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Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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The Largest Content Event Is Back!

Screen Shot 2014 03 11 at 11.26.58 AM The Largest Content Event Is Back!

Content Marketing World, the largest content marketing event on the planet, is coming back to the United States for a fourth year.

Content Marketing World is the one event where you can learn and network with the best and the brightest in the content marketing industry. You will leave with all the materials you need to take a content marketing strategy back to your team – and – to implement a content marketing plan that will grow your business and inspire your audience. Register today for the best price (and save)!

Already confirmed 2014 speakers include such brands as Kraft Foods, Microsoft, Facebook, SAP, Cisco Systems, Coca-Cola Braziland more than 100 content marketing experts from around the globe. SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Actor, Director, Producer Kevin Spacey to be closing keynote speaker.

Click here for Content Marketing World Fact Sheet

Innovation lessons from an industry pioneer

eMedia Vitals

Last week’s passing of Pat McGovern, founder of tech publisher IDG, feels like the end of an era. Over a span of five decades, McGovern brought a passionate spirit and a culture of innovation to B2B publishing – qualities that too often are absent from today’s B2B media companies.

I met with Pat a few times during my time at IDG from 2004 to 2006, and each interaction left an impression, similar to the times I spent with another tech publishing legend, Bill Ziff, who led IDG rival Ziff-Davis through the mid-1990s. Both were larger-than-life yet surprisingly humble leaders who balanced strong business instincts with a passion for journalism – and the people who produce it.

Here are three lessons B2B media leaders can (and should) take from McGovern’s approach to publishing.

Find & cultivate new markets

McGovern was a big thinker who saw great promise in emerging markets for technology news and information, not just in the U.S. but internationally. Just five years after launching Computerworld in the U.S. in 1967, McGovern launched Shukan Computer in Japan, kicking off a long string of global licensing deals and other partnerships that built IDG into a global powerhouse. In 1980, McGovern forged one of the first joint ventures in China by a U.S. business. In 1992, he established IDG Technology Ventures, one of the first venture capital firms in China.

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It’s here: Office for iPad

CITEworld

It’s finally here: Office for iPad.

Starting this morning, Office for iPad will be available for download in the App Store. It will include Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The app will be available at 11 a.m. PDT, Microsoft said.

The company made the announcement during an event in San Francisco.

In a demo, Microsoft executive Julia White showed off the new app offering a glimpse at the work Microsoft has done to make its Office apps touch friendly. “It’s unmistakably Word but it’s natural on the iPad,” she said.

The apps will be free for anyone to use to read and “present” Office content, she said. Users who have an Office 365 subscription will be able to create and edit Office files on their iPads, she said.

In an interesting twist, this touch friendly version of Office comes to iPad before Microsoft’s own products. White said that a touch-friendly version of Office would come to Windows next.

In one of his first big public appearances since taking over the helm, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said that the company’s goal is to be mobile first and cloud first, and to offer apps that people can use no matter what device they’re using.

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The CIO’s Role in the Internet of Things

CIO Dashboard

In our soon-to-be-released Digital IQ survey of over 1,400 business and technology executives, 20% of respondents say they plan to invest in sensors. We feel confident in predicting that the Internet of Things (IoT) or the Internet of Everything will finally begin to take off this year, as futurists have forecasted for years. What remains to be seen is whether or not CIOs will win their rightful place in product design planning and the development of business instrumentation strategy.

Slowly but surely businesses and governments will use sensors to digitize droves of everyday devices and extract infinite amounts of information and insights to gain a competitive edge and garner deeper relationships with customers. Here are a handful of examples we expect to materialize this year:

  • Mobile devices will interact with the digital data that surrounds them, giving users the benefits of a true digital assistant
  • Low cost sensors will track shopping traffic patterns to enable retailors to improve customer service, streamline operations and lower costs
  • Motion and weight sensors will direct drivers to open parking spaces
  • Manufacturers will track everything in their supply chains to streamline operations
  • City governments will use gunfire locators to sense when a gun is fired and notify authorities

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Adobe, Microsoft Push Security Updates

Krebs on Security, Brian Krebs

March 11, 2014

Adobe and Microsoft today each released software updates to fix serious security flaws in their products. Adobe pushed an update that plugs a pair of holes in its Flash Player software. Microsoft issued five updates, including one that addresses a zero-day vulnerability inInternet Explorer that attackers have been exploiting of late.

Microsoft’s five bulletins address 23 distinct security weaknesses in Microsoft Windows, Internet Explorer and Silverlight. The Internet Explorer patch is rated critical for virtually all supported versions of IE, and plugs at least 18 security holes, including a severe weakness in IE 9 and 10 that is already being exploited in targeted attacks.

Microsoft notes that the exploits targeting the IE bug seen so far appear to perform a check for the presence of Microsoft’s Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET); according to Microsoft, the exploits fail to proceed if EMET is detected. I’ve recommended EMET on several occasions, and would encourage any Windows users who haven’t yet deployed this tool to spend a few minutes reading this post and consider taking advantage of it to further harden their systems. The latest version — 4.1 — is available at this link and requires Microsoft’s .NET Framework 4 platform. For those of you who don’t mind beta-testing software, Microsoft has released a preview version of the next generation of EMET — EMET 5.0 Technical Preview.

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An intelligent look at the new generation of business intelligence

CITEworld

The biggest high-concept trends in technology right now — Big Data, the quantified self, the social graph — all have something in common. They’re all about taking huge amounts of data and making them into something that helps us tease out insight into our businesses, our selves, and our relationships. But for all the brilliant work done on the back-end that allows for ever-faster access of larger and larger chunks of data, it’s been hard to find tools that let you actually do anything with it.

