Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

Social Media Insider Summit

08/20/2014 - 08/23/2014 LAKE TAHOE CA

iMedia Agency Summit (Malaysia)

08/25/2014 - 08/27/2014 Kota Kinabalu Malaysia

The 6th annual Mobile World

08/28/2014 Seoul

iMedia Brand Summit (Australia)

09/01/2014 - 09/03/2014 Gold Coast Australia

iMedia Brand Summit (India)

09/03/2014 - 09/05/2014 Adao Waddo, Salcette India

Data+: Analyze, Predict, Monetize

09/07/2014 - 09/09/2014 Phoenix AZ

iMedia Brand Summit: Marketing in an Always-On World

09/07/2014 - 09/10/2014 Coronado CA

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

Video Insider Summit

09/14/2014 - 09/17/2014 Montauk NY

Ad Age Digital Conference San Francisco

09/16/2014 San Francisco CA

digital-media

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

UK: More Consumers Buy on Mobile

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 UK: More Consumers Buy on Mobile

According to a recent study by xAd and Telmetrics which looked at the mobile behaviors of 2,000 UK tablet and smartphone users, up to 46% of UK consumers now use mobile devices as their primary tool for purchase decision making, while one in four use mobile devices as their exclusive shopping research tool. From comparison shopping to looking up nearby store locations to searching for store contact info, consumers are doing more and more purchase research and general browsing on their mobile devices, even while at home with a computer nearby. In fact, according to the study, 60% of those surveyed reported being at home the last time they accessed their smartphones.

As consumers turn to mobile to meet their varying research needs, they are becoming more comfortable with these devices as a primary decision-making tool. Satisfaction with the information available on smartphones in particular increased 18% since last year’s study.  

Mobile Advertising Has a Bigger Influence on In-Store Purchases Than You May Expect

Retail was the most popular category for mobile purchases, with 35% of survey respondents completing their transactions on their mobile devices. However, the impact of increasing mobile commerce activity isn’t limited to on-device or even online behaviors. Of those surveyed, 31% reported visiting a physical store at some point during their mobile search process. The study showed that mobile devices are frequently being used to not only research products and services, but also to find nearby store locations and store contact info. Ultimately, 37% of study respondents completed their purchases offline, with 20% of Telecom and Insurance shoppers completing purchases via phone.

Most Consumers Are Open to Influence, But Make It Quick 

When first turning to their mobile devices, less than 20% of respondents knew exactly what they were looking for, making 80% completely open to purchase influence. Consumers are also expecting purchase gratification more quickly than they have in the past. Nearly 50% reported wanting to make their purchase within a day and 30% are looking to make a purchase within the hour (up 52% since 2013).

Competitive Pricing and Easy Access to Store Contact Info Are Biggest Purchase Drivers for Mobile Consumers

According to the study, three out of four UK consumers used their mobile devices for price comparison and 39% made a purchase because the product/service was the right price. Store proximity and easy access to contact info are also important factors. Over 50% of respondents expect to find a location within eight kilometers of their current location, underscoring the importance of accurate location data, while up to 40% of shoppers made phone calls to the businesses they searched.

Fore more blogs and research from IDG Connect, click here 

Majority of Latin America’s Smartphone Users Buy via Mobile

eMarketer

Where are smartphone users most likely to report purchasing products or services on their handsets? The answers may surprise you—especially the answer to the question, “Where aren’t they?”

176331 Majority of Latin Americas Smartphone Users Buy via Mobile

May 2014 polling by IDG Global Solutions found that 78% of smartphone users in Asia-Pacific had made a mobile commerce purchase, compared with 70% in North America. It makes some sense that a relatively less developed ecommerce market would place high according to this metric, however: Overall, smartphone penetration in Asia-Pacific is relatively low, meaning the share of such users who have made a purchase is likely to be high. Across a broader swathe of the population, mcommerce penetration would look lower.

Latin America is another standout by this metric—an outright majority of smartphone users reported making a purchase. That compares with significantly lower penetration rates across the population of consumers and internet users who make ecommerce purchases at all (including on the desktop).

And while Latin America is behind the Middle East and Africa—another region where smartphone penetration reaches a fairly small share of the overall population, and smartphone users are therefore a select and advanced portion of the market—it placed ahead of both Eastern and Western Europe, places where smartphone penetration is higher, according to eMarketer’s estimates.

