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Does it matter that some New York Times editors and writers don’t tweet? Yes and no

Gigaom

BuzzFeed recently ran a post on what it called the New York Times‘ “Twitter graveyard,” which turned out to be a list of accounts set up by the newspaper’s editorial staff that are either dormant or unused, including some that still have the default egg avatar given to Twitter newbies. But does that mean some staffers just haven’t taken to a particular platform, or does it mean the paper’s writers and editors aren’t doing enough to engage with readers?

That was the underlying question behind a discussion I had with a number of senior NYT staffers on Monday — including the paper’s deputy digital editor and co-author of the recent internal “innovation report” — after one (a senior member of the paper’s development team, Jacob Harris) referred to the BuzzFeed piece somewhat dismissively, implying that using Twitter accounts as a proxy for whether journalists are doing their jobs is neither fair nor particularly enlightening (I’ve also created a Storify collection of some of the relevant tweets).

I tried to argue that focusing solely on whether someone is on Twitter is trivial, and may even be unfair, but the larger point being made by BuzzFeed and others is that the Times may be lacking in the area of social engagement with readers. And this is important because it could literally be the key to survival for media companies and journalists alike, as social starts to replace search.

Engaging means more than just listening

A number of Times staffers, including deputy international editor Lydia Polgreen, made the point that there are plenty of reporters and editors who use Twitter regularly and are open to engaging with readers, a group that includes media writerDavid Carr, Polgreen herself, science writer John Schwartz, columnist Nick Kristofand others. As she pointed out, readers have far more engagement potential with NYT writers than they have ever had.

Foreign correspondent Damien Cave and others echoed a common refrain, which is that just because a New York Times reporter or editor doesn’t tweet a lot doesn’t mean that they aren’t listening to readers and following conversations about stories — a point that deputy digital editor Amy O’Leary also made. Others noted that there are lots of different ways to respond to readers and engage with them, including Facebook, email and in person.

As I tried to argue, however, listening is only part of the equation when it comes to engagement, and it’s likely the easiest part. The hard part is having to respond when someone criticizes your piece or points out an error — but that is also when engaging is at its most powerful, and it can ultimately result in better journalism.

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5 Infographics to Teach You How to Easily Create Infographics in PowerPoint [+ TEMPLATES]

Hubspot

These days, visual content is all the rage. And considering the fact that people are naturally drawn to pictures, images, and other visuals, it’s no wonder it’s become such a dominant force in the marketing world. Just think about how much more prominently visuals get featured in social networks like Facebook and Google+. And what about the rise of visual-focused networks like Pinterest, Instagram, and Vine? There’s no denying it — visual content is here to stay, and marketers who can learn how to master it will have a leg up on competitors who can’t.

When most marketers hear the term “visual content,” the first type that comes to mind is usually the infographic. But how can those who don’t necessarily have a design background — or budget to commission an agency, hire a dedicated in-house designer, or purchase expensive design software — create professional-looking infographics that enable them to leverage the power of visual content? We’re so glad you asked! Here’s a little secret: You can do it right within software you likely already have loaded on your computer. That’s right!PowerPoint can be your best friend when it comes to visual content creation. And to help you get started, we’ve created five fabulous infographic templates you can download for free and use to customize your own infographics right within PowerPoint — as well as some helpful tips and tricks to help you learn how to use PowerPoint to its full potential.

In this post, we’ll highlight some PowerPoint infographic creation basics as well as four of the infographic templates from the download that explain how to easily create infographics in PowerPoint (how meta, right?). Just be sure to download the PowerPoint templates for yourself so you can easily customize the designs you see here!

 

Worldwide Integrated Infrastructure and Platforms Revenue Increased 33.8% Year Over Year to $2.4 Billion in the Second Quarter of 2014

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Worldwide Integrated Infrastructure and Platforms Revenue Increased 33.8% Year Over Year to $2.4 Billion in the Second Quarter of 2014

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. – According to the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly Integrated Infrastructure and Platforms Tracker, the worldwide integrated infrastructure and platforms market increased revenue 33.8% year over year to $2.4 billion during the second quarter of 2014 (2Q14). The market generated more than 833 petabytes of new storage capacity shipments during the quarter, which was up 63.4% compared to same period a year ago. First half results were comparable with the market value growing 35.9% compared to 1H2013, to $4.3 billion.

“It’s notable that sales of integrated systems have driven considerable and continued growth at a time when many portions of the enterprise infrastructure market have experienced lackluster results,” said Eric Sheppard, Research Director, Storage. “Integrated systems have clearly become a critical go-to market approach and an important source of growth for infrastructure suppliers looking to capitalize on a market need to reduce datacenter infrastructure inefficiencies.”

