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Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora

Talking New Media

Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market

NEW YORK, NY – April 13, 2015 – Madison Logic Data, the premier provider of demographic and intent data solutions for leading B2B marketers worldwide, today announced that it has rebranded as Bombora. Bombora was created as a new entity to serve as the primary industry source for consolidated intent data for the B2B market.

Bombora’s growing database of interest areas for 245 million business decision makers and more than 2 million unique companies worldwide, creates efficiencies across all aspects of the B2B sales and marketing stacks, including email marketing, site personalization, inside sales, lead scoring, and content creation. With more than 1 billion business interactions each month, Bombora has become the B2B standard in providing scale for B2B applications.

bomboralogolgTestNew 300x85 Demographic and intent data solutions company Madison Logic Data rebrands as Bombora“Behavioral intent data has proven its worth as a vital targeting tool, but unfortunately, most B2B marketers’ access to that data is fragmented, making it more difficult to gain a holistic view of one’s customers and prospects,” said Bombora CEO Erik Matlick. “Bombora breaks down the data silos that cause that fragmentation, consolidating data to enable the entire B2B marketing industry to better understand what companies and individual end users are interested in at any given time.”

During its six-month incubation period as Madison Logic Data, Bombora has already provided an unrivaled volume of high-quality B2B intent data that enables marketers to improve efficiencies and boost engagement throughout the customer journey. Here is what partners and customers are saying about Bombora:

“Bombora allows us to offer granular interest-based targeting to our advertising partners, as well as next generation post campaign analytics,” says Ann Marionovich, Vice President, Advertising Strategy at Forbes Media.

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New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

 New Opportunity for Emerging Tech Vendors to Participate at CIO 100

Framingham, Mass. – April 10, 2015 – IDG’s CIO—the executive-level IT media brand providing insight into business technology leadership—announces the enhanced focus on emerging technologies in the enterprise at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremonyconference, from mobility to data/analytics, next gen security, cloud, social and other disruptive technologies. This focus aligns with CIOs’ spending plans. According to the CIO Magazine Tech Poll: Economic Outlook, CIOs will increase spending on edge technologies to 45% of their tech budget in the next 1-3 years and 54% of enterprise CIOs anticipate spending more with newer technology vendors in the next year. In order to accommodate this interest and provide access to the new technologies and vendors driving innovation within the enterprise, the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards Ceremony, the conference celebrating the innovative use of technology to deliver genuine business value, will add an Emerging Sponsor level.

More than 300 CIOs and technology executives will convene on August 9-11, 2015 in Colorado Springs, CO at the CIO 100 Symposium to hear from peers, industry leaders and technology vendors on innovative ways technology is advancing the enterprise. To expand the scope of this learning, CIO is inviting new technology vendors—defined as established since 2005—to participate in the conference at the Emerging Sponsor level, to share their solutions and expand their visibility with technology purchase decision-makers.

“Technology is the vehicle that will propel enterprises ahead and CIOs want to know what new solutions and services can accelerate this transformation,” said Adam Dennison, senior vice president and publisher, CIO. “The CIO 100 has always focused on innovation and we are excited to roll out this robust partnership portfolio, providing a full scope of potential partners in one place for CIOs to explore.”

To learn more about becoming an Emerging Sponsor at the CIO 100 Symposium & Awards, or any sponsorship level, please contact Adam Dennison at adennison@cio.com.

Registration Information
To learn more about the symposium or to register to attend visit www.CIO100.com, call 800.366.0246 or email: executiveprograms@cxo.com.

Current Sponsors
2015 CIO 100 sponsors include underwriting partner VMware and corporate partnersDropbox and Sungard Availability Services.

More Information…

Video: IT Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Across The 3rd Platform

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Video: IT Mergers & Acquisitions (M&A) Across The 3rd Platform

How are vendors, IT enterprises, and investors making decisions with 3rd Platform technologies? Since 2012, M&A deals have been skyrocketing in both deal volume and value. In 2014, total IT disclosed deal volume jumped to $476 billion and had almost 1,300 deals associated with cloud, mobile, social, and big data technologies.