With Year-on-Year Growth of 84% in the Second Quarter, India Smartphone Market Still Has Immense Potential, Says IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 300x99 With Year on Year Growth of 84% in the Second Quarter, India Smartphone Market Still Has Immense Potential, Says IDC

The smartphone market in India has maintained its growth impetus with smartphone shipments achieving year-on-year growth of 84% in Q2 2014 and a quarter-over-quarter growth of 11%. The potential for future growth in the smartphone market remains quite high as 71% of the market continues to be on feature phones.

According to International Data Corporation (IDC), the overall India mobile phone market stood at 63.21 million units in Q2 2014, a 5% increase over Q1 2014. The quarter-over-quarter growth can be attributed to both product categories (i.e. smartphones and feature phones).  Back-to-back volume growth in the smartphone market is also being noted due to the re-defined, low-price smartphone models and continuous migration from feature phones to smartphones.

The Indian smartphone market grew by 84% year-on-year in Q2 2014. According to IDC Asia Pacific Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker (excluding Japan),vendors shipped a total of 18.42 million Smartphones in Q2 2014 compared to 10.02 million in the same period of 2013. The sub-$200 category of the smartphone market is increasing in terms of new shipment share as the contribution from this category stood at 81% in Q2 2014. With the influx of Chinese vendors and Mozilla’s plans to enter the smartphone category at the $50 price level, the low-end segment of the smartphone market will become crucial in the coming quarters.

The shipment of “Phablets” (5.5 inch – 6.99 inch screen size Smartphone) in Q2 2014 was noted to be 5.4% of the overall smartphone segment. The phablet category grew by 20% quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) in terms of sheer volume. More than half of the phablets shipped were in the under-$250 price band and Indian vendors are dominant in the noted price segment.

Jaideep Mehta, Vice President and General Manager – South Asia, IDC says, “While Samsung has held on to its leadership position in the market, it is noteworthy that Micromax is growing faster. Samsung needs to continue to address the low-end of the market aggressively, and also needs a blockbuster product at the high end to regain momentum. Given the current growth rates, there is a real possibility of seeing vendor positions change in the remaining quarters this year.”

“IDC observes that a new entry level price point is being breached by the Indian home grown vendors every quarter. These devices are not equipped with high end specifications and RAM is typically 256 MB. This ultra low cost segment may not sound a viable option to the repeat buyers, but it works well on the targeted segment,” says Karan Thakkar Senior Market Analyst at IDC India.

Q2 2014 has been an exciting quarter for the players in the mobile phone market.  Among the top five vendors, Micromax and Lava were the only ones to have outstripped the market growth. The former grew by 18% and the latter by 54% in the overall phone business.  Micromax not only toppled Nokia to clinch the number 2 spot, but also created a gap between the second and third spot.

Continue reading

Ever Wonder Why Consumers Don’t Click on Mobile Ads?

eMarketer

Mobile users see a decent amount of ads: March 2014 polling by Nielsen for xAd and Telmetrics found that 70% of US adults who used smartphones, tablets or both had encountered mobile ads in the past month. Of course, getting an ad in front of a target doesn’t guarantee interaction, and the majority of mobile device users hadn’t clicked on an advertisement in the month leading up to polling. Smartphone owners were slightly more likely to click on a mobile ad, with 43% saying they had, compared with 37% of those with tablets.

177395 Ever Wonder Why Consumers Dont Click on Mobile Ads?

March 2014 research by Survey Sampling International (SSI) for Adobe found that the platform used to serve mobile ads also made a difference in interaction. While apps claim far more time spent with mobile, mobile device users in North America were more likely to click on mobile website ads. More than one-third had done so in the past three months, compared with 26% who had interacted with an in-app mobile ad. Mobile devices used by respondents in this study included ereaders, mobile phones, smartphones, tablets and wearable devices.

But what about ads that don’t get clicked on? How can advertisers tweak them to drive more interaction? According to xAd and Telmetrics, the most popular reason smartphone and tablet users hadn’t clicked on mobile ads in the past month was because they just weren’t interested in the offering, cited by 47% and 43%, respectively—and suggesting advertisers may need to amp up targeting efforts. Irrelevant advertisements and users simply ignoring them ranked second and third.