“IDC continues to find enterprise customers bullish in their adoption of integrated systems; a greater number of customers are considering these solutions in their IT procurement decisions,”said Jed Scaramella, Research Director, Enterprise Servers. “As a result the integrated systems market is shaping up to be a competitive battleground for IT vendors. A critical win in the market translates into increased footprint within the customer base, usually at the expense of a competitor.”

Integrated Platforms vs. Integrated Infrastructure

IDC distinguishes between two market segments: Integrated Platforms and Integrated Infrastructure. Integrated platforms are integrated systems that are sold with additional pre-integrated packaged software and customized system engineering optimized to enable such functions as application development software, databases, testing, and integration tools. Integrated infrastructure systems are designed for general-purpose, distributed workloads that are likely to have differing performance profiles. While integrated infrastructure is similar to integrated platforms in that it will leverage the same infrastructure building blocks, it is not optimized for a specific workload.

During the second quarter of 2014, the Integrated Platforms market generated more than $1 billion in sales, which represented an 11.1% year-over-year growth rate and 43.7% of the total market value. Oracle was the largest supplier of Integrated Platform Systems with $577 million in sales, or 55.0% share of the market segment.

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New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 New IDC Study Finds that Tech Marketing Budgets Will Rebound in 2014 with Average Increase of 3.5% for the Largest IT Vendors

This in spite of tech marketing turmoil and transformation, as half of tech companies replaced CMO in last 24 months

FRAMINGHAM, Mass. – The 12th Annual Tech Marketing Benchmark Study from the International Data Corporation (IDCCMO Advisory Service finds that marketing budgets among the 101 technology companies surveyed will increase by an average of 3.5% in 2014. Those same companies expect a revenue increase of 3.7% for the same period. Despite this momentum, the CMO role remains very fluid as marketing organizations attempt to reinvent their capabilities and effectiveness in a new era of marketing. In a related study, IDC finds that 51% of tech CMO’s have been in their position for fewer than two years.

Two-thirds of the companies surveyed by IDC will increase their marketing budgets in 2014 while only 20% of the companies will decrease their marketing budgets with the remainder indicating no change in budget levels. Notably, companies with a high percentage of 3rd Platform products (cloud, social, mobile and Big Data and analytics) will receive marketing budget increases upwards of five times that of the average tech company, increasing their budgets 10-20% year over year.

“For the first time in eight years, IDC is seeing that marketing budgets are increasing at about the same rate as revenues. This is positive news for tech marketers and also a clear indication that the C-suite is ready to put additional marketing investment up against more promising business prospects,” saidSam Melnick, Senior Research Analyst, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, both the CMO and CEO must understand that momentum is being driven by success in 3rd Platform solution areas. To continue this growth, executives must continue to invest to be competitive in these high-upside segments.”

“We examined 152 tech companies with a current CMO in place and found that 77, just over half, have replaced their CMO in the last 24 months – an astonishing rate of change. CMOs must own the digital disruption of buyer experience for their companies. Those CMOs able to rise to the challenge will be provided more resources and given more power. The unprepared will be replaced,” said Kathleen Schaub, Vice President, IDC CMO Advisory Service. “However, tech CEOs must also wake up to the impact marketing now wields over revenue and reputation. It’s their job to pick the right person for today’s challenges. To get CMO selection right means the CEO needs to understand and get closer to marketing.”

The 12th annual 2014 Tech Marketing Benchmark Study was recently completed by IDC’s CMO Advisory Service and seeks to capture the full marketing spend and marketing headcount allocations of global companies within the technology sector. The research effort surveyed 101 companies, with the average company’s revenue surpassing $7 billion. IDC’s 2015 Marketing Investment Planner containing study details will be published in November and will be available on IDC.com. In a parallel study, the CMO Advisory Service studied 152 tech companies ranging from $50 million to $100 billion in revenue to observe their CMO tenure.

About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community to make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and business strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries. In 2014, IDC celebrates its 50th anniversary of providing strategic insights to help clients achieve their key business objectives. IDC is a subsidiary of IDG, the world’s leading technology media, research, and events company. You can learn more about IDC by visiting www.idc.com. Follow IDC on Twitter at @IDC.

