Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

digital-media

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Microsoft CEO Nadella Unveils Data-Analysis Tools

Bloomberg

Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella touted new products at an event in San Francisco for the third time in as many weeks, part of an effort to re-establish the software maker as an innovator.

Nadella, who took the top job in February, unveiled new tools and software for sifting through large amounts of data to identify trends and patterns at a meeting with developers today at the Bentley Reserve Building.

The company has been rolling out products for corporate clients that are seeking to manage Web-linked devices and crunch the information they generate. Nadella, who took the top job in February after leading the cloud and enterprise group, is working to remake Microsoft for an era where mobile gadgets have become central, corporations run software from remote servers and household electronics get more connected.

“The most imporant thing is to create a data culture,” Nadella said at the event.

Analytics tools are in demand as a greater number of hardware devices, from personal-fitness monitors to thermostats to industrial equipment, connect to the Web, generating a sea of data. By 2020, the amount of information created may reach 5,247 gigabytes per person, according to Microsoft. That’s twice as many bytes of data than liters of water in the world’s oceans, the Redmond, Washington-based company said last month.

Read more…

You can’t stop shadow IT, so here’s how to manage it

CITEworld

The traditional walled-garden approach to IT simply won’t work in a world where any user can sign up for a free Dropbox account or put an Amazon Web Services server instance on her credit card. But IT managers will still get fired for embarrassing data leaks. So what can a modern IT department do?

David Hoff, the cofounder and CTO of cloud integration providers Cloud Sherpasand a speaker at the upcoming CITE Conference, says the key is to stop fighting the shadow and establish clear lines of communication with business owners.

“The more walls you put up, the more difficult it is to enforce them,” he told CITEworld. “Take an advisory role. That way the business will come to you and say ‘I need a storage solution, I need something that works from my iPad,’ rather than thinking ‘If I talk to IT they’re going to limit me.’”

Hoff says the most common services used without IT permission are collaboration and file-sharing solutions like Dropbox, Box, SugarSync, and Google Drivem, but he also says it’s “common” for sales and marketing departments to go rogue with products like Salesforce or web hosting services for public-facing web sites. “It goes on the marketing guy’s credit card and nobody’s the wiser until there are integration needs.”

The same goes for departmental iPad apps that go through some API to interact with corporate data. Even developers are getting into the act.

“In some organizations, developers will go start building on Amazon.com because of frustration levels in their own departments with getting the resources they need. Even though they’re in the IT department, a lot of times still gets put on a personal credit card and expensed.”

Read more…

How a mobile-first word processor could beat Word for iPad

CITEworld

Bret Taylor got the idea for a mobile-first word processor back when he was the CTO at Facebook, and launched the result, Quip, last summer. But that was before Microsoft really got into the game with a full-featured, touch-first version of Office for the iPad. So does that eliminate the need for products like Quip?

Not at all — the startup says it hasn’t seen any effect on demand at all. “It reflects the fact that people are less interested in typesetting words on a piece of 8.5 by 11 paper,” Taylor told CITEworld. “They did quite a good job on the software, it’s quite well crafted in my opinion. But it doesn’t change collaboration. You can’t have two people edit the same thing at the same time, you still have to go to email to edit anything. They brought PC software to a tablet but didn’t solve the fundamental problem people wanted to solve, which is more effective communications and collaboration.”

That’s the whole design principle behind Quip — it’s not just a word processor, it’s a new way of working with documents that takes full advantage of the way people work with mobile devices.

For example, explains Taylor, “When you share a Quip document, the first time they open it, you get a push notification on your phone.” Then you can open the same document and comment on it with them in real time; the comment stream appears in the left hand side of the app, right next to the document itself. “It’s like walked to the person’s desk and walked through it with them, you’re reading with them, they’re asking question. It changes dynamic. It’s much more informal.”

Taylor says that a lot of early Quip users have said it’s “faster” than using other word processors. “Not faster performance in a technical sense, but because they can expect a response immediately.”

Continue reading…

NIELSEN KICKS OFF FINAL PRE-LAUNCH TEST OF MOBILE AD MEASUREMENT SOLUTION

Nielson Press Release

Nielsen today announced the launch of the final technical trial as it gears up to expand Nielsen Online Campaign RatingsTM to mobile this summer. BrightRoll and TubeMogul, two of the largest video ad platforms in the digital space, will participate. Both companies have been using Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings in an always-on, fully integrated manner for the past eighteen months.

Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings measures the audience of digital advertising and has emerged as the standard for buying and selling online ads, including video ad guarantees. With the addition of mobile, Nielsen Campaign Ratings will become the first and only measurement suite to offer robust insight into a campaign’s full digital and cross-platform audience.

“Mobile has grown quickly to become an important part of brands’ marketing strategy, and as such, advertisers are seeking ways to more accurately measure campaign impact and engagement,” Tim Avila, SVP of Marketing Operations, BrightRoll. “Our clients rely on Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings for independent, third party measurement and we are pleased to be working with Nielsen as they bring this important mobile offering to market.”

“Cross-screen audience measurement is critical for advertisers to leverage the trend of increasing mobile video consumption,” said Jason Lopatecki, Chief Strategy Officer, TubeMogul. “We’re excited to be at the forefront as a beta participant for the Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings mobile offering.”

The expansion of Nielsen Online Campaign Ratings to measure mobile devices will use a similar approach to Nielsen’s Media Rating Council-accredited methodology* for measuring computer and tablet browsers, which combines Nielsen’s industry-leading Cross-Platform Homes panel with data from third-party providers, to measure all ads, including video and display. In addition to mobile browsers, this release will explicitly measure in-app ads for the iOS and Android app eco-system. Other clients, including ABC, have participated in earlier technical trials.

Continue reading…

What Is the Future of Proximity Marketing?

eMarketer

Embattled by stiff online competition, brick-and-mortar retailers are looking to the internet for inspiration to improve the in-store experience. Online cookies, pixels and social logins track the shopper across the web, offering insights that ecommerce sites in turn rely on to advertise and merchandise effectively. A slew of new proximity platforms offer comparable tools for brick-and-mortar retailers, according to a new eMarketer report, “Proximity Marketing in Retail: Can Ecommerce Tactics Revive Brick-and-Mortar?”

Although aspects of proximity marketing—targeted marketing with a geographic radius of roughly 100 meters—have been in place for nearly a decade, the field is still new enough to make it extremely difficult to forecast. Its uptake depends on two overarching factors: retailer interest and consumer acceptance.

Right now, the only thing that everyone agrees on is that 2014 will be filled with small-scale tests to see whether the latest generation of proximity platforms can significantly improve the shopper experience and the retailer’s bottom line. Beyond that, opinions are split. On the bullish side, some foresee a radically transformed environment in which the world is, in essence, a personalized and interactive catalog to be browsed and shopped with a smartphone or wearable device. At the other end of the spectrum are those who expect the widespread testing of proximity platforms to show them unready for scaling and hampered by fragmented services, operational complexities and consumer reservations about privacy.

Continue reading…

 

Microsoft’s vision of big data for everyone

CITEworld

Can anyone in your business have the bright idea that becomes your next big thing? Can they find out what’s going on and get enough detail to understand why and then decide what to do to fix the problem or take advantage of the opportunity? Can they do that without drowning in the stream of tweets and emails and reports? Oh, and can they do it without having to turn into a data scientist who can spin up a Hadoop cluster over lunch?

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella talks about getting insights out of the “data exhaust,” which is apt given how easy it is getting to choke on information; big data is no help when it’s too big to keep up with.

What Nadella calls “ambient intelligence” is about being able to use all the data in your environment, but it has to be easy to work with if it’s going to be accessible. When he talks about “everyone in the organisation having curiosity and trying to get insight and take action” he talks about it in terms of Office rather than MapReduce queries and SQL Server stored procedures and data warehouses; the information has to come from there and half a dozen more places besides, but the people who need to ask questions aren’t the ones who know how to use all the different data services where information lives today.

Microsoft’s Power BI service and even Excel are great interfaces for data. Today Excel is a BI tool as much as it’s a calculation tool; you can build a formula and then colour-code the results with conditional formatting that makes it obvious that one building is using a lot more power than the rest of your offices.

