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CIO Tech Poll: Economic Outlook Reveals IT Budget Growth, Increased Spending on New IT Projects & IT Talent Concerns

 CIO Tech Poll: Economic Outlook Reveals IT Budget Growth, Increased Spending on New IT Projects & IT Talent Concerns

Increased Focus on External Customer Continues in Upcoming Year

Framingham, Mass. – May 27, 2015 – IDG’s CIO—the executive-level IT media brand providing insight into business technology leadership— reveals the CIO Tech Poll: IT Economic Outlook results for May 2015. The research indicates that half of organizations (50%) are increasing IT budgets within the next year, and overall IT budgets are increasing by 6.4%. As IT leaders look at their organizational needs, a majority (61%) will increase spending on new projects in the coming year. Edge technology spending, including mobile, social, CRM, M-commerce and marketing automation, continues to trend upward in the next one to three years.

Plans For New Project Spending Climbs Sharply
New or discretionary IT budget allocations have soared in the past year. In 2014, 47% of IT leaders said they would increase spending on new projects. This has jumped to 61% this year, which is the highest percentage since the question was first asked in 2009 (25%). Thirty-nine percent of new project spending will be on projects that help increase top line revenue. With one-third of IT budgets being spent on edge technologies, like the SMAC stack (Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud), organizations are looking to invest in new companies. Forty-six percent of CIOs surveyed plan to increase spending with new technology companies.

“Emerging technologies are the key to enterprise innovation. IT leaders are spending time learning about these new technologies, and the vendors creating them, and are allocating budget for technologies like the SMAC stack,” said Adam Dennison, SVP and publisher, CIO. “Enterprises are looking for the best solution and are not worried that those solutions are coming from ‘straight-to-the-enterprise start-ups.’ Emerging tech vendors should take this cue to showcase how their agile and innovative technology solutions can help businesses succeed.”

Increased Focus Continues on External Customer
External customers are a big focus for new IT projects. Nearly three-quarters (73%) believe IT is interacting with external customers more than two years ago while 37% will focus their new IT spending on external customer interaction, relationship or experience-related investments, up from 33% in 2013. Looking at the budget allocation, CIOs currently allocate 68% of their budget for core technologies like infrastructure, network, storage and 32% to newer “edge” technologies. However, in the next one to three years, the budget allocation for core technologies drops to 55% and the budget for edge technologies increases to 45% of their budgets.

IT Remains Involved in Technology Purchases Funded Outside of IT
Over three-quarters of IT leaders surveyed (76%) said they have a policy or process to ensure IT remains involved in tech purchases to reaffirm there is the right level of support and oversight from IT to keep problems at bay. When technology purchases are funded by other departments or functions, 58%say IT’s involvement varies depending on the individual department’s experience and expertise as well as on the scope of the project. In fact, 50% of IT leaders said line of business (LOB) counterparts identified their specific business need and came to IT for recommendations on technology and solution providers. For 21% of the CIOs we surveyed IT identifies the business need and makes recommendations regarding technology solutions or providers while 16% say LOB identifies the need and solution/provider then brings to IT for vetting. Just three percent say IT is not typically involved unless a problem arises and only one percent believe IT is not involved even if there’s a problem.

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Which Content Marketing Initiatives Are B2B Tech Marketers Working On?

Content Marketing Institute, Marketing Profs, IDG

Throughout this report, you’ll see how technology marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year and how they compare with the overall sample of B2B marketers who completed our annual content marketing survey. Among all groups we studied this year, technology marketers are the most likely to use content marketing. They’re also the group that is most focused on lead generation as the primary goal for their content marketing efforts. Producing engaging content continues to be a challenge for technology marketers; however, 73% are presently working on initiatives to improve in this area. View the infographic below to see which content marketing initiatives B2B tech marketers are working on today and tomorrow…

Download the full report here

WATCH A VIDEO on paid, owned, earned content marketing trends from this research

CMI Initiatives 19 Which Content Marketing Initiatives Are B2B Tech Marketers Working On?