That may finally be changing. A new breed of cloud-based data analytics product is on the rise, all of which take different routes to the same goal: Making better business intelligence (BI) available more quickly to a much broader range of business functions.

When it’s laid out in black and white like that, it seems pretty straightforward. But there are so many vendors on the market, all promising the same thing — better, faster, more actionable insights from all your data — that it becomes incredibly difficult to know exactly what you need. Here’s how to think about better intelligence.

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Technology innovation creating complex leadership dilemmas

Value Creator, Brian Vellmure

The growth of technological progress is outpacing our ability to keep up. Over the last few decades, we’ve witnessed the dynamics of Moore’s Law extend beyond microprocessors to storage costs, biotech applications, human genome processing, and just about anywhere where processing power plays a role in advancement. As more of our lives become digitally connected, we must ask ourselves what does this mean for our collective institutions? More specifically, how will they change? And at what pace? And, how will traditional roles and functions evolve with them?

One critically important thing to note about the pace of change of technology driven innovation is that it’sexponential. If the pace of progress continues on its current trajectory, there is a strong argument that we can expect to see the same amount of technological innovation and progress over the next 10 years as we’ve seen during the previous 100.

For perspective, in 1914 there was no such thing as a radio tuner. Band-aids did not exist. There was no tommy gun, no bubble gum, no frozen food. There were no polaroids, no jet engines, no ballpoint pens, and no helicopters. There had not yet been a world war, and Babe Ruth had not yet swung a bat in a Major League baseball game. In essence, through today’s lens, 1914 feels like just barely on this side of prehistoric. It was a different era – several eras ago.

So is it possible that 10 years from now, when my oldest son will be getting ready to graduate from high school, 2014 will feel like an era long gone, as we contemplate how we ever survived without hundreds of (yet to be created) things?

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IDG’s Pat McGovern, 1937-2014: Computer Publishing’s Man of Many Worlds

Time

March 20, 2014

The owner of PC World, Macworld and other publications spent 50 years helping the world be smarter about technology.

Patrick J. McGovern died yesterday at Stanford Hospital in Palo Alto, California. You probably don’t know his name.

But if you’re interested enough in technology to read about it in print or online, there’s a very good chance that you know one or more of the publications produced by International Data Group, the privately-held company he founded in February, 1964 and ran for the rest of his life. They included PC WorldMacworld,GameProInfoWorld, the Dummies books and many, many more.

I worked at IDG for 16 years and eventually spent a fair amount of time in Pat’s company. It’s standard practice when someone passes away to describe that person as an unforgettable character, but trust me on this: Pat was unforgettable.

He was deeply interested in the human brain and how it worked, a pursuit he turned into a major philanthropic effort when he and his wife Lore pledged $350 million to create and fund MIT’sMcGovern Institute for Brain Research. I’m not sure if I ever completely understood how Pat’s own brain operated, but it was fascinating to watch it in action. He was a dreamer, but one with a prodigious ability to crunch numbers. (During board meetings, he often seemed to be recalculating spreadsheets about matters such as subscription revenues in his head.)

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Amazon, Google, or Microsoft: Which free cloud service should I use?

CITEworld

Cloud platforms are a big investment. Giving them that credit card number is the start of what could be a long relationship and many tens of thousands of dollars. So it’s a good idea to try before you buy, and if you’re using the cloud as a departmental developmental solution, it’s an even better idea to find a service that won’t cost you a penny while you get your applications and services up to speed.

That makes it well worth your time to use the various trial, test, and low-volume cloud services out there. They’ve been available for some time — especially Google’s free tier for its App Engine platform-as-a-service — and Amazon has now joined the club with a free tier for test and development. Low cost and free services like these make particular sense for individuals and teams wanting to try building their own apps.

You might still need a credit card to get started, but it won’t get billed if you stay within the services limits; so don’t use too many resources, or forget about any time limits. And if it does get billed, you can quickly cancel the service and move on.

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The Customer: The Most Important Statistic in Marketing – Everything Else is Just Offensive Rebounds

IDC PMS4colorversion  The Customer: The Most Important Statistic in Marketing – Everything Else is Just Offensive Rebounds

Let’s start with a story that relates to marketing today. When my brother in-law was trying out for his high school basketball team, the coach sat all the players down at the end of one practice and asked them, “What is the most important statistic in all of basketball.” My brother in-law, quite confident his answer would be correct, raised his hand and answered “Points scored.” The coach stared at him for a few seconds and responded, “No. Offensive rebounds.” For those of you who are familiar with basketball, you know that is a ridiculous statement – while offensive rebounds are important, the final score determines the winner, and thus is inarguably, the most important statistic in basketball.

For marketing, the customer is the final score

Today in marketing we are in an exciting phase with so much change happening, but also so much opportunity. The current atmosphere is a scary proposition for some, yet energizing for others. This energy has brought enthusiasm to many areas within marketing that are touted as “the most important.” While areas like marketing technology, big data and analytics, and content marketing are INCREDIBLY important, ultimately, they are only a portion of marketing and not the full picture. In the end the most important “statistic” is the customer. The buyer ultimately judges and scores you, so remember, how well you provide value to your customer will determine whether you win or lose.
Highlighting this customer focus, in our 11th annual marketing barometer survey we asked over 75 senior level marketing executives to “compose a tweet on the future of marketing.” We then took those answers and created a word cloud (see above). Low and behold, the two largest words that came up were “Customer” and “Buyer”. These executives, whether intentional or not, understand that the customer/buyer will determine the final score. So remember, while different marketing practices may have incredibly important functions, in the overall game of business, they are all just offensive rebounds.