Click to see more

Only 16pc of businesses have an enterprise-led mobile strategy: report

Mobile Marketer

While mobile usage in the United States is only expected to rise within the next few years, it is surprising that a mere 16 percent of businesses are leading their enterprise strategies with mobile-first initiatives, according to a recent report from Kony.
Sponsored by mobile development platform solutions company Kony and executed by research firm International Data Corporation, the survey shows a huge support and success for businesses that have deployed mobile initiatives rather than business unit-led or departmental-led approaches. Forthe survey, more than 400 IT decision makers were interviewed about their marketing strategies.
“In the past, mobile projects used to be fairly time and resource extensive, owing to the fact that companies needed to make infrastructure investments and write to each native OS platform,” said Stacy Crook, research director of mobile enterprise at IDC, Boston.
Why not?
For this particular survey, enterprises with no less than 1,000 employees participated. The survey participants were evenly split across a few company size buckets, such as 1000-2499 employees, 2500-4999 employees or 5000-9999 employees, with a small bias towards the largest company size bucket, such as more than 10,000 employees, where companies in that bucket provided 30 percent of responses.  Therefore, most of the companies surveyed are in an appropriate financial situation to embark upon mobility projects.
While cost tends to be a factor with any new IT initiative, it was not the top concern per survey responses. The survey asked, “Which of the following mobile deployment issues has your organization experienced?”
The top five responses were security and compliance issues, issues in linking mobile platforms to existing databases, version control issues between mobile operating systems, applications and/or enterprise applications, time constraints and cost overruns or budget issues.
Nearly 50 percent of organizations that have executed mobile solutions have seen an improvement in overall decision making, efficiency, customer interaction, savings in cost and increased revenue, which proves that the integration of mobile is no longer a good idea but in fact crucial.
About 31 percent of surveyed companies have a comprehensive mobile technical staff in place with additional external support, which another 30 percent of companies have a mobile development and architect group.
Today’s possibilities
The advancement of technology is working in the favor of big businesses. Unlike years before, implementing mobile now leads to fewer obstacles and takes less time.
“Mobile projects in the past used to take months to develop and implement, but now with new cloud-based mobile application technology, businesses are able to design and develop enterprise mobile applications in a matter of hours,” said Dave Shirk, CMO atKony, Inc., Dallas. “There are many factors that enterprises need to consider in order to have an enterprise-led mobile strategy, including security and compliance requirements, and linking mobile platforms with existing databases and systems so the application can get real-time access to the relevant data or information.
“Also, another huge inhibitor is that mobile technology keeps changing with new updates in operating systems, devices and enterprise applications, which can get overwhelming. That’s why Kony’s open and standards-based, integrated platform was designed to simplify the mobile application development process for businesses.”
While the survey showed 41 percent of companies have a particular budget for enterprise-wide mobile endeavors, the issue of cost is fading away, and these companies have the highest allowance for mobile budget, which tends to provide for strategic investments in mobile staff or to augment that staff with outside support.
“The growing availability of cloud platforms that allow companies to develop native, web, or hybrid applications in a streamlined manner can help alleviate both concerns,” IDC’ Ms. Crook said.

People Are Pretty Much Glued to Technology 24/7

eMarketer

Remember when reading an email during a meeting was a big no-no? Or when texting on a date could get you dumped? Or when you could walk into a room and not see a mobile phone in everyone’s hand? Based on polling by CivicScience, those days are mostly gone.

177185 People Are Pretty Much Glued to Technology 24/7

July 2014 research found that 60% of US internet users were almost always connected. Fully 43% never unplugged from all personal technology, such as audio players, ereaders, laptops and computers, mobile phones, tablets, and TV, and 17% only took a break a few times a year. Surprisingly, 20% of respondents did manage to unplug daily.

CivicScience found that gender and income didn’t play major roles in whether or not consumers unplugged, but age did in some respects, with 18- to 24-year-olds the most likely to say they never unplugged (53%) and 23% of respondents ages 18 to 44 taking a break from personal technology a few times a year. However, both ends of the age spectrum were almost just as likely to unplug daily, with 24% of those younger than 18 and 27% of adults 55 and older citing this frequency.

