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CIO Tech Poll: Economic Outlook Reveals IT Budget Growth, Increased Spending on New IT Projects & IT Talent Concerns

 CIO Tech Poll: Economic Outlook Reveals IT Budget Growth, Increased Spending on New IT Projects & IT Talent Concerns

Increased Focus on External Customer Continues in Upcoming Year

Framingham, Mass. – May 27, 2015 – IDG’s CIO—the executive-level IT media brand providing insight into business technology leadership— reveals the CIO Tech Poll: IT Economic Outlook results for May 2015. The research indicates that half of organizations (50%) are increasing IT budgets within the next year, and overall IT budgets are increasing by 6.4%. As IT leaders look at their organizational needs, a majority (61%) will increase spending on new projects in the coming year. Edge technology spending, including mobile, social, CRM, M-commerce and marketing automation, continues to trend upward in the next one to three years.

Plans For New Project Spending Climbs Sharply
New or discretionary IT budget allocations have soared in the past year. In 2014, 47% of IT leaders said they would increase spending on new projects. This has jumped to 61% this year, which is the highest percentage since the question was first asked in 2009 (25%). Thirty-nine percent of new project spending will be on projects that help increase top line revenue. With one-third of IT budgets being spent on edge technologies, like the SMAC stack (Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud), organizations are looking to invest in new companies. Forty-six percent of CIOs surveyed plan to increase spending with new technology companies.

“Emerging technologies are the key to enterprise innovation. IT leaders are spending time learning about these new technologies, and the vendors creating them, and are allocating budget for technologies like the SMAC stack,” said Adam Dennison, SVP and publisher, CIO. “Enterprises are looking for the best solution and are not worried that those solutions are coming from ‘straight-to-the-enterprise start-ups.’ Emerging tech vendors should take this cue to showcase how their agile and innovative technology solutions can help businesses succeed.”

Increased Focus Continues on External Customer
External customers are a big focus for new IT projects. Nearly three-quarters (73%) believe IT is interacting with external customers more than two years ago while 37% will focus their new IT spending on external customer interaction, relationship or experience-related investments, up from 33% in 2013. Looking at the budget allocation, CIOs currently allocate 68% of their budget for core technologies like infrastructure, network, storage and 32% to newer “edge” technologies. However, in the next one to three years, the budget allocation for core technologies drops to 55% and the budget for edge technologies increases to 45% of their budgets.

IT Remains Involved in Technology Purchases Funded Outside of IT
Over three-quarters of IT leaders surveyed (76%) said they have a policy or process to ensure IT remains involved in tech purchases to reaffirm there is the right level of support and oversight from IT to keep problems at bay. When technology purchases are funded by other departments or functions, 58%say IT’s involvement varies depending on the individual department’s experience and expertise as well as on the scope of the project. In fact, 50% of IT leaders said line of business (LOB) counterparts identified their specific business need and came to IT for recommendations on technology and solution providers. For 21% of the CIOs we surveyed IT identifies the business need and makes recommendations regarding technology solutions or providers while 16% say LOB identifies the need and solution/provider then brings to IT for vetting. Just three percent say IT is not typically involved unless a problem arises and only one percent believe IT is not involved even if there’s a problem.

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CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

CITEworld

In the latest installment of CIO Quick Takes, three IT executives talk about the Internet of Things and the concerns that come with the opportunities offered by billions of connected devices.

When you hear the phrase Internet of Things (IoT), you are probably excited, confused, concerned or tired of hearing the buzzphrase — or maybe all of those things plus a few more. After all, the reality of digital devices acting on their own to capture, transmit and, in some cases, act on data affects everything from home appliances to telehealth is attention-getting.

Just how many “things” are are talking about? Gartner estimates that by 2020, the IoT will consist of 25 billion devices. Those devices, according to Cisco, will dominatethe Internet by 2018. Yep, dominate – meaning machines will communicate over the Internet more than we (i.e. humans) do. So if there’s a little fear, uncertainty and doubt mixed in among the excitement, it’s only natural.

gautam roy 1 100585688 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management: ‘In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions.’

 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says. 

And it’s not just consumer applications driving the technology. While consumer technology will account for the greatest number of connected things, according to Gartner, enterprises will drive the revenue. The research firm predicts that in 2020 the top industries will be utilities, manufacturing and government. The automotive sector is showing the greatest growth currently, Gartner says.

