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How a mobile-first word processor could beat Word for iPad

CITEworld

Bret Taylor got the idea for a mobile-first word processor back when he was the CTO at Facebook, and launched the result, Quip, last summer. But that was before Microsoft really got into the game with a full-featured, touch-first version of Office for the iPad. So does that eliminate the need for products like Quip?

Not at all — the startup says it hasn’t seen any effect on demand at all. “It reflects the fact that people are less interested in typesetting words on a piece of 8.5 by 11 paper,” Taylor told CITEworld. “They did quite a good job on the software, it’s quite well crafted in my opinion. But it doesn’t change collaboration. You can’t have two people edit the same thing at the same time, you still have to go to email to edit anything. They brought PC software to a tablet but didn’t solve the fundamental problem people wanted to solve, which is more effective communications and collaboration.”

That’s the whole design principle behind Quip — it’s not just a word processor, it’s a new way of working with documents that takes full advantage of the way people work with mobile devices.

For example, explains Taylor, “When you share a Quip document, the first time they open it, you get a push notification on your phone.” Then you can open the same document and comment on it with them in real time; the comment stream appears in the left hand side of the app, right next to the document itself. “It’s like walked to the person’s desk and walked through it with them, you’re reading with them, they’re asking question. It changes dynamic. It’s much more informal.”

Taylor says that a lot of early Quip users have said it’s “faster” than using other word processors. “Not faster performance in a technical sense, but because they can expect a response immediately.”

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2014 Mobile Search Advertising Benchmark Report

Arin Software

Working with some of the world’s largest and most sophisticated advertisers, our research uncovered many interesting trends that highlight the increased value of mobile devices as a mission critical channel for advertisers.

Sampling the Marin Global Online Advertising Index, composed of advertisers who invest more than $6 billion in annualized ad spend on the Marin platform, we analyzed data from around the world to create this report.

Use this benchmark data to measure your current campaigns, or review it to help you plan entry into new markets.

The informative report includes 18 data charts covering important trends, including:

  • Increased competition, as cost-per-click on mobile devices rose at a much higher rate than that of the desktop
  • Improving performance, as mobile conversion rates climbed on tablets and smartphones showing consumers have become increasingly comfortable with mobile commerce
  • Mobile click through rate, cost per click, click share, spend share, and conversion rate by device type
  • Click share and spend share by region, featuring data from 13 countries, including USA, Eurozone, UK, Australia, China, Brazil and Japan

Click to get your copy of the white paper now

What’s The Point Of Multi-screen?

MediaPost

I have been writing about second screen before and the definition of what the first screen is and what it can do. Obviously, this topic becomes more interesting to me, now that I work for a company offering the sync between TV and 2nd screen, or TV and digital if you like. But this isn’t a sales pitch, rather an evaluation of what’s happening in the market.

Emarketer’s recent report confirms what many studies have shown over the past few months: our engagement with TV, particularly during the ad breaks, is moving from the TV screen to the mobile, tablet, laptop screens or even portable gaming devices. Interesting enough, though, this particular reports says, the engagement is primarily on the TV screen and not the mobile screen.

Again, this is the chicken-and-egg situation, as most things in digital, whether the main screen is the TV or the mobile one. I use the mobile screen as a synonym for “portable” screens. The study further suggests that when using predominately smartphones we are engaging more on searching the web than on social media. And of social media, sites like Facebook and Twitter seem to be on top, and it could be non-related to what’s happening on TV at all, e.g., no hashtag or show following or liking.

In many discussions, I found out that everyone knows of a correlation between TV and mobile screens. No one knows exactly what and how but, of course, knows there is one. I am not disclosing my secrets here if I say that those screens go hand in hand. We as a nation, as humans, engage more and more with our mobile devices. We use them to check our bank statements, our social status, our text messages, emails, forums, or search for ideas, order books or toys or groceries. The mobile is our daily device with wearable tech usage and usability growing to become connected to mobiles and monitoring us 24/7.

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Mobile Continues to Steal Share of US Adults’ Daily Time Spent with Media

eMarketer

In 2013, time spent with digital media among US adults surpassed time spent with TV for the first time—with mobile driving the shift. This year, that trend will continue, according to new figures from eMarketer, as time spent with mobile devices continues to grow much faster than usage of all other media.

US adults still spend considerably more time with TV than with any other single medium, and in 2014, they’ll be in front their televisions for an average of 4 hours 28 minutes per day, eMarketer estimates. That’s down from 2013, but by a mere 3 minutes.

Combining online and mobile devices, however, eMarketer expects US adults to spend 5 hours 46 minutes with digital media daily this year, increasing digital’s lead over television to well over 1 hour per day. Digital media, in our definition, includes all online, mobile and other non-mobile connected-device activities, such as video streamed through over-the-top services.