Unsurprisingly, smartphones had an influence on how often consumers unplugged. Respondents who owned smartphones were 34% more likely than smartphone non-users to never pause their love affair with personal technology. Considering that eMarketer expects the majority (51.4%) of US consumers to use a smartphone at least monthly this year—and 66.9% to do so in 2018—it looks like unplugging will continue to fade out.

Marketers Have Something Bad to Say About Mobile Search

eMarketer

As mobile continues to take over the world, advertisers have followed consumers to the devices where they spend the most time. But according to a Q2 2014 study by Kenshoo, both mobile search spending and performance have room for growth.

177179 Marketers Have Something Bad to Say About Mobile Search

The research looked at 85 search marketing professionals worldwide (both in-house and agency) who were actively using Google Enhanced Campaigns and found that 53% of respondents allocated between just 5% and 20% of their total paid search ad spending to mobile, while nearly half of that percentage (26%) put between 21% and 40% of their search budgets toward mobile.

The top goals of mobile paid search were online traffic and direct sales, each cited by 33% of search marketers around the globe. Meanwhile, just 9% hoped to generate phone calls, 4% wanted to drive in-store traffic, and 2% hoped to spur app installs.

177182 Marketers Have Something Bad to Say About Mobile Search

Respondents weren’t overly enthusiastic about mobile paid search’s results. Nearly two-thirds said that mobile search performed worse than desktop, with the majority of that group saying it was much worse. Meanwhile, 20% said mobile search was slightly better than desktop, while just 2% reported it being much better.

Still, US search marketers are indeed moving their dollars to mobile. eMarketer estimates that US mobile search ad spending will grow a whopping 82.3% this year to reach $9.02 billion. This works out to 50.9% of all spending on mobile ads and 39.5% of total search ad investments.

Samsung Disappointing Numbers Will Be Worse With Apple’s Next iPhone Release

The Street

Samsung’s dismal quarterly performance, leading to a 25% decline in profits, are likely to get worse before they get better, as the company warned that the second half of the year would be “a challenge” and Apple (AAPL_) is likely to refresh its iPhone later, starting in Sept.

That challenge is coming not only from Apple’s iPhones at the top-end of the smartphonebusiness, but from mid and low-priced handsets made by small manufacturers and selling well in China and the world’s emerging markets.

IDC analyst Ramon Llamas says Samsung is really “feeling the pressure from every area.” In a phone interview, Llamas said Samsung is the top manufacturer and it’s also “the biggest target.” He thinks Samsung’s problems are three-fold: it’s struggling in the low-end marketplace, competitors such as LG and Motorola are currently offering high-quality alternatives and that “the writing is on the wall” for Samsung once Apple introduces its larger-screen models.

Read More: iPhone 6 Coming at Right Time as World Moves to Large Smartphones

Samsung announced a net profit of $6.1 billion in the second quarter,  down from $7.6 billion in the year ago quarter. Operating profits of $7.02 billion fell 15% sequentially, and 25% from the same quarter last year.

Nick Spencer of ABI Research thinks Samsung is “caught in the middle ground” between low-cost Chinese phones and the iPhone.  In an email, Spencer added, “Samsung has also always relied on supply chain excellence (scale and manufacturing its own components) to allow it to create dozens of different models to satisfy every conceivable price point, form factor and regional taste. This is inefficient, which is fine when you have margin to play with and have the lowest manufacturing costs, but both of these are being squeezed by Chinese manufacturers.”

For the past few years, Samsung’s distinct marketing advantage has been larger smartphone screens than its competition, but that may soon change. Apple is expected to announce two new iPhones that should challenge Samsung’s main talking point, one with a reported 4.7-inch screen rivaling the Galaxy S5, and the other is said to sport a 5.5-inch display. Apple recently reported fiscal third-quarter results, which saw the company ship 35.2 million iPhones. According to analysts surveyed by Thomson Reuters, Samsung’s problems will continue into the second half of this year. Analysts polled expect Samsung to see a 7% revenue decline in profits and an EPS drop of 14% in the third quarter and a slightly better (-2% revenue and -3% EPS) in the fourth quarter.

Samsung has yet to respond to a request for comment.