New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

Screen Shot 2015 05 26 at 2.20.01 PM New IDC Forecast Asserts Worldwide Internet of Things Market to Grow 19% in 2015, Led by Digital Signage

19 May 2015

Spending projections include 25 use cases to provide insight on immediate opportunities for IoT technologies

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., May 19, 2015 – The worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) market is expected to grow 19% in 2015, led by digital signage, according to a new forecast from International Data Corporation (IDC). The second annual forecast focuses on growing IoT use in 11 vertical industries, including consumer, retail, healthcare, government, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries, while also sizing IoT opportunities for 25 vertical-specific use cases.

Unlike any other research in the industry, the new forecast specifically highlights worldwide spending across IoT use cases, including smart appliances, automated public transit, remote health monitoring, digital signage, connected vehicles, and air traffic monitoring, among others. The comprehensive spending model was designed to help vendors clearly understand the industry-specific opportunity for IoT technologies today.

  • ClicktoTweet,  @IDC Asserts Worldwide #InternetofThings Market to grow 19% in 2015, led by #Digitalsignage

Other key findings from the new forecast include:

  • The IoT market in manufacturing operations will grow from $42.2 billion in 2013 to $98.8 billion in 2018, a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.6%. Growth will be driven by ongoing efforts to increase efficiency and link islands of automation.
  • Digital signage use in retail outlets will grow from $6.0 billion in 2013 to $27.5 billion in 2018, a 35.7% five-year CAGR, as retailers continue to digitize the consumer experience.
  • The hottest US market is in connected vehicles, with 34.8% year-over-year growth anticipated in 2015.

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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

Continue reading… 

Boomers And Smartphones: The Freedom To Be Connected

MediaPost

by Gordon Plutsky

There have been few products or technical advances that have had as far reaching an impact as the smartphone. The modern era started with Blackberry and Treo, which soon gave way to the iPhone and various Android and Windows models. The Pew Research Center just completed a comprehensive study of how Americans use their smartphones and the results shed light on how Boomers (50-64) are using these devices. Overall, 64% of American adults own a smartphone, up from just 35% in 2011, and 2014 was the first year that the majority of access to the Internet was via mobile platforms.

Looking at the age breakouts, a few things become clear about Boomer smartphone usage. Among them, 54% own smartphones, only 10 points behind the overall adult population. While Boomer phone owners are behind 18-29 (85%) and 30-49 (79%), they have passed the critical 50% mark, and it is easy to see how that will rise over the next few years. Among Boomer smartphone owners: 94% make calls, 92% text, 87% use email, 80% access the internet, and a smaller number access social media (55%), videos (31%) and music (21%).

Any lingering perception that the 50+ populations is not using mobile devices to communicate can be put to rest at the same time there is room to grow for their usage of social, video and music. Boomers are active, but lagging behind the younger groups when it comes to activities such using a smartphone for: accessing information about a health issue (39%), online banking (34%), real estate info (26%), and government services (29%). Boomers are much closer to younger generations when it comes using smartphones to access breaking news (61%), sharing info about local events (60%) and learn about community events (45%).

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U.S. Mobile Users Spend The Most Time In Facebook And Instagram, Elsewhere Messaging Apps Dominate

 U.S. Mobile Users Spend The Most Time In Facebook And Instagram, Elsewhere Messaging Apps Dominate

By Sarah Perez

Messaging apps are becoming the most heavily-used type of app in a majority of key markets worldwide, based on both smartphone sessions and time spent in apps. However, according to new data from App Annie, the U.S. is an exception to that trend. Here, Facebook still dominates in terms of smartphone sessions, while both Facebook and Instagram led by time spent in apps.

The data collected was based on Android sessions in the first quarter of this year, so it’s not necessarily a full picture of the mobile application ecosystem or app usage – but it is sourced from one of the industry’s largest datasets on mobile data. In fact, App Annie’s dataset recently grew following its acquisition of  mobile measurement firm Mobidia last week. The firm is able to now detail app usage data from millions of users across 60 countries.

With Mobidia and App Annie’s data combined, the company put out its first-ever report examining usage-level trends regarding mobile applications, which looked, in particular, at countries like the U.S., U.K., Germany, Japan, and South Korea.

Not surprisingly, given that smartphones are primarily communication devices, the report found that within every key market, apps in the Communication and Social categories accounted for at least 40% of smartphone sessions on Android. And that trend was similar to how users spent time in apps, says App Annie.

