers.

Digital marketing strategies can include disciplines as diverse as display and search ads, email marketing, SMS messages, digital events, company websites, search engine optimisation, mobile web and web applications, and social media marketing tools, the combination of which offers unparalleled scope to personalise content to attract new customers, keep old ones and improve conversion rates with timely and relevant offers.

Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 1.54.14 PM The State of Digital Marketing

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Mobile ad spending to hit $100B in 2016 and become the biggest digital ad market

VentureBeat

Mobile ad spending is on a tear. It will top $100 billion in 2016 and account for more than 50 percent of all digital ads for the first time, according to market researcher eMarketer.

More than $101.37 billion will be spent on ads served in 2016 to mobile phones and tablets worldwide. That’s a 400 percent increase from 2013. From 2016 to 2019, mobile ads will nearly double again, rising to $195.55 billion. That figure will account for 70.1 percent of all digital advertising as well as more than one-quarter of total media ad spending worldwide.

It’s all about the number of consumers adopting mobile devices. As that number soars, marketers are chasing consumers into mobile markets. Next year, eMarketer estimates, there will be more than 2 billion smartphone users worldwide, more than one-quarter of whom will be in China.

The number of tablet users worldwide is growing more slowly than the global smartphone audience. But tablets will reach more than 1 billion users in 2015. eMarketer said that in many emerging and developing markets, consumers are often accessing the Internet mobile-first and mobile-only, driving marketers to mobile advertising.

The U.S. and China will drive mobile ads in the short term. In 2016, U.S. advertisers are expected to spend $40.2 billion on mobile ads, more than doubling the total from 2014. In China, advertisers will spend $22.1 billion next year, triple the amount spent in 2014. In both countries, mobile will become the majority of all digital advertising next year.

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Not All Social Media Platforms are Equal – How to Pick the Ones That Work for You

Soshable

Launching a new business? Or promoting an existing one? Either way, my guess is that social media figures pretty high on your priority list when it comes to marketing your brand.

Over 70% of all online adults in the United States have a Facebook account. For the first time ever, 56% of senior citizens are on social media. That figure stands at 89% for young ’uns, or users from 18 to 29 years of age. The millennial generation, consisting of young adults born between 1980 to 2000 and accounting for nearly 30% of the US population, see social media as their primary means of connecting with brands. Over half of them claim that “social opinions” directly influence their purchase decisions.

So we all agree that being on social media is unavoidable if you want to be relevant to today’s consumer.

With the explosion of social media platforms, the question now arises, “which social media platforms will give me actual results?” And this, my friends, is the most sensible place to begin your social media journey.

Research Your Options

The first step to social media success lies in being active on the right platforms and engaging with your target audience in the form that they prefer best. But before you make a choice of which platform would work for your business, you need to first figure out what each platform has to offer you and then proceed by eliminating the least attractive ones.

Before we analyze each platform’s pros and cons, let’s see where they all stand with respect to each other.

The data above clearly shows Facebook as the leader in terms of number of users, followed by LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram and Twitter – in that order. This data also shows us how in a matter of a couple of years, Twitter has gone from being the third largest network to a lowly number five. At the same time, we see Facebook stagnating in its usage figures in the last year with a barely-there upward blip in 2013.

Let’s arm ourselves with some more facts about the top five social networks before we decide which ones work best for our business.

Facebook offers brands the widest possible reach – with 1.34 billion active users per month, Facebook is light-years ahead of competition. As a platform it is marginally more popular with women than men, it’s also more popular among Hispanics and Whites as compared to African Americans. A trend that has been accelerating in recent years is the exodus of teens from the site with 3 million teens dropping off in the last three years.

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Facebook’s New App That Will Make Video Content HUGE

Quartz

Facebook has rolled out a new app that lets friends (and subsequently their network of friends and so on) add clips to an ongoing video focused on a single topic—April Fool’s Day, for instance. It’s potentially a game-changer for advertisers on the social network, which eventually could use the app to engage directly with consumers. And it’s another example of Facebook’s growing emphasis on video.

It’s easy to envision how the new app, Riff, might have been used during last year’s ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which over the course of three months generated more than 17 million videos posted on Facebook while raising awareness and money to fight Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The video-driven campaign contributed to the huge increase in the number of video posts on Facebook last year—up 94% in the US and 75% globally. In January, the company said that video views on the social network had reached 3 billion a day. “If you go back five years ago, a lot of Facebook was primarily text, right, and a little bit of photos,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg told investors. “Now, I think the primary mode that people are using to share is photos, and I wouldn’t be surprised if in the future that shifted more and more towards videos.”

Facebook’s challenge is getting users to see the value of Riff. The few companies that have ventured into this niche haven’t seen major success. JumpCam, for instance, ranks No. 1,346 in the App Store’s social networking category, according to App Annie. CompetitorsMixBitCollabraCam, and Vyclone haven’t fared much better in the rankings.

But Facebook is pressing on with its video efforts—at its developer conference last week it announced plans to bring immersive videos with 360° perspective to the social network and its virtual-reality platform, Oculus.

“What really matters is that consumers are using video on Facebook, because that gives us an opportunity, one, to provide a great consumer experience, but two, to have ads match that consumer experience,” chief operating office Sheryl Sandberg said on the company’s most recent quarterly earnings call. “If there wasn’t consumer video on Facebook, video ads in your news feed would be very jarring.”

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Join The IDG Contributor Network!

IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—has accepted more than 100 technology experts into the IDG Contributor Network. Launched in June 2014, the IDG Contributor Network provides a platform for technology and security practitioners and experts to share their expertise on the most pressing technology topics—both broad and niche—with their peers through blog posts on IDG Enterprise’s branded sites.

Technology decision-makers often reference peers as a top source of information. This was reconfirmed in the 2014 IDG Enterprise Role & Influence study, highlighting that peers and technology content sites are the top information resources relied on by IT leaders to help them be effective in their role. The IDG Contributor Network unites these two tremendous resources and encourages individuals working in the IT trenches, analysts, researchers, authors, professors and other experts to share their knowledge.

“Technology is transforming business at a breakneck speed. By adding this opportunity for peer voices to our established sites, the IDG Contributor Network provides unique perspectives on technology and leadership issues. We have been very impressed with the blog posts shared by our contributors,” said Joyce Carpenter, director of the IDG Contributor Network, IDG US Media. “As we look to expand the number of contributors to make the IDG Contributor Network one of the largest and most robust communities of tech writers, we encourage individuals who have technology expertise to share to apply.”

 

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