Early in July, Samsung warned its second quarter would disappoint blaming a number of factors – a slowdown in growth for the entire smartphone industry, increased competition at the high and low ends of the smartphone spectrum, a strengthening home currency in relationship to the US dollar and the second quarter being an historically slow period.

Continue reading…

Screen Stacking Goes Mainstream [infographic]

Daily Infographic

If you’re anything like me, you probably watch TV with at least one other device in your hand or by your side. (How else are you going to Google that super hot actor you’re certain you’ve seen in something else?) Basically, I’m a serial screen-stacker. My laptop, tablet, cell phone, or any combination of the three is usually within arm’s reach when I’m binge watching TV shows on Netflix. Why can’t I just enjoy my TV shows without distractions? Well, I can’t not be connected. Trust me, I’ve tried.

Then again, I’m pretty much guilty of doing everything listed on today’s infographic, although I might spend more than five hours a day online. Luckily, I know I’m not the only screen-stacker around. Thirty-seven percent of U.S. consumers admit to using multiple devices at the same time. While you might spend your time playing Candy Crush when I’m checking out my Instagram feed, neither of us are devoting our full attention to any one thing. And for marketers who are trying to target a specific audience with a commercial about their brand, our divided attention can be a problem.

So what’s the solution? Well, brands can build consistency by being available across multiple platforms, as well as understanding their connected audience. According to TNS Global‘s Connected Life quiz, I’m a leader. Whoo! I can’t argue with my results because of how much I rely on the Internet and social media during my day. So if you’re interested in finding out just what type of connected life you live, click the link below to take the quiz for yourself!

[TNS Global]

TNS CL infographic 640x3948 Screen Stacking Goes Mainstream [infographic]

Study: Consumers Increasingly Receptive to Mobile Ads

Street Fight

Over the past few years, it hasn’t been uncommon to hear proclamations that the “year of mobile” is finally nigh — that the platform with so much promise would finally hit a tipping point and begin to dominate in terms of brands’ ad spending. It’s unclear if we’ve reached that point, exactly, for advertisers, but consumer engagement with mobile does appear to have gone mainstream.

A new study released by xAd and Telmetrics finds that consumer engagement with mobile ads has increased dramatically over the past few years. In the two companies’ 3rd Annual U.S. Mobile Path-to-Purchase study, conducted by Nielsen, nearly 50% of mobile shoppers said that they found mobile ads informative/helpful — up from 22% in 2013. In addition, 40% of respondents reported clicking on mobile ads, and nearly half of those said they went on to take secondary actions (like viewing a website or searching for additional information).

Telmetrics CEO Bill Dinan said that the results of the study over several years indicate a real evolution in the way that consumers engage with their devices as mobile becomes more and more mainstream as an advertising platform.

“People are becoming more receptive to mobile ad content — whether it’s in a website, or in an app,” said Dinan. “People are becoming more used to ads being there. People are becoming more engaged with ads. Publishers are trying to figure out how to make ads more relevant. And as a result, we’re seeing more of these secondary actions.”

The secondary actions appear to be a key indicator of purchase intent for mobile shoppers.  The study found that consumers who took these kinds of actions after clicking on an ad were likely looking to convert quickly and find nearby businesses to satisfy what they were looking for — 50% wanted to make a purchase within an hour, and 70% went on to make the purchase. These actions are all very local — with 67% of these shoppers looking for a business within five miles to satisfy their needs, and 18% looking for a location within one mile.

Dinan said that with engagement established, more advanced metrics are now needed to understand mobile’s effectiveness in driving purchases: “We’ve figured out how to get people engaged, the next part is for these publishers and these agencies to make sure they can capture the right and relevant metrics to leverage the engagement.”

The study seems to indicate that the increasing relevance of ads is a big factor in spurring engagement. Over 40% of mobile users in the study said they clicked on an ad because it was relevant to their interests or purchase research. Coupons and discounts were big drivers of engagement, and more than 50% of respondents said location was an important factor to an ad’s relevance, up sharply over two years.

According to Dinan, the distinction that many marketers make between mobile and desktop is starting to fall away. “Mobile is digital, digital is mobile — that’s the point we’re at now,” he said. “The mobile device is my portal to my day; my digital sherpa; my guide to life.”