 

 
 
 
 
 

piddington ken 100585689 small.idge CIOs put the Internet of Things in perspective

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting: ‘I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. ‘

To gain a little context on the IoT and business, we reached out to three IT executives, with the help of our friends at the CIO Executive Council, for a little perspective. As you’ll note, there is a common theme among the responses.

When you think about the IoT, what do you see as the biggest opportunities and the biggest areas of concern?

 

Gautam Roy, vice president of IT, Waste Management

As the physical and digital worlds integrate more closely, the IoT will enhance and evolve our ability to manage and process information. The IoT has the potential to transform industries and the way we live and work by turning data into collaborative experience.

 

In the always-on world, the right data at the right time can help businesses to operate effectively and communicate with their customers to provide personalized solutions and optimize supply chain cost. It could help government tackle socioeconomic issues through a better understanding of data.

Issues are plenty: Security, privacy, integration complexity, governance, standards and policies.

Ken Piddington, CIO and Executive Advisor, MRE Consulting

The IoT or better-stated, the Internet of Everything is creating unprecedented opportunities for organizations to achieve great value from a growing network of connected devices. I believe that the biggest opportunities lie in the ability to collect, process and respond to data streams in real-time. For example, the value proposition for supply chain optimization is tremendous.

The biggest challenge is security. With the number of network devices increasing so does the number of attack vectors. A proper balance between security and use must be found for the IoT to deliver all the value envisioned for it.

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IDC: Industry Adoption of 3rd Platform Technologies Drive China’s ICT Markets

IDC PMS4colorversion  IDC: Industry Adoption of 3rd Platform Technologies Drive China’s ICT Markets

Shenzhen, April 24 2015 –2015 is the year of deepening reform, the last year of the “12th Five-Year Plan”, and the inaugural year of the “13th Five-Year Plan”. The policies and initiatives set by the Chinese government will have a tremendous impact on China’s economic development and global technology markets in the future. Amidst this macro situation, International Data Corporation (IDC) highlighted the key enterprise and consumer technology trends of the global and China’s ICT markets at IDC 2015 ICT Directions Conference in Shenzhen today. The roadshow will continue in Beijing (May 13), Shanghai (May 20), Guiyang (May 27) and end in Dalian (June 17). What are the key trends of the 3rd Platform supporting and accelerating technology and business innovation?  Below are some highlights from IDC 2015 ICT Directions event:

 

  • Everyone Needs an IoT Business Plan

The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly becoming reality for every business, as it enables new business models, creates low barriers to entry for competitors, and drives disruption in product development, while challenging the security and value of corporate data. According to Vernon Turner, Senior Vice President, Enterprise Infrastructure, Consumer, Network, Telecom and Sustainability Research (IDC), “ICT suppliers must align their traditional IT product road maps to include nontraditional markets in industry, government, and consumer.  Critical information and emerging industry standards must be shared to better develop supply chains, security data basis and predictive outcomes. Business outcomes will be driven by better connected IoT business plans shared by technology partners and their customers.”

 

 

  • The Next Wave of Mobile Devices

As mobility continues to change the way day-to-day activities are performed, so do the devices in which we interact with. According to Ryan Reith, Program Director, IDC’s WW Mobile Device Trackers (IDC), “As devices used for work and pleasure all migrate towards a more mobile world, device OEMs, IT buyers, consumers, and industry affiliates are all struggling to understand which form factor and platform will win out.”  The current landscape of consumer devices includes shifting dynamics within consumer buying trends, product pricing, platform wars, and hardware aesthetics for PC’s, tablets, detachables, smartphones, and wearables.

 

  • New Business Processes Drive New Workloads in the Digital Enterprise

According to Matt Eastwood, Group Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Platforms (IDC), “The 3rd Platform brings new technologies together, while at the same time creating a perfect storm for business leaders looking to compete effectively in the market. Digital transformation is creating new workloads as organizations leverage mobile, social, cloud, and analytics to enhance customer engagement and improve business decision making. IDC believes that many companies will need to develop entirely new technology infrastructures with radical impacts on the IT department as well as the datacenter.” According to Matt Eastwood, Group Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Platforms (IDC), “The 3rd Platform brings new technologies together, while at the same time creating a perfect storm for business leaders looking to compete effectively in the market. Digital transformation is creating new workloads as organizations leverage mobile, social, cloud, and analytics to enhance customer engagement and improve business decision making. IDC believes that many companies will need to develop entirely new technology infrastructures with radical impacts on the IT department as well as the datacenter.”