IDC’s Vendor Watch Service provides expert guidance on smaller, private tech vendors before they hit the public radar.

Click here to watch IDC Tech Talk videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/IDCTechTalk

IDC’s TechTalk highlights the latest industry trends for IT Executives, brought to you by IDC’s leading analysts. Browse topics from Cloud Computing, Mobility, Social Business, Big Data and more

IDC Introduces Russia ICT Market Outlook

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDC Introduces Russia ICT Market Outlook

IDC launched Russia ICT Market Outlook, a new quarterly service tracking the supply and consumption of IСT products and services in the country in the context of recent dramatic economic and political events.

Since the 1990s, suppliers to Russia have had to deal with several periods of instability. However, market declines have always reversed quickly, and it became rather easy to take a stoic view of Russia’s volatility. The situation changed in 2014: The Russian economy, and subsequent IT demand, are now in what looks like a lengthy period of contraction. According to the latest IDC data, the overall IT market in Russia declined 16% in 2014 and an even more dramatic decline is forecast for 2015.

In 2015, Russian ICT consumers will be forced to readjust their spending in the light of the new economic reality. Business customers will be reviewing all aspects of their current spending, including supplier contracts, choice of supplier, and IT consumption models. In the state and state-owned sectors of the economy, additional regulations covering IT procurement and measures favoring local suppliers can be expected.

“Commerce has become politicized, and it’s clear that both market structure and the potential value of deals have been negatively impacted,” says Robert Farish, Vice President of IDC Russia/CIS. “For the last two decades, suppliers to Russia have had to deal with many operational challenges but this has always been within the context of a growing and modernizing economy gradually opening and integrating with the rest of the world,but from 2014, it looks like these long-term processes are stalling or even beginning to reverse.”

With this in mind, IDC today introduced its Russia ICT Market Outlook, designed to address challenges faced by ICT suppliers in re-assessing the situation in Russia and quantifying how ongoing changes are likely to impact demand in the coming quarters. The new service covers the key developments that strongly influence the outlook for Russia in the short and medium terms, including:

• The impact of sanctions against Russia in terms of IT investment

• New government polices introduced as a response to these sanctions

• Currency devaluation and what the overall financial turbulence means for IT demand

• What to expect in different customer segments in 2015

Read More… 

CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data & Analytics Initiatives

 CIOs Lead Collaborative Team in Growing Big Data & Analytics Initiatives

IDG Enterprise’s 2015 Big Data and Analytics research highlights momentum behind big data deployment, investments areas and challenges

Framingham, Mass.—March 9, 2015—IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analytics research, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.

Big Data – A Year Later
Deployment of data-driven projects has increased by 125% in the past year (Click to Tweet), with 27% of organizations already in deployment. The momentum continues with an additional 42% of organizations still planning implementation. As more ITDMs deploy data initiatives, it provides clarity into the amount of data that needs to be managed. Similar to 2014, organizations are currently managing an average of 167.3TB of data, and this amount is expected to increase by 48% over the next 12 to 18 months. The largest contributors to this data growth are customer databases (63%), emails (61%), and transactional data (53%) (View Infographic).

In 2014, with big data showing the potential to create cross-function business opportunities, CEOs were the leading supporter of data-driven initiatives and CIOs were taking the strategic lead. Today, the CEO is still involved however, many individuals collaborate during the decision process, including the CIO (52%), CEO (43%), IT/networking staff (37%), CFO (36%), and IT steering committee (35%). At the end of the day, the CIO still takes the strategic lead and is in charge of data-driven decisions. Even with the CEO’s support, organizations are facing challenges with their big data initiatives, from limited budget (47%), to legacy issues (40%), and limited skilled employees that can analyze data (38%).