In the U.S., Social remained the top category based on sessions per active user, thanks to Facebook’s prominent position here. But in the U.K., Germany, Japan, and South Korea, Communication was in the #1 position, referring to their preference for messaging apps.

 U.S. Mobile Users Spend The Most Time In Facebook And Instagram, Elsewhere Messaging Apps Dominate

In many of these countries, the Communication and Social categories dominate app sessions. For example, in South Korea, the two categories accounted for around 60% of smartphone app sessions. And the U.S. and Germany were not far behind. (See chart below.)

That means users are launching these sorts of apps more often than any other category of app on their phones, including mobile games.

 U.S. Mobile Users Spend The Most Time In Facebook And Instagram, Elsewhere Messaging Apps Dominate

Meanwhile, time spent in apps was also ruled by the Social and Communication categories. In both the U.S. and Germany again, the two accounted for approximately 60% of time spent in apps on Android smartphones. In South Korea and Japan, the time spent in the apps was slightly lower, but still accounted for 45% of total time spent in apps during Q1.

There are some differences about which apps are most popular in these countries, however, which speaks to regional differences and preferences for communication. For example, in the U.S., users seem to lean more towards one-to-many communication through social networks, while other countries appear to favor one-to-one communication.

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‘Dirty’ Data & Email Subject Lines

IDG Connect Marketers

This week’s marketing news roundup focuses on marketers wasting time on ‘dirty’ data and which email subject lines are most effective.

‘Dirty’ Data

Data is vital for B2B marketing but it looks like marketers could be wasting their time and effort on dirty data. According to a Spear Marketing Group recent poll, 54% of US B2B marketing executives estimated that over 25% of their marketing database included old, inaccurate, unusable or duplicate leads. Furthermore the majority of respondents described the accuracy of their data as “fair,” or “bad”. This problem also often manifests itself as a barrier to marketing across multiple channels.Econsultancy has found that 42% of marketers say inaccurate contact data is the biggest barrier to multichannel marketing.

‘Dirty’ data is not only wasting marketer’s time, it also affects the bottom line. Experian Data Quality research has found that the cost of inaccurate data has a direct impact on the bottom line of 88% of companies, with the average company losing 12% of its revenue.

Even though marketers have identified this problem, it looks like they’re reluctant to use solutions to overcome it. With 46% of respondents not employing such tools to automatically enrich, append, clean or de-dupe leads before they entered the system.

Email Subject Lines

Email subject lines can determine the success of your campaign. With so many emails flooding into mailboxes, competition is getting stiffer. And no matter how good your email design is, it won’t be seen if your email subject if it’s not engaging. Return Path’s recent study analysed nine million subject lines received by more than nine million subscribers to discover which subject lines are gaining the most success.

You may have often heard that shorter subject lines increases your read rate chances however the study has found no relationship between subject line length and read rate. Subject lines with 61-70 characters had the highest read rate and almost twice the read rate of subject lines with more than 100 characters. Even though the study demonstrates a higher read rate in the study, longer character emails only comprised of just 6% and 3% of the study. While the most commonly used length was 41-50 characters, in one-quarter of emails analysed.

The research discussed that even though there isn’t a relationship between subject line length and read rate it explains marketers should not pay attention to length. Mobile devices display subject lines in different ways and the research suggests that it’s more important to place a CTA at the beginning of a subject line if the audience is primarily mobile.

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Why Digital Marketers Must Drive the Customer Journey

IDG Connect 0811 Why Digital Marketers Must Drive the Customer Journey

Handing off customers, from marketing to sales to customer service, seems a bit jolting in today’s digital world. These days, customers own the online social relationship, and they don’t want to be passed around like a hot potato. They demand one group to guide them through the customer journey.

More often than not, this group is the digital marketing team.

Death of a salesman

Already there are signs that marketers are pushing out salespeople. Forrester predicts one million B2B sales jobs will disappear in the coming years, as customers research and purchase goods online. At DEMO Traction in San Francisco last week, many startup tech companies said they don’t even employ salespeople.
On the post-sale side, a fight has broken out on social media between marketers and customer service pros over control of the customer relationship. Customers don’t want to pick up a phone and call customer support anymore. They want answers online, where marketers hold sway yet aren’t good at providing customer service.

