Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

2015 International CES

01/06/2015 - 01/09/2015 Las Vegas Nevada

digital-media

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

Global Social Case Study: C Level Spain LinkedIn Group

DIRECTIVOS DE ESPANA C LEVEL EXECUTIVES LINKEDIN GROUP
ENHANCED COMMUNITY THREADING – SPAIN

GOAL:

IBM NEEDED TO GET 300 ATTENDEES WITHIN ONE WEEK OF THEIR DIRECTIVOS DE ESPANA EVENT

EXECUTION:

IDG SENT EMAIL PROMOTIONS LINKING TO THE DIRECTIVOS DE ESPANA LINKEDIN GROUP AND POSTED POLLS/QUESTIONS TO THE GROUP WEEKLY TO DRIVE ENGAGEMENT

RESULTS:

Screen Shot 2014 11 18 at 6.23.25 PM Global Social Case Study: C Level Spain LinkedIn Group

For more about Enhanced Community Threading…. 

 

 

12 Shocking Social Media Horror Stories

CITEworld

Horrible Social Media Misfires

Just in time for Halloween, here are 12 scary, shocking, horrifying and just plainhorrible social media misfires from the past year. We’re talking big brands — DiGiorno Pizza, J. P. Morgan, US Airways — making even bigger mistakes or, for one reason or another, catching beatings on social media sites.

To build our house of social media horrors, we asked the digital marketing community for input. We asked about the social media faux pas they remember most vividly, and the lessons we can learn from the blunders. We also found a few examples in blogs and articles.

4AutoInsuranceQuote.com’s Paul Walker Tweets

On Nov. 30, 2013, actor Paul Walker, of “Fast & Furious” fame, died in a horrific car crash. The next day, 4AutoInsuranceQuote.com repeatedly tweeted that it hoped Walker had car insurance.

The company even tweeted directly to Walker’s Twitter handle (@RealPaulWalker): “Yo Paul did u have auto insurance for that crash? Hope so.” The company also tweeted the car insurance question to mainstream news outlets such as Time, “which of course further fueled the public outrage and social media backlash,” says David Erickson, vice president of online marketing, Karwoski & Courage. “This is an example of horrible judgment, and the only way to prevent something like this is to ensure the people running your social media accounts are decent human beings.”

U.S. Airways’ Pornographic Tweet

“The pornographic U.S. Airways tweet from April 2014 will go down in infamy and haunt the dreams of social media professionals for years to come,” says Dee Anna McPherson, vice president of marketing, Hootsuite.

A link to a salacious picture posted on the airline’s Twitter account quickly went viral. CNN and other media outlets reported on it. “U.S. Airways stood by the employee responsible for the explicit blunder, citing it as an honest mistake,” says McPherson. “It was a brave choice, considering the gaffe dominated Internet conversation for about a week, and the brand led trending Twitter conversations for days. While it may certainly have been a simple mistake, it underscores the need for care and process when posting to social.”

View the full slideshow

Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents say

PCworld

Internet companies have run amok with our personal data, and people aren’t entirely sure what to do about it, judging from the results of a new survey.

More than 90 percent of Americans feel they’ve lost control over how their personal information is collected and used by companies, particularly for advertising purposes, according to the results of a survey by the Pew Research Center, published Wednesday.

Eighty percent expressed concern over how third parties like advertisers accessed the data they share on social media sites. Pew did not gather the names of which sites specifically respondents meant, but you could likely venture a guess.

The survey, which polled 607 adults online, was the Washington, D.C.-based think tank’s first in a series to tackle Americans’ views toward surveilance 100042486 medium Control over personal info nearly dead, Pew survey respondents sayprivacy after the leaks around government surveillance made by Edward Snowden last year.

The majority of respondents did indeed say that people should be concerned about whether the government is listening in on their phone calls, or viewing their online communications and other sensitive data.

But beyond government surveillance, the findings also reflect people’s attitudes amid the increasing sophistication by which Internet companies leverage people’s data for advertising.

“It’s a bundle of concerns,” said Lee Rainie, one of Pew’s lead researchers on the project, in an interview. “It’s partly surveillance, it’s partly tracking, and this generalized sense that I’m losing control of my identity and my data,” he said.

The constant flood of stories related to data breaches, whether it’s at Target, Snapchat, or P.F. Chang’s, don’t help either.

But voicing concern about the level of access companies, governments and other groups have to data is one thing; taking action in response is another.

Some respondents said they have taken actions to protect their privacy, like using a pseudonym, but a majority of respondents agreed that achieving anonymity online is not possible.

People’s concerns around privacy might be part of the trade-off in using a free service. Some 55 percent of respondents said they were willing to share “some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free.”

