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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

Continue reading… 

The Transformation Equation

 The Transformation Equation

Digital business initiatives are illuminating the value of the enterprise infrastructure. At the same time, these business demands are increasing the pace at which IT must deploy new capabilities. In order to deliver, IT has to transform itself. The Transformation Equation explores how Enterprise IT is responding to this digital disruption. According to Network World’s 2015 State of the Network Survey, Network IT is already changing: 60% of technology and business professionals agree that collaborative teams are taking control of the network, especially at large companies.

Screen Shot 2015 05 18 at 12.01.12 PM 232x300 The Transformation Equation

This white paper will:

  • Provide a better understanding of how IT decision-makers are responding to digital disruption through integrating emerging technologies.
  • Present an in-depth look at the enterprise IT agenda, from cloud computing to mobile and security.
  • Show how software-defined networking (SDN) can add flexibility to the network.

Download the full white paper here

Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

IDG Connect 0811 Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

This is a contributed piece from Eneas Bernardo, Managing Director Brazil, RED

This article is the story of a conflict, between what the Millennial generation of IT staff is expecting, and what the business environment is demanding. It’s about what’s happening in Brazil – but it applies to some extent everywhere in the world.

Does IT matter?

The story starts a few years ago in 2003, when, in an article, Nicholas Carr stated, “IT doesn’t matter”. With this statement, Carr threw cold water over the industry. His article brought to light the darkest fear of the IT sector: that rather than be recognized as a business advantage, it was being seen mostly as a cost.

This fear had already been felt to some extent by the ‘mainframe generation’, also known as baby boomers. It might have been sensed, and probably ignored, by their younger cousins, the ‘Downsizers’ or ‘Generation X’.

But the youngest generation in the workforce, the ‘Netties’ or ‘Generation Y’, had grown up in a world where IT was all around and to them it was ever-present. Regardless of Carr’s predictions, IT continued to play a key role, at least for the time being.

Increasing pressures

Moving forward to the next scene in our story, we see the pressure over IT projects increasing on staff. And, as they struggle to gain the elusive benefits of IT that they still believe are there, many companies are spending more and more money on ERP and other buzzwords that promised competitive advantage and best practices – and the gold ticket for growth and profitability.

Cut to the next scene: the global financial crisis of the 2000s and 2010s. To respond, organisations kicked off a desperate pursuit for cost cutting, and strove to innovate in order to survive – let alone be profitable.

What it means for staff

What’s been the impact on staff of these recent trends?

With unemployment at the highest rates since the great depression, there are also more people to educate, more people to feed, and more people to employ. At the same time, businesses are looking for fewer employees.

Business targets and plans are also piling on the pressure. Projects are shortened, costs are reviewed, and staffing is reduced – so the people who remain need to handle more and more duties. Staff must take on more projects, deliverables and targets. They need to handle quality assurance, to consider new issues such as sustainability, and to evaluate information and data coming from many sources such as financials, manufacturing, human resources, customer relationship management and the supply chain.

Continue Reading…

The State of Digital Marketing

Sitecore

Approaches to digital marketing in the Benelux

IDG Connect surveyed 53 people based in Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands identifying themselves as marketing directors or mangers, chief marketing officers and vice presidents of marketing marketers, roughly of half of whom work at companies employing 1,000 or more people.

You can find the Infographic below, on this page and download the white paper that analyzes the survey results in detail.

Information technology never stands still, and whilst the pace of its evolution presents marketers with significant challenges it also opens up a wealth of opportunity for companies willing and able to exploit new information consumption trends and software tools to get targeted messages in front of their customers.

Digital marketing strategies can include disciplines as diverse as display and search ads, email marketing, SMS messages, digital events, company websites, search engine optimisation, mobile web and web applications, and social media marketing tools, the combination of which offers unparalleled scope to personalise content to attract new customers, keep old ones and improve conversion rates with timely and relevant offers.

Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 1.54.14 PM The State of Digital Marketing

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The Power of Knowledge

The Power of Knowledge white paper takes a comprehensive look at the IDG Enterprise 2014 Customer Engagement research to better understand the preferences of the IT buyer. The results find that IT decision-makers do not need more content, but more reliable, credible and accurate information throughout the purchase process.

This white paper will:

  • Explain the challenges IT decision-makers have when it comes to finding useful information.
  • Provide a better understanding of timing, format and relevance of the content that your target audience is searching for.
  • Highlight key ways social sharing of content and social interactions help create a trustworthy brand, and how IT buyers better perceive these brands.
  • Show how technology marketers and sales can better integrate in order to ensure a smoother customer journey.