That increase is almost exclusively attributable to mobile. In 2014, US adults will spend 23.0% more time with mobile on an average day than in 2013, according to eMarketer’s forecast—and that’s led to mobile cannibalizing time spent with just about every other category. Even desktop time will drop this year, both in absolute terms and as a share of time spent with all media. Last year, mobile time (excluding voice calls) lined up evenly with time spent online on desktops and laptops, at 2 hours 19 minutes each. This year, mobile will pull far ahead, to 2 hours 51 minutes, vs. 2 hours 12 minutes spent online on PCs. Overall, TV will account for 36.5% of total time spent with media in 2014, compared with mobile at 23.3%, which is now firmly in second place.

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LinkedIn Hits 300M Users, Pushes Mobile Options

MediaPost

LinkedIn on Friday announced it has surpassed 300 million active members worldwide, up from 277 million at the end of 2013. The roughly 36% growth rate in the first quarter from a year ago is on par with 2013. The professional networking site said 67% of its users come from outside the U.S., with more than 100 million in the U.S.

“While this is an exciting moment, we still have a long way to go to realize our vision of creating economic opportunity for every one of the 3.3 billion people in the global workforce,” stated Deep Nishar, LinkedIn’s senior vice president of product & user experience, in a blog post.

Mobile has become a growing focus for LinkedIn in the last couple of years, as more users access the service on devices. Later this year, Nishar noted that LinkedIn will hit the point where more than half of its global traffic comes from mobile.

“Already, our members in dozens of locations, including Costa Rica, Malaysia, Singapore, Sweden, United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom, use LinkedIn more on their mobile devices than on their desktop computers,” he wrote.

Overall, the site each day gets an average of 15 million profile views, 1.45 million job views and 44,000 job applications in over 200 countries through mobile. As the company expands its mobile portfolio, with new releases such as its slideshare app, LinkedIn plans more strategic partnerships with major mobile players like Apple, Nokia and Samsung.

LinkedIn made a splash earlier this year with its push into China. In his post, Nishar said the goal now is to connect more than 140 million Chinese professionals with each other and the worldwide work force.

In a research note on Monday, however, analyst Michael Purcell of Stifel Nicolaus pointed out that LinkedIn still monetizes international users per member at one-third the rate of their U.S.-based counterparts. That translates to average revenue per user (ARPU) of $3.76 abroad versus $11.30 in the U.S.

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Reminder: Nobody Has a Clue How Many Wearable Devices Will Sell in 2018

Time.com

Even more than with most gadgets, this category’s future is shrouded in mystery

Jason Snell of Macworld thinks that the pundits who think it’s absolutely vital that Apple dive into the smartwatch market–such as analyst Trip Chowdhry, who predicts doom if the company doesn’t make a move by next month (!!!)–are a tad overexcited. Referencinganother post by iMore’s Rene Ritchie, Jason argues that smartphones are going to remain by far the biggest, most profitable category of gadget for years to come, even if they aren’t as much fun to talk about as a nascent field like wearables.

Jason and Rene are two of the smartest people who write about tech, and both of their pieces are well worth reading. I agree with most of what they say. But in his piece, Jason buttresses his skepticism by quoting some stats from research firm IDC, which is part of my former employer IDG:

IDC reported that in 2013, one billion smartphones were shipped, up 38 percent from the previous year. That’s a fast-growing market worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Meanwhile, on Thursday IDC predicted that the wearables market will reach 112 million units in 2018.

In other words, in four years the wearables market might grow to be one-tenth the size of today’s smartphone market—in units shipped. Presumably the average selling price of wearable items will be a fraction of that of smartphones, meaning the dollar value of the wearables market is even more minuscule compared to the smartphone market.

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For Facebook, Measuring Across Devices And Apps Is A Huge Focus

AdExchanger

Facebook is increasingly focused on connecting audiences across screens and channels, and helping clients measure those results.

Graham Mudd, the company’s director of advertising measurement for North America, described aspects of the company’s approach to AdExchanger at the IAB’s Mobile Marketplace conference.

“We believe the future of marketing is being able to find specific consumers based on what the publisher, advertiser or intermediary knows about the consumers,” Mudd said. “And [to do that] we need to move beyond panels and cookies to census-based measurements.”

Instead of relying on consumer panels, which Mudd said fail to provide the necessary scale to measure diverse audiences across channels, Facebook is focusing on a combination of CRM data and third-party data from companies like Datalogix, Acxiom and Epsilon to help clients enhance their measurement capabilities.

Mudd also confirmed that the new “people-based measurement capability” that Facebook ads product VP Brian Boland alluded to in an AdAge op-ed will include partnerships with other data providers, although he declined to name the providers.