Continue reading… 

Facebook will be mostly video in 5 years, Zuckerberg says

IDG News Service

If you think your Facebook feed has a lot of video now, just wait.

“In five years, most of [Facebook] will be video,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday during the company’s first community town hall, in which he took questions from the public on a range of topics.

He was responding to a question about whether the growing number of photos uploaded to Facebook is putting a drag on its infrastructure. But Facebook’s data centers have it covered, he said. The real challenge is improving the infrastructure to allow for more rich media like video in people’s feeds.

Zuckerberg took questions from a group of users who were invited to its headquarters in Menlo Park, California, and people also submitted questions online.

One of the most popular online question was why Facebook forced users to download its Messenger app for mobile.

The 30-year-old acknowledged not everyone was thrilled with the change.

“Asking everyone in our community to install another app is a big ask,” he said. But Facebook thought it could provide a better, faster messaging product if it split it off from its own app.

“We really believe this is a better experience,” Zuckerberg said.

One user in the audience asked him if Facebook is losing its charm or becoming boring.

The question of Facebook losing its “cool” gets raised from time to time, Zuckerberg said, but “my goal was never to make Facebook cool,” he said. Instead, he wants it to be a helpful service that just works.

Another asked why he always seems wear the same t-shirts and hoodies. Zuckerberg said he wants to spend as much time as possible on things that matter, like how to build products, even if it means thinking less about what he wears.

“Steve Jobs had the same approach,” he said.

View the original article and related links… 

IDG’s Social Media Marketing Success Story

Media Shepard

IDG worked with Samsung late last year to promote the company’s 10.1 Galaxy Note tablet. For Samsung, the goals were clear: promote the product during the holiday season in order to reach the campaign’s target business audience. IDG’s job was to leverage its industry contacts and brand following to create awareness and engagement.

That job fell to Colin Browning, marketing services director at IDG, who heads the Performance Marketing group within IDG Strategic Marketing Services. Browning’s team is responsible for the implementation, management, analysis, and optimization of social media and lead generation programs for clients.

mediaShepherd asked Browning to explain how IDG designed and implemented an effective B2B social media campaign: platforms used, specific approaches, goals, strategies and results.

mediaShepherd: What were the goals of the campaign? How were you defining “success” both for your client and IDG?

Colin Browning: The overall campaign goal was to increase the IT leadership’s awareness of Samsung’s new 10.1 inch tablet as a superior device for use in the workplace. For the social component we wanted to get the target audience discussing the broader advantages and flexibility of tablets while including Samsung’s messaging.

mS: There is often a fine line between promotional and valuable content, especially with custom marketing campaigns. How did you ensure that you would be pushing out valuable content to your audiences to facilitate real engagement? (Did the survey(s) you conducted play a role in this?)

CB: The program content, including the Twitter chat topics, were designed to be thought leadership based. While these are all informative pieces and conversations, they were also aligned to the key value propositions of the Samsung Tablet. This enabled us to have broader audience conversations about the use of the tablet in the workplace and what IT’s needs are, without coming across as overly promotional.

Continue reading…

On the hunt for attention, media outlets gamify the news

Digiday

And now, for their next reader-engagement trick, publishers are taking a few lessons from your PlayStation.

The world of video games is coming to the news. While publishers are used to telling stories in text and, recently, in video, some are looking to add a dose of interactivity to their news in an effort to attract more readers and keep them around longer.

Last week, Al Jazeera launched “Pirate Fishing,” an online game that puts players in the role of a journalist as he investigates an illegal fishing trade. Players, who start as “junior researchers” get points by watching videos and filing clips in their notebooks, helping them earn “senior reporter” positions and ” specialist badges.” The game was based of an Al Jazeera video series originally published in 2012.

Read on…

With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data

The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook built itself into the No. 2 digital advertising platform in the world by analyzing the vast amount of data it had on each of its 1.3 billion users to sell individually targeted ads on its social network.

Now it is going to take those targeted ads to the rest of the Internet, mounting its most direct challenge yet to Google, the leader in digital advertising with nearly one-third of the global market.

On Monday, Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps.

“We are bringing all of the people-based marketing functions that marketers are used to doing on Facebook and allowing them to do that across the web,” David Jakubowski, the company’s head of advertising technology, said in an interview.

Continue reading…

What happens when you combine WhatsApp with YouTube

Digiday

The next frontier for media might just be messaging.

WhatsApp reached 600 million monthly active users in August, six months after Facebook paid $19 billion for the massively popular messaging app. Competitors Line, WeChat and Viber have also experienced impressive growth in recent months.

Montreal-based 5by plans to introduce its own messaging product next week, with one key difference from those aforementioned apps: Its new platform lies at the nexus between messaging and Web video.