 

  • European Telecom Operators Must Capitalize on 3rd Platform Opportunities

According to Eric Owen, Group Vice President, EMEA Telecommunications & Networking Research (IDC), “The connectivity market in Europe has been in decline for several years now. However, as the ICT industry consolidates around the 3rd Platform, telecom operators are examining the opportunities this offers them in markets beyond connectivity.  Operators are looking at markets such as Cloud, Datacenter, Security and Mobility services to figure out where they can effectively compete.” Telecom operators cannot do this on their own and will need help from partners if they are to be successful in their transformation and their quest for revenue growth once again.

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The Transformation Equation

 The Transformation Equation

Digital business initiatives are illuminating the value of the enterprise infrastructure. At the same time, these business demands are increasing the pace at which IT must deploy new capabilities. In order to deliver, IT has to transform itself. The Transformation Equation explores how Enterprise IT is responding to this digital disruption. According to Network World’s 2015 State of the Network Survey, Network IT is already changing: 60% of technology and business professionals agree that collaborative teams are taking control of the network, especially at large companies.

Screen Shot 2015 05 18 at 12.01.12 PM 232x300 The Transformation Equation

This white paper will:

  • Provide a better understanding of how IT decision-makers are responding to digital disruption through integrating emerging technologies.
  • Present an in-depth look at the enterprise IT agenda, from cloud computing to mobile and security.
  • Show how software-defined networking (SDN) can add flexibility to the network.

Download the full white paper here

Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

IDG Connect 0811 Matching Expectations In The Millennial Generation

This is a contributed piece from Eneas Bernardo, Managing Director Brazil, RED

This article is the story of a conflict, between what the Millennial generation of IT staff is expecting, and what the business environment is demanding. It’s about what’s happening in Brazil – but it applies to some extent everywhere in the world.

Does IT matter?

The story starts a few years ago in 2003, when, in an article, Nicholas Carr stated, “IT doesn’t matter”. With this statement, Carr threw cold water over the industry. His article brought to light the darkest fear of the IT sector: that rather than be recognized as a business advantage, it was being seen mostly as a cost.

This fear had already been felt to some extent by the ‘mainframe generation’, also known as baby boomers. It might have been sensed, and probably ignored, by their younger cousins, the ‘Downsizers’ or ‘Generation X’.

But the youngest generation in the workforce, the ‘Netties’ or ‘Generation Y’, had grown up in a world where IT was all around and to them it was ever-present. Regardless of Carr’s predictions, IT continued to play a key role, at least for the time being.

Increasing pressures

Moving forward to the next scene in our story, we see the pressure over IT projects increasing on staff. And, as they struggle to gain the elusive benefits of IT that they still believe are there, many companies are spending more and more money on ERP and other buzzwords that promised competitive advantage and best practices – and the gold ticket for growth and profitability.

Cut to the next scene: the global financial crisis of the 2000s and 2010s. To respond, organisations kicked off a desperate pursuit for cost cutting, and strove to innovate in order to survive – let alone be profitable.

What it means for staff

What’s been the impact on staff of these recent trends?

With unemployment at the highest rates since the great depression, there are also more people to educate, more people to feed, and more people to employ. At the same time, businesses are looking for fewer employees.

Business targets and plans are also piling on the pressure. Projects are shortened, costs are reviewed, and staffing is reduced – so the people who remain need to handle more and more duties. Staff must take on more projects, deliverables and targets. They need to handle quality assurance, to consider new issues such as sustainability, and to evaluate information and data coming from many sources such as financials, manufacturing, human resources, customer relationship management and the supply chain.

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Ready or Not, the Internet of Things Is Coming

eMarketer

Think the net neutrality debate is all about streaming videos? Think again. It’s actually much more than that: It’s about streaming your life. Internet connectivity might seem ubiquitous today, between the use of PCs, mobile devices, and smart TVs, but there are major swaths of daily life that aren’t connected yet that soon will become so, such as homes and cars, according to a new eMarketer report, “Key Digital Trends for Midyear 2014: The Internet of Things, Net Neutrality, and Why Marketers Need to Care.”