 

Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 1.00.24 PM The Power of Knowledge

Click here for your copy… 

5 habits of effective data-driven organizations

Venture Beat

Want to master the CMO role? Join us for GrowthBeat Summit on June 1-2 in Boston, where we’ll discuss how to merge creativity with technology to drive growth. Space is limited and we’re limiting attendance to CMOs and top marketing execs. Request your personal invitation here!


A senior banker – let’s call him Jack — was on a conference call attempting to close out an acquisition. The stakes were high. It was a multibillion-dollar deal and the negotiation of the final price hinged on the measurement of the target’s EBITDA, the Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization. Jack argued that the EBITDA was lower; the opposite party asserted it was higher.

In the middle of the lengthy, convoluted discussion of the numbers, a junior associate realized that, in fact, the other side was right. She passed Jack a note letting him know this. Jack stared at the associate with contempt and proceeded to argue even more vehemently for the lower price. He literally just spoke louder than the other party, cutting them off at every opportunity. And he won. The other side just gave up. In the associate’s words, “I knew Jack was wrong. Jack knew Jack was wrong. The other side knew Jack was wrong, and Jack still won!”

How can we build teams and organizations that don’t succumb to the jerk who just yells more, argues louder? We all want to be data-driven instead of being driven by supposition, ego, and ideology

Over the last two years, I’ve had the opportunity to meet with analysts and leaders inside data-driven organizations as well as many that were not so data driven. Surprisingly, I’ve learned that being data driven has little correlation to size or geography and only a marginal correlation to industry. Data-driven companies range from small health care firms to large banks and even include mid-sized non-profits. And while the traditional categorizations of businesses have little to offer, I’ve observed a few common characteristics:

1. Size doesn’t matter, but variety does. You would think that a data-driven organization has a lot of data, petabytes of data, exabytes of data. In some cases, this is true. But in general, size matters only to a point. For example, I encountered a large technology firm with petabytes of data but only three business analysts. What really matters is the variety of the data. Are people asking questions in different business functions? Are they measuring cost and quality of service, instrumenting marketing campaigns, or observing employee retention by team? Just getting a report at month end on profits? You’re probably not data driven.

2. Everyone has access to some data. Almost no one has access to all of it. There are very few cultures where everyone can see nearly everything. Data breach threats and privacy requirements are top of mind for most data teams. And while these regulations certainly stunt the ability of the company to make data available, most data-driven companies reach a stage where they have developed clear business processes to address these issues.

3. Data is all over the place. One would think that the data is well organized and well maintained — as in a library, where every book is stored in one place. In fact, most data-driven cultures are exactly the opposite. Data is everywhere — on laptops, desktops, servers.

Continue reading… 

Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora

Talking New Media

Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market

NEW YORK, NY – April 13, 2015 – Madison Logic Data, the premier provider of demographic and intent data solutions for leading B2B marketers worldwide, today announced that it has rebranded as Bombora. Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market.

Bombora’s growing database of interest areas for 245 million business decision makers and more than 2 million unique companies worldwide, creates efficiencies across all aspects of the B2B sales and marketing stacks, including email marketing, site personalization, inside sales, lead scoring, and content creation. With more than 1 billion business interactions each month, Bombora has become the B2B standard in providing scale for B2B applications.

bomboralogolgTestNew 300x85 Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora“Behavioral intent data has proven its worth as a vital targeting tool, but unfortunately, most B2B marketers’ access to that data is fragmented, making it more difficult to gain a holistic view of one’s customers and prospects,” said Bombora CEO Erik Matlick. “Bombora breaks down the data silos that cause that fragmentation, consolidating data to enable the entire B2B marketing industry to better understand what companies and individual end users are interested in at any given time.”

During its six-month incubation period as Madison Logic Data, Bombora has already provided an unrivaled volume of high-quality B2B intent data that enables marketers to improve efficiencies and boost engagement throughout the customer journey. Here is what partners and customers are saying about Bombora:

“Bombora allows us to offer granular interest-based targeting to our advertising partners, as well as next generation post campaign analytics,” says Ann Marionovich, Vice President, Advertising Strategy at Forbes Media.