“People do not want to broadcast everything on Facebook; they just want to easily send things to people they care about,” 5by CEO Greg Isenberg told Digiday. “We leverage this behavior to make it easier for people to find, share and discuss videos.”

Read on…

Africa’s Digital Future Remains Bright Despite Myriad Challenges

IDC PMS4colorversion no shadow 300x98  Africas Digital Future Remains Bright Despite Myriad Challenges

Spurred by increased infrastructural investments, improved connectivity and affordability, positive government interventions, and the spread of mobility, the African digital media landscape is rapidly evolving, according to global IT market intelligence firm International Data Corporation (IDC). Referencing its ‘Assessment and Outlook of the Digital Media Ecosystem in Africa’ report, IDC today said the future remains bright for the continent, although key challenges such as low propensity to pay for applications and content as well as lack of ubiquitous high speed broadband infrastructure continue to hamper progress and will take a while to resolve.

“The digital picture in Africa is changing rapidly,” says Leonard Kore, a research analyst for telecommunications and media at IDC East Africa. “Internet penetration is on the rise, buoyed by increased infrastructure investments, while the landing of undersea fiber-optic cables connecting Africa to the rest of the world has greatly reduced transmission time and costs while increasing bandwidth capacity. Although only an estimated 19% of the continent’s 1 billion population is online, this situation is expected to improve as investments in infrastructure continue to gain momentum; this includes 2G and 3G network infrastructure expansion and fiber to the x (FTTx).”

Mobile usage has had a transformative impact in Africa. Other key factors include the high digital appetite for social media and the impending digital migration, while other sectors such as ecommerce have had a tough time gaining traction. The digital disruption has significantly changed consumer behavior, and service usage patterns have altered as a result, with consumers now seeking devices with intuitive interfaces, content-rich applications, and faster connectivity capabilities as they spend more time online.

Continue reading…

New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

This in spite of tech marketing turmoil and transformation, as half of tech companies replaced CMO in last 24 months

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. – The 12th Annual Tech Marketing Benchmark Study from the International Data Corporation (IDCCMO Advisory Service finds that marketing budgets among the 101 technology companies surveyed will increase by an average of 3.5% in 2014. Those same companies expect a revenue increase of 3.7% for the same period. Despite this momentum, the CMO role remains very fluid as marketing organizations attempt to reinvent their capabilities and effectiveness in a new era of marketing. In a related study, IDC finds that 51% of tech CMO’s have been in their position for fewer than two years.

Two-thirds of the companies surveyed by IDC will increase their marketing budgets in 2014 while only 20% of the companies will decrease their marketing budgets with the remainder indicating no change in budget levels. Notably, companies with a high percentage of 3rd Platform products (cloud, social, mobile and Big Data and analytics) will receive marketing budget increases upwards of five times that of the average tech company, increasing their budgets 10-20% year over year.

“For the first time in eight years, IDC is seeing that marketing budgets are increasing at about the same rate as revenues. This is positive news for tech marketers and also a clear indication that the C-suite is ready to put additional marketing investment up against more promising business prospects,” saidSam Melnick, Senior Research Analyst, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, both the CMO and CEO must understand that momentum is being driven by success in 3rd Platform solution areas. To continue this growth, executives must continue to invest to be competitive in these high-upside segments.”

“We examined 152 tech companies with a current CMO in place and found that 77, just over half, have replaced their CMO in the last 24 months – an astonishing rate of change. CMOs must own the digital disruption of buyer experience for their companies. Those CMOs able to rise to the challenge will be provided more resources and given more power. The unprepared will be replaced,” said Kathleen Schaub, Vice President, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, tech CEOs must also wake up to the impact marketing now wields over revenue and reputation. It’s their job to pick the right person for today’s challenges. To get CMO selection right means the CEO needs to understand and get closer to marketing.”

The 12th annual 2014 Tech Marketing Benchmark Study was recently completed by IDC’s CMO Advisory Service and seeks to capture the full marketing spend and marketing headcount allocations of global companies within the technology sector. The research effort surveyed 101 companies, with the average company’s revenue surpassing $7 billion. IDC’s 2015 Marketing Investment Planner containing study details will be published in November and will be available on IDC.com. In a parallel study, the CMO Advisory Service studied 152 tech companies ranging from $50 million to $100 billion in revenue to observe their CMO tenure.

About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and business strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. In 2014, IDC celebrates its 50th anniversary of providing strategic insights to help clients achieve their key business objectives. IDC is a subsidiary of IDG, the world’s leading technology media, research, and events company. You can learn more about IDC by visiting www.idc.com. Follow IDC on Twitter at @IDC.

Click here to read the original article