Connecting all the unconnected devices, machines and systems will involve vast numbers of new internet-enabled objects and large sums of money. In a relatively untapped market with seemingly limitless potential, forecasts tend toward the sky-high:

  • International Data Corporation predicts the worldwide market for “internet of things” (IoT) solutions will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020.
  • MarketsandMarkets gives the IoT market a more conservative—but still lofty—valuation of $1.029 trillion in 2013, increasing to $1.423 trillion by 2020.
  • Gartner forecasts 26 billion connected objects worldwide by 2020 (a figure that does not include PCs, smartphones and tablets).
  • IDATE projects 80 billion internet-connected things in 2020, up from 15 billion in 2012. This figure does include PCs, TVs and smart devices, but the vast majority (85%) will be objects like car tires or shipping pallets that may communicate with the web via an intermediate device. Devices that communicate directly, such as PCs, TVs and mobile phones, will make up 11% of the total in 2020.
  • Cisco Systems predicts 50 billion things will be connected by 2022, yielding $19 trillion in new revenues ($14.4 trillion of which will accrue to private-sector corporations).

“There’s no doubt the world is moving toward a more connected future, but the speed with which consumers and enterprises make the transition to the internet of things is still to be determined,” said Noah Elkin, executive editor at eMarketer. “The timing of adoption will determine just how much money and how many things are involved.”

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B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

Content Marketing Institute, Marketing Profs, IDG

Throughout this report, you’ll see how technology marketers have changed their content marketing practices over the last year and how they compare with the overall sample of B2B marketers who completed our annual content marketing survey. Among all groups we studied this year, technology marketers are the most likely to use content marketing. They’re also the group that is most focused on lead generation as the primary goal for their content marketing efforts. Producing engaging content continues to be a challenge for technology marketers; however, 73% are presently working on initiatives to improve in this area.

Download the 2015 B2B Tech Content Marketing Report

Watch a VIDEO on paid, owned, earned content marketing trends from this research

 Screen Shot 2015 03 26 at 8.52.05 AM B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

The infographic below states which content marketing initiatives B2B tech marketers are working on today and tomorrow. Click here for more info. 

CMI Initiatives 19 B2B TECHNOLOGY CONTENT MARKETING: 2015 BENCHMARKS, BUDGETS, AND TRENDS – NORTH AMERICA

Middle East Buyer Behavior

In the first part of IDG Connect Asks research series, we look at buyer behaviour in the Middle East. We surveyed 495 IT professionals in Middle Eastern countries: Turkey, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Bahrain.  372 respondents were from the non-tech industry while the further 107 were from the tech industry.  Respondents were asked a multiple choice question; “When you participate in a purchase decision as part of a buying team which of the following phrases best describes your approach?”.

IDG Connect Buyer Behaviour Regional Research – Middle East

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The State of Digital Marketing

Sitecore

Approaches to digital marketing in the Benelux

IDG Connect surveyed 53 people based in Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands identifying themselves as marketing directors or mangers, chief marketing officers and vice presidents of marketing marketers, roughly of half of whom work at companies employing 1,000 or more people.

You can find the Infographic below, on this page and download the white paper that analyzes the survey results in detail.

Information technology never stands still, and whilst the pace of its evolution presents marketers with significant challenges it also opens up a wealth of opportunity for companies willing and able to exploit new information consumption trends and software tools to get targeted messages in front of their customers.

Digital marketing strategies can include disciplines as diverse as display and search ads, email marketing, SMS messages, digital events, company websites, search engine optimisation, mobile web and web applications, and social media marketing tools, the combination of which offers unparalleled scope to personalise content to attract new customers, keep old ones and improve conversion rates with timely and relevant offers.

Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 1.54.14 PM The State of Digital Marketing

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The Power of Knowledge

The Power of Knowledge white paper takes a comprehensive look at the IDG Enterprise 2014 Customer Engagement research to better understand the preferences of the IT buyer. The results find that IT decision-makers do not need more content, but more reliable, credible and accurate information throughout the purchase process.

This white paper will:

  • Explain the challenges IT decision-makers have when it comes to finding useful information.
  • Provide a better understanding of timing, format and relevance of the content that your target audience is searching for.
  • Highlight key ways social sharing of content and social interactions help create a trustworthy brand, and how IT buyers better perceive these brands.
  • Show how technology marketers and sales can better integrate in order to ensure a smoother customer journey.

 

Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 1.00.24 PM The Power of Knowledge

Click here for your copy…