Continue reading… 

New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

 New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

Framingham, Mass. – April 10, 2015 – IDG’s CIO—the executive-level IT media brand providing insight into business technology leadership—announces the enhanced focus on emerging technologies in the enterprise at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremonyconference, from mobility to data/analytics, next gen security, cloud, social and other disruptive technologies. This focus aligns with CIOs’ spending plans. According to the CIO Magazine Tech Poll: Economic Outlook, CIOs will increase spending on edge technologies to 45% of their tech budget in the next 1-3 years and 54% of enterprise CIOs anticipate spending more with newer technology vendors in the next year. In order to accommodate this interest and provide access to the new technologies and vendors driving innovation within the enterprise, the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremony, the conference celebrating the innovative use of technology to deliver genuine business value, will add an Emerging Sponsor level.

More than 300 CIOs and technology executives will convene on August 9-11, 2015 in Colorado Springs, CO at the CIO 100 Symposium to hear from peers, industry leaders and technology vendors on innovative ways technology is advancing the enterprise. To expand the scope of this learning, CIO is inviting new technology vendors—defined as established since 2005—to participate in the conference at the Emerging Sponsor level, to share their solutions and expand their visibility with technology purchase decision-makers.

“Technology is the vehicle that will propel enterprises ahead and CIOs want to know what new solutions and services can accelerate this transformation,” said Adam Dennison, senior vice president and publisher, CIO. “The CIO 100 has always focused on innovation and we are excited to roll out this robust partnership portfolio, providing a full scope of potential partners in one place for CIOs to explore.”

To learn more about becoming an Emerging Sponsor at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards, or any sponsorship level, please contact Adam Dennison at adennison@cio.com.

Registration Information
To learn more about the symposium or to register to attend visit www.CIO100.com, call 800.366.0246 or email: executiveprograms@cxo.com.

Current Sponsors
2015 CIO 100 sponsors include underwriting partner VMware and corporate partnersDropbox and Sungard Availability Services.

More Information…

Video: IT Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Across The 3rd Platform

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Video: IT Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Across The 3rd Platform

How are vendors, IT enterprises, and investors making decisions with 3rd Platform technologies? Since 2012, M&A deals have been skyrocketing in both deal volume and value. In 2014, total IT disclosed deal volume jumped to $476 billion and had almost 1,300 deals associated with cloud, mobile, social, and big data technologies.

IDC’s Vendor Watch Service provides expert guidance on smaller, private tech vendors before they hit the public radar.

Click here to watch IDC Tech Talk videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/IDCTechTalk

IDC’s TechTalk highlights the latest industry trends for IT Executives, brought to you by IDC’s leading analysts. Browse topics from Cloud Computing, Mobility, Social Business, Big Data and more

IDC Introduces Russia ICT Market Outlook

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDC Introduces Russia ICT Market Outlook

IDC launched Russia ICT Market Outlook, a new quarterly service tracking the supply and consumption of IСT products and services in the country in the context of recent dramatic economic and political events.

Since the 1990s, suppliers to Russia have had to deal with several periods of instability. However, market declines have always reversed quickly, and it became rather easy to take a stoic view of Russia’s volatility. The situation changed in 2014: The Russian economy, and subsequent IT demand, are now in what looks like a lengthy period of contraction. According to the latest IDC data, the overall IT market in Russia declined 16% in 2014 and an even more dramatic decline is forecast for 2015.

In 2015, Russian ICT consumers will be forced to readjust their spending in the light of the new economic reality. Business customers will be reviewing all aspects of their current spending, including supplier contracts, choice of supplier, and IT consumption models. In the state and state-owned sectors of the economy, additional regulations covering IT procurement and measures favoring local suppliers can be expected.

“Commerce has become politicized, and it’s clear that both market structure and the potential value of deals have been negatively impacted,” says Robert Farish, Vice President of IDC Russia/CIS. “For the last two decades, suppliers to Russia have had to deal with many operational challenges but this has always been within the context of a growing and modernizing economy gradually opening and integrating with the rest of the world,but from 2014, it looks like these long-term processes are stalling or even beginning to reverse.”

With this in mind, IDC today introduced its Russia ICT Market Outlook, designed to address challenges faced by ICT suppliers in re-assessing the situation in Russia and quantifying how ongoing changes are likely to impact demand in the coming quarters. The new service covers the key developments that strongly influence the outlook for Russia in the short and medium terms, including:

• The impact of sanctions against Russia in terms of IT investment

• New government polices introduced as a response to these sanctions

• Currency devaluation and what the overall financial turbulence means for IT demand

• What to expect in different customer segments in 2015

Read More…