“Big data and analytics continues to be a priority and a growth area for organizations. CIOs are deploying data-driven tools that help advance the business through strategic and timely decision-making,” said Brian Glynn, chief revenue officer of IDG Enterprise. “As deployment moves towards mainstream, tech vendors have the opportunity to elevate their customers’ initiatives and potentially alleviate organizational and staffing challenges by providing solutions that integrate into legacy systems and provide an ease of use.”

Continue reading… 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Survey

As Tablets Slow and PCs Face Ongoing Challenges, Smartphones Grab an Ever-Larger Share of the Smart Connected Device Market Through 2019

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 As Tablets Slow and PCs Face Ongoing Challenges, Smartphones Grab an Ever Larger Share of the Smart Connected Device Market Through 2019

According to a new forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Smart Connected Device Tracker, the combined total market of smartphones, tablets plus 2-in-1s, and PCs is set to grow from 1.8 billion units in 2014 to 2.5 billion units in 2019. During that time, smartphones will grow to represent the overwhelming majority of total smart connected device (SCD) shipments, dwarfing both tablets and PCs in terms of shipment volumes.

To read the full press release, which includes a data table showing shipments, market share, and year-over-year growth for the worldwide SCD market in 2014 and 2019, please click here. 

Follow-up questions can be directed toward these IDC analysts:

Tom Mainelli (tmainelli@idc.com and 650-350-6455)

Melissa Chau (melissachau@idc.com and +65-6829-7713)

Ryan Reith (rreith@idc.com and 650-350-6242)

IDC’s 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

By, Kathleen Schaub

What does IDC predict for tech CMOs and their teams in 2015 and beyond?

Sunrise%2B1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

Our recent report IDC FutureScape: Worldwide CMO / Customer Experience 2015 Predictionshighlights insight and perspective on long-term industry trends along with new themes that may be on the horizon. Here’s a summary.

1: 25% of High-Tech CMOs Will Be Replaced Every Year Through 2018
There are two dominant drivers behind the increased CMO turnover over the past two years. One driver centers on the cycle of new product innovations, new companies, and new CMO jobs. The second (but equal) driver centers around the required “fit” for a new CMO in the today’s tumultuous environment and the short supply of CMOs with transformational skill sets.

Guidance: Everyone in the C-Suite needs to “get” modern marketing to make the CMO successful.

2: By 2017, 25% of Marketing Organizations Will Solve Critical Skill Gaps by Deploying Centers of Excellence
The speed of marketing transformation and the increased expectations on marketing have left every marketing organization in need of updating its skill sets. In the coming years, CMOs will not only have to recruit and train talent but also create organizational structures that amplify and share best practices. Leading marketing organizations will become masters of the centers of excellence (CoE).

Guidance: Get out of your traditional silos and collaborate.

3: By 2017, 15% of B2B Companies Will Use More Than 20 Data Sources to Personalize a High-Value Customer Journey
Personalization requires a lot of data. CMOs do not suffer from a lack of data — quite the contrary. Today’s marketer has dozens, if not hundreds, of sources available. However, companies lack the time, expertise, and financial and technical resources to collect data, secure it, integrate it, deliver it, and dig through it to create actionable insights. This situation is poised for dramatic change.

Guidance: One of your new mantras must be – “do it for the data”.

4: By 2018, One in Three Marketing Organizations Will Deliver Compelling Content to All Stages of the Buyer’s Journey
CMOs reported to IDC that “building out content marketing as an organizational competency” was their #2 priority (ROI was #1). Content marketing is what companies must do when self-sufficient buyers won’t talk to sales people. While it’s easy to do content marketing; it’s hard to do content marketing well. The most progressive marketing organizations leverage marketing technology and data to develop a buyer-centric content strategy.

Guidance: Remember that it’s the buyer’s journey – not your journey for the buyer.

5: In 2015, Only One in Five Companies Will Retool to Reach LOB Buyers and Outperform Those Selling Exclusively to IT
IDC research shows that line-of-business (LOB) buyers control an average of 61% of the total IT spend. LOB buyers are harder to market to and are even more self-sufficient than technical buyers. To succeed with this new buyer, tech CMOs must move more quickly to digital, incorporate social, broaden the types of content, and enable the sales team to maximize their limited time in front of the customer.