The Q and A feature in Power BI turns that into asking questions in everyday English so you can check if that building uses more power because it has twice as many people in as your other buildings or because the heating has been on even when the sun is shining. Is it bad that your travel costs are going up or good that your sales team is travelling to meetings where they sell more products? At least when the information is in an interactive set of charts rather than buried in hundreds of pages of Excel and PowerPoint slides, you can realize you need to ask that question.

Continue reading…

Google revenue jumps 19 percent but still disappoints

IDG News Service

Google reported a 19 percent increase in revenue for the first quarter, but results from its advertising business were mixed.

Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 was $15.42 billion, Google reported Wednesday. That was a healthy jump from last year but less than the $15.52 billion analysts had been expecting, according to a poll by Thomson Reuters.

Google’s earnings per share, excluding costs like those from the sale of its Motorola Mobility division, were $6.27 per share, which was better than last year but also lower than expected.

The results hurt Google’s share price in trading after hours. Its stock was down about 3 percent at the time of this report, to $541.13.

The number of paid clicks, or clicks on ads paid for by advertisers, climbed 26 percent from the first quarter last year, Google said. But the cost of those clicks, or the amount advertisers paid, dropped roughly 9 percent.

Subtracting traffic acquisition costs, or the money Google pays to partners that run its ads or direct traffic to its websites, the company’s net revenue was $12.19 billion.

Read more…

We are drowning in data about readers and attention, but which metrics really matter? You won’t like the answer

Gigaom

Thanks to the web and real-time measurement tools, the media industry has gone from having virtually no hard data on readers and attention to an embarrassment of riches — not only can we measure what people click on, but we can measure how far down the page they got when they were reading, whether they posted a comment, which social networks they came from, and a hundred other pieces of data. The only problem is that this is very much a double-edged sword.

New York Times media writer David Carr recently looked at some examples of media companies that are rewarding their writers based on traffic statistics and other measurements, including The Oregonian — whose efforts I wrote about here. But is paying your journalists based on pageviews or other metrics a smart way to align their incentives with your goals as a business, or does it poison the well when it comes to enhancing or encouraging creativity?

This fear of well-poisoning has even led some outlets — including The Verge and MIT’s Technology Review — to deny their journalists access to the statistics about readers and attention, because they’re concerned that it might distort their judgement about which stories to cover or how much time to devote to them. But then how do writers know whether their work is reaching an audience?

Be careful what kind of incentives you use

In a piece he wrote for the American Journalism Review this week, Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile (who is also an adjunct professor of journalism at Columbia) looked at both sides of the data sword. One danger of using the wrong metrics to reward your journalists, he noted — as I also tried to point out in a recent post — is that you wind up incentivizing the wrong thing, and that can take your site far away from what its original goals were:

Read more…

IDG Connect Buyer Research Proves Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors’ Bottom Line

IDG Connect 0811 IDG Connect Buyer Research Proves Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors’ Bottom Line

IDG Connect’s survey of over 200 enterprise technology decision makers within organizations of 1,000 or more employees shows that vendors are not creating content that is relevant to their needs when making purchase decisions:

“A strong potential ROI case can be made for attaining a sufficient level of relevance”

  • 66% of technology buyers feel that digital content needs to be more aligned with organizational objectives and relevant to the decision making process.
  • 79% of buyers said that vendors’ level of relevant content affects their likelihood to make the shortlist.
  • Vendors are 25% less likely to make the shortlist if their content does not meet a minimum level of relevance.

This highlights an urgent need for vendors to understand the full buying process and the various content types and formats buyers need at different stages of the journey.

“If vendors do not improve their understanding of what makes content relevant, they will continue to frustrate buyers,” explains Bob Johnson, principal analyst and VP at IDG Connect.

Johnson adds, “Vendors need to realize the impact that their digital content has on not just filling the funnel with leads but in moving buyers through the funnel. A lack of alignment with organizational needs and relevance to the individual buying team member will cause vendors to lose opportunities before they come into view. This will impact their bottom line.”

“A strong potential ROI case can be made for attaining a sufficient level of relevance,” he concludes. “Now lines-of-business exert even more power over technology-related investment decisions; the requirement is more complicated but also has never been more important.”

Please or in order to access this content.

World Tech Update- April 17, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Google buys drone maker Titan Aerospace, NHK shows off 8K television and we go inside the world’s most powerful X-ray laser.