“Initially seen as an outbound channel for marketing, social media soon also saw consumers seeking customer service, something marketing teams were ill-prepared to handle,” writes Forrester analyst Ian Jacobs in a brief entitled Take Social Customer Service Beyond Your Own Walled Garden.

See this infographic on the marketing cycle…

Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

 

 Top Tips: Personalising the B2B Experience

Jonathan Pritchard, Managing Partner, Tangent Snowball

Jonathan has been with Tangent for ten years. Responsible for loyalty strategy and CRM planning at the agency, his experience covers Walkers Crisps, Carlsberg, Sky and Wolseley. He has devised, scoped, developed and deployed large scale tech developments, loyalty programmes, as well as advising clients on contact and content strategy.

Having spent many years advising clients on how best to use data to create relevant strategies and campaigns, here Jonathan shares his top tips on how to ensure a personalised customer experience in the b2b sector.

A new stage of personalisation is dawning; one of ‘hyper-personalisation’ and ‘marketing to the segment of one.’ It could be argued that personalisation is now entering its golden age.

Marketing within b2b is particularly suited to data-driven personalised marketing. This is because of the many different customer touch-points, the complex nature of their journeys, and the varying depth of involvement with each business.

However, the large amount of administration required in b2b means that companies have a rich source of vital information: the data. Coupling the data with the tools and your propositions makes for a powerful mix, despite lean budgets and resource.

1.    Remember: you’re still dealing with people

The most important thing to remember is that, whomever your audience comprises of – b2b technology marketers and IT decision makers perhaps – you are always dealing with people. The distinction between this, and B2C, is that customers here will be focussed on their company’s objectives, rather than their personal needs.  So how do you best address these? By presenting what you do in a humanised way. Reading up on behavioural economics will stand you in good stead here.

2.    Invest in your data

Many b2b businesses rely on relationships throughout the organisation to deliver on their objectives. It is key that everyone has the appropriate access to customer data to understand how best to serve that customer. In b2b, customer service is your key differential in often crowded market places. Your data will unlock a great deal of insight.

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5 Words That Will Kill Your Blog

UnMarketing

You’ve done the hardest parts of writing a blog post: Gotten the reader to your site, evoked a strong enough emotion to make them feel they need to add to the discussion and leave a comment, and they submit it and see this:

“Your comment is awaiting moderation”

“Your comment is awaiting approval”

“You need to register first”

Congratulations, you’ve just halted the conversation on your post.

For the most part, moderation is used to stop spam from appearing not necessarily to censor comments, but you’re hurting the voice of the very people that can be your biggest evangelists.

There are many issues with this:

  1. When a commenter sees those five words and has to wait for approval, it will stop them from spreading the post until it has been approved
  2. 99% of the time the commenter doesn’t get a notification that the comment has been approved, and so never spreads the original post at all.
  3. The flow of comments is dictated by the blog owners ability to approve comments in a timely fashion.
  4. As soon as a commenter sees that their original comment is awaiting moderation, they will hesitate to comment on anyone else’s comment in the thread.
  5. The commenter doesn’t know if it’s awaiting approval for being a non-spam comment, or that the blog owner is only allowing positive comments.

If the spam issue is your main reason for moderating blog comments, there are a few quick fixes.

  1. Install the Askimet plugin. This well-known, and free for personal use tool is amazing for filtering out spam comments. I average 100+ comments per post, and have only ever had to delete one spam comment that made it past Askimet’s filter.
  2. Use a comment management system like Disqus. That’s the system I use here. It allows threaded comments, meaning I or others can reply in-line to a comment and it makes it linked as a conversation, including emailing the original commenter that someone has replied, so they can return and continue the engagement. It also emails me every time someone comments, and I can reply on my Blackberry in the email, and it will post it as a comment. Not to mention if a spam comment slips through (or a troll) I just reply to the email with “delete” and it’s gone instantly.

There are some valid reasons to moderate comments, such as very sensitive topic-based sites (especially religion, politics, parents against Justin Bieber) and also large corporate blogs that have certain topics that bring out the “special” folks of the world.

But for the most part I see moderation being done on the very blogs that need comments: the ones that don’t have many at all. Especially when you’re starting out, let the conversation flow. Create community and engagement. The comments on my posts are 10X better than my original post. Why would I want to stifle that?

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