Guidance: Worry less about how much video is in your plan and worry more about your message.

6: By 2016, 50% of Large High-Tech Marketing Organizations Will Create In-House Agencies
Advertising agencies have been slow to recognize the pervasive nature of digital. While many digital agencies exist and many have been acquired by the global holding companies, these interactive services typically managed as just another part of the portfolio of services the agency offers. Modern marketing practitioners realize that digital is now in the DNA of everything they do and are ahead of their agencies.

Guidance: Don’t wait. Take the lead.

Continue reading… 

 

B2B Social Media: “You’re going the wrong way!”

IDG Global Solutions

By, Jason Gorud

One of my favourite movies is Planes, Trains and Automobiles. In it two mismatched travel companions are forced to endure each other and suffer through a series of unfortunate incidents as they attempt to make their way home for Thanksgiving dinner. In one scene, the two protagonists are on a snowy freeway late at night driving the “wrong way”. While they are on the right path directionally (homeward bound), they are literally driving into oncoming traffic. A concerned couple on the opposite side of the freeway starts screaming “You’re going the wrong way!” Not comprehending what they couple is trying to tell them John Candy assumes the couple is drunk and cynically asks Steve Martin “How do they know where we are going?”

This scene feels a little like what we see on a macro level from the increased push by B2B marketers into social media. Everyone has a goal(s) in mind, everyone seems to be heading towards that goal. Much like in the movie, the problem is one born not so much out of ignorance, but through a series of misaligned choices.

It’s only when we look at the unquestioning adoption of certain social media effectiveness metrics that marketers have been lead to believe are gospel and then examine the corresponding strategies being built on those metrics, that we start to see why some companies are heading down the “wrong way”.

When my firm asks our customers what they expect from a broad social media strategy we often get the following vanilla answers:

  1. Enhance brand awareness
  2. Cost reduction (on marketing spend)
  3. Improve customer experience
  4. Enable innovation (this is more ‘vanilla-swirl’ as not all companies state this as a goal)
  5. Increase revenue

No ‘shockers’ on this list and I have ranked them in order of immediate achievability (the ranking is just my humble opinion). Rather unfortunately many of the clients I speak with state enhancing brand awareness as their initial objective when the discussion starts but only really want to talk about getting to ‘increased revenue’ as fast as possible. Unsurprisingly, very few can articulate how they will map their strategy to achieving revenue growth – they just know they must!

As the conversation continues, cost reduction is quickly reclassified; this isn’t a goal, it’s the a priori reason to use social media. “It’s free” they say, “and once people start sharing and retweeting, our promotional costs will just naturally fall. Hooray!”

Improved customer service and enabling innovation are both brushed aside as many simply pay lip service to “listening” as a way to address these goals. Further marginalization occurs due to the fact that most marketers don’t have personal KPIs tied to these activities.

From there we quickly get to the topic they really want to talk about: how can I generate more leads from social media (i.e increase revenue)?

So rather than view the new “IT” thing in marketing as vehicle to enhance existing programs and achieve those goals, many marketers look at social media as a stand alone initiative. This view essentially forces most to apply metrics they feel should link directly to achieving specific KPI’s attached to more traditional objectives like market share, NPS or new customer acquisition.

And here’s where the initiative ultimately begins to fail and the “social media thing” starts to feel like a whole lotta hype.

In 2014, Gallup released findings from a poll they ran that showed less than 40% of its respondents felt social media had any bearing on their decision to buy a product. I’m sure this is disheartening to marketers; companies in the US spent over $5B on social media advertising! Seeing as how only 5% responded that it “strongly” influenced their buying decision, you have to wonder how anyone is tracking ROMI against this channel.

It’s a fool’s errand to attempt to question a consumer on his or her personal buyer’s journey as it pertains to their response to specific marketing tactics, but the findings are telling nonetheless: Assuming your social media program is going to immediately net you new buyers and bigger wins is risky – especially in the B2B space. You simply cannot rely on the usual metrics people apply to social media activities to gauge overall effectiveness.