Facebook uses Nielsen’s Online Campaign Ratings (OCR) and Datalogix to measure the effectiveness of ads on both Facebook and Instagram, even though the latter is positioned as a separate brand and service. The company does not however, target users with ads based on data collected from both Instagram and Facebook.

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Programmatic, mobile boost adspend

Warc

LONDON: Global advertising expenditure is forecast to grow steadily over the next three years, according to new data from ZenithOptimedia which also highlighted the growing impact of programmatic and mobile.

Figures in the media agency’s latest Advertising Expenditure Forecasts report show growth in adspend at 3.9% in 2013 but increasing to 5.5% in 2014, 5.8% in 2015 and 6.1% in 2016.

This year’s figures will be helped by a series of ‘semi-quadrennial’ events – the Winter Olympics, the football World Cup, and the mid-term elections in the US – as well as the eurozone finally turning the corner to achieve its first year of growth since 2010.

While growth in the eurozone is expected to be a modest 0.7%, that will change as more countries stabilise – Finland, Italy and Greece, for example, are behind the curve – and adspend growth will accelerate to 1.6% in 2015 and 1.7% in 2016.

ZenithOptimedia noted that television remained the dominant advertising medium, attracting 40% of spend in 2013, nearly twice that taken by the internet (21%), and would gain most from the semi-quadrennial events, growing 5.2% in 2014.

But the internet was by some distance the fastest-growing medium, up 16.2% in 2013 and forecast to increase at a similar annual rate (16%) for the next three years.

The fastest-growing sub-category was display (21%), which was predicted to overtake paid search (13%) in 2015.

Traditional display (banners and other standard formats) was growing at 16% a year, boosted by the revolution in programmatic buying, which, said ZenthOptimedia, provided agencies and advertisers with more control and better value from their trading. Social media (growing at 29% a year) and online video (23% a year) were also starting to benefit from programmatic buying.

The rapid adoption of smartphones and tablets was driving a boom in mobile advertising, projected to increase at an average of 50% a year between 2013 and 2016. In contrast, desktop internet advertising was slated to grow at an average of just 8% a year.

Over the same period, mobile’s share of the market was set to more than double, from 12.9% of internet expenditure and 2.7% of advertising across all media to 28.0% and 7.6% respectively. In doing so it would become bigger than radio, magazine or outdoor, making it the world’s fourth-largest medium.

The rise of mobile apps and the decline of the open web — a threat or an over-reaction?

Gigaom

As the use of mobile devices continues to climb, the use of dedicated apps is also increasing — but is this a natural evolution, or should we be worried about apps winning and the open web losing? Chris Dixon, a partner with venture-capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, argues in a recent blog post that we should be concerned, because it is creating a future in which the web becomes a “niche product,” and the dominant environment is one of proprietary walled gardens run by a couple of web giants — and that this is bad for innovation.

Dixon’s evidence consists in part of two recent charts: one is from the web analytics company comScore, and shows that mobile usage has overtaken desktop usage — an event that occurred in January of this year. The second chart is from Flurry, which tracks app usage, and it shows that apps account for the vast majority of time spent vs. the mobile web, an amount that Flurry says is still growing. I’ve combined the two charts into one (somewhat ugly) graphic below:

If apps are winning, is the web losing?

The implication of all this is obvious, says Dixon. Mobile is the future, and what wins on mobile will win the internet — and “right now, apps are winning and the web is losing.” Not only that, but Dixon argues that the problem is likely to get worse, as more companies realize that an app gives them much more control over the user experience than a website. And with less and less investment in making the web experience better on mobile, it will continue to deteriorate, which in turn will push users even further towards the use of apps.

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MOBILE VIDEO VIEWING INCREASED BY 700% BETWEEN 2011 AND 2013

Fast Company

TV is no longer just a box in the living room. Unless you haven’t been paying attention, you know it also includes smartphones and tablets, and a new report fromvideo services company Ooyala provides more evidence of that trend. By analyzing viewing data from 200 million people, the Global Video Index report found mobile and tablet viewing increased 719% from 2011 to 2013. In 2013 alone, the share of videos watched on mobile phones increased by 10 times.

The holiday season played a role in these shifting viewing habits. Not only were consumers watching product videos to learn about potential gifts, but many also received tablets and smartphones as presents, helping drive growth in December. Overall, mobile phones and tablets accounted for 26% of viewing by the end of December of 2013, up from 18% in October.

More than half of the time people spent watching on mobile devices was on videos that were 30 minutes or longer. However, it was connected TVs that engaged online viewers the longest, with 39% of people watching content more than an hour long.

Read more…