The biggest problem we see in the B2B space is this: rather than crafting a strategy that leverages the data that comes out of a well defined social strategy to achieve their goals, businesses are hoping that social and it’s impact on their content marketing strategy will simply net them wins. Consequently the metrics being deployed are not only too simplistic, they aren’t in anyway “linkable” back to executive level goals like revenue generation.

The many successful marketers we speak to have reached this conclusion:

Social media enables success; hyper-attention to social media ‘success metrics’ does not.

If you want social media to work for your firm quickly look at adopting the following mindset:

  • See it for what it is; a component of your marketing strategy that enables and enhances, not something tto be treated as a stand alone initiative.
  • Patience is key.
  • Move beyond measuring social media’s impact on your business via metrics that offer no real insight: page views, followers, shares, retweets, likes,etc.
  • Use the activity and resultant data from social media initiatives to form what we call customer-centric outputs.

So now you’re very likely thinking or shouting to no one in particular “Jason! Oh mighty king of useless jargon, what do you mean by customer-centric outputs?” Right?

So in the spirit of #ThoughtLeaderiness I give you the Jason’s-Blocks-of-Simple-yet-Difficult-Social-Media-Outputs. It’s more commonly referred to as the JBoSyDSO(note to the fellas: The ladies love them some JBoSyDSO so drop it into conversation the next time you’re out at the club looking to make a great first impression – pronounced just like it’s spelled by the way):

07009d9 B2B Social Media: Youre going the wrong way!

To enable an output-based program you have to be patient. The value of the “outputs” only grow over time. As data aggregates, the ability to conduct longitudinal studies grows; insight into regions, verticals, companies and even individuals becomes so much more rich – and with this your ability to make intelligent choices in marketing, sales and product development improves.

And this is the difficulty many firms have: patience and willingness to make basic investments in the systems that enable an effective strategy. I won’t spend time on specifics of tools out there as the topic is myriad, but solution types can broken into 5 basic categories: monitoring, management, engagement, analytics and influencer. We can save this subject for another time…

Let’s briefly cover the outputs which are unique in nature but overlap frequently:

CUSTOMER SEGMENTATION: Can be used to analyze the nature of conversations by individuals or groups. Practically speaking, discussions mentioning company name can be linked to brand awareness, while posts where specific product, tech specs or attributes are being discussed can be used to identify an individual as a prospective buyer worth nurturing, or an account worth exploring. Highly active individuals can more easily be clustered as Hi-Po targets with corresponding tailored marketing strategies.

COMPETITIVE AWARENESS: Useful when monitoring competitive product launch announcements to determine sentiment versus your offerings. Also allows for competitor campaign countermeasures – especially when said campaigns involve FUD or otherwise unfriendly information being used against your firm.

CAMPAIGN CURRENCY: A great way to garner near real-time insight into the effectiveness of media and marketing initiatives. Not only does it provide you with the ‘what-is & what-isn’t’ working feedback, you also gain the ability to monitor conversations as they evolve vis-a-vis brand comparison enabling you to improve on future campaigns. Properly utilizing this information enables companies to more adroitly tweak messaging to meet customer interests as they change throughout the lifecycle of their initiatives.

FOCUS GROUPS: This is kind of a no-brainer. From a psychological stand point, people in general don’t always give the most honest of feed back with respect to brands, campaigns or products when put in a room with a bunch of strangers. Plus conducting these on-site groups is expensive and a pain in the backside. The impersonal nature of the web however is a different story, it allows for much larger sample sizes and ensures that feedback (data) is more easily archived and used in a far more scientific manner.

Proper deployment of these ‘outputs’ with social media acting as the engine driving them allows for the identification of tangible metrics and actionable data with respect to the aforementioned 5 goals:

  1. Brand sentiment, buzz and growth are, as mentioned, the most immediate and directly affected by nearly any campaign; your ability to influence and enhance are greatly magnified via social channels.
  2. As campaigns and initiatives are now being more accurately monitored via live feed back, tweaks can be made to eliminate spend on inefficiencies. Very expectedly, through comparative study over time, firms begin to see content distribution costs decline as a result of shares, retweets and the like.
  3. Customer feedback – both solicited and unsolicited – can be viewed across multiple products, channels and regions; services can be proactively deployed (and communicated) to a broader audience before larger problems arise; specific individuals can be quickly identified for a more personal touch.
  4. Based on trends and aggregate voice, combined with competitive intelligence, companies can quickly respond to market needs from a product perspective, inform key demographics of their “Next Big Thing” should they so desire, and use inputs from the corresponding feedback to improve product/service enhancements as they are occurring.
  5. Whitespace accounts, high-potential buyers and at risk customers are more quickly identified and addressed.

It is therefore advisable that the traditional social media metrics be used versus the outputs on an individual basis, not in trying to create direct correlations to the goals one seeks to achieve. Companies are best served by endeavoring to create more tangible links (KPIs) from the outputs to those goals instead. By doing this your social media initiatives will net far more benefit to your organization as a whole.

So in closing, be patient, stay focused on your outputs and not the minutiae of the metrics. By moving away from gauging success based purely on tactical, easily counted data points, and redirecting your energy to building outputs that link to your goals, you will right your “vehicle” and start driving on the correct side of the road.

Spoiler alert: They make it home for Thanksgiving dinner.

Two-Thirds of Global Competitive Strategies Will Require a 3rd Platform IT

IDC

New IDC PlanScape outlines framework for mature business-oriented service management strategy

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., January 28, 2015 – International Data Corporation (IDC) predicts that by 2016, 65% of global competitive strategies will require real-time 3rd Platform IT as a Service (ITaaS). The ability of CIOs and IT organizations to grasp how business wants services that serve actual business needs, not traditional IT components, is significantly altering the ways in which service management is defined as successful. A new report, IDC PlanScape: Accelerating IT’s Progress to Business Maturity (Doc #253401) offers clear guidance about the business justification for creating a more mature, business-oriented service management strategy.

  • ClicktoTweet:  65% of Global #CompetitiveStrategies Will Require #3rdPlatform #ITaaS by 2016 @IDC – #IDCPlanScape outlines framework

3rd Platform technologies are fundamentally altering how IT organizations function, how business is conducted, and how enterprises compete. This demands restructuring IT to deliver ITaaS 3rd Platform services that are focused on realizing the enterprises’ competitive strategies. The ability of IT to immediately achieve a maturing business focus within its strategic planning and execution process is now an imperative. In this IDC PlanScape study, IDC explores a planning framework that enables CIOs and IT organizations to prepare for and respond to these transformative 3rd Platform imperatives. Moreover, the document details the key stakeholders and their roles and responsibilities in creating a more mature, business-driven IT organization to deliver service innovation to customers.

Additional key findings from this PlanScape include the following:

  • Without question, maturing the IT business dimension requires the active participation of top IT management. Equally imperative is to ensure all stakeholders and beneficiaries of IT within the enterprise are kept abreast of the business dimension maturity process and actively solicited for feedback whenever possible.

Continue Reading…

 

CIO magazine Tech Poll: Tech Priorities 2015

 CIO magazine Tech Poll: Tech Priorities 2015

The CIO magazine Tech Poll: Tech Priorities study was conducted among heads of IT to gauge for the upcoming year which technology areas will be the focus of IT leaders and to measure the direction of spending within those categories.

Key findings include:

  • An increasing number of IT leaders say their tech budgets are rising in the coming year than in the past six years.
  • BI & analytics is the area of most increased spending with enterprises planning to increase this investment even more than SMBs.
  • Enterprises are further along in regard to technology implementations.
  • While organizations are primarily using traditional development methods and have minimal plans to implement DevOps, they do use a liaison between business units & the development team to facilitate communication.

Continue Reading…