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U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

IDC PMS4colorversion 1  U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

FRAMINGHAM, Mass., September 16, 2014IDC Government Insights today announced the availability of a new report, Perspective: Looking Up – U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustain Growth Through 2018 (Doc #GI250735). The detailed report, a follow-up to IDC Government Insights’ inaugural cloud spending forecast in July 2013, evaluates how the U.S. Federal Government is spending part of its IT budget on cloud-based solutions. According to the new forecast, cloud spending now represents about 5% of all IT spending by the federal government. IDC Government Insights expects that the growth will continue into FY2015.

  • ClicktoTweet:  IDC U.S. Federal Cloud Forecast Shows Sustained Growth Through 2018, According to IDC Government Insights

For five years, both the U.S. Federal CIO Council and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) have been pushing government agencies to move some types of IT systems to the cloud, particularly new systems, stored data, and mobile solutions. The ongoing level of spending on cloud solutions indicates that this effort is finally having a significant long-term effect. Total cloud spending is going up and the nature of cloud spending itself is changing.

Key highlights from the forecast include:

  • Federal cloud spending for FY2014 will come in higher that originally predicted. A year ago, OMB stated that agencies are slated to spend a little over $2.2 billion on cloud solutions for 2014. By the end of this fiscal year, that number will grow to more than $3.0 billion.
  • As in the previous two years, OMB has predicted a slight pull-back on cloud spending for upcoming FY2015. The current estimate is just under $2.9 billion for next year, however, IDC Government Insights believes that cloud spending will actually increase, not decrease, for FY2015, rising to perhaps to as much as $3.4 billion.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) is passing Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) as the largest type of cloud spending. Last year, OMB estimated that agencies would spend $1.2 billion on IaaS and $724 million on SaaS for FY 2014. This meant that government was different than other industries, since most spend more of their cloud dollars on SaaS. But by the time FY2014 ends on September 30th, the federal government will have spent just $986 million on IaaS, and over $1.3 billion on SaaS.

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4 ways magazines are making video work

Digiday

Magazine publishers have plowed money and resources into video. The reason is obvious: Video advertising is a booming market, with plump ad prices that dwarf the CPMs display ads fetch.

But the devil is in the details or, more precisely, in the execution. There are internal challenges to organizing to create video — just ask Condé Nast – in addition to problems around generating a viewership of sufficient scale and putting together attractive ad packages.

“Legacy publishers seem to have internal difficulties shifting to a multi-format content model that is committed to each distribution platform from dot-com to social to apps,” said Paul Kontonis, executive director of the Global Online Video Association. “Shared services is a way to get a publisher to dip their toe in video without overhauling the existing hierarchies, politics and comforting bureaucracies.”

Traditional publishers have made great headway to reinvent their content strategy and distribution model, but they are still building diversified video inventory at scale, said Robin Steinberg, evp, publishing and digital director of investment and activation, MediaVest.

“They are contending with publishers outside their traditional competitive set with stronger targeting capabilities and pricing structures,” she said. “Due to their traditional print legacy position in the marketplace, they have to push harder for a prime seat at the digital video marketplace table.”

Find out the four ways publishers are trying to ensure success…

The growing market for digital video ads

Digiday

As online video consumption continues to climb, advertising budgets have swelled to match.

Much of that action happens on YouTube, which owns a huge chunk of the digital video ad market, but probably won’t capture much more in the coming years. It’s an exciting market for publishers, which are looking to counter declining display ad rates. The rise of programmatic buying also has enthused budget-savvy brands and agencies, and video publishers are slowly coming around to embrace the new tech.

Here’s what the market looks like today — and how it will take shape in the years to come.

The digital video ad market will grow faster in 2014 than future years.
The U.S. digital ad spend will grow to $5.9 billion this year, up 56 percent from 2013, according to eMarketer data released last week. But that growth will cool in future years, declining to 13.9 percent by 2018, when the total digital video spend will reach $12.82 billion, eMarketer forecasts.

The research firm cites two trends to explain the dwindling growth. The first: proliferation of premium subscription services like Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, which don’t serve ads. The second, less obvious factor: the growth of mobile video. Mobile video consumption has surged 532 percent since 2012, according to video technology specialist Ooyala. But mobile videos tend to be shorter, and have shorter, less expensive ads accompanying them, so that sector actually suppresses the overall market, eMarketer reasons.

Read on for charts and more information…

Facebook Announces Facebook Media — A Resource For Media Organizations

Marketing Land

Facebook today rolled out Facebook Media, a new resource to help media organizations and public figures with their Facebook efforts. Facebook Media is modeled after Facebook for Business, a hub for advertisers on the social network.

Facebook director of media partnerships Nick Grudin explained the purpose of the effort in a blog post:

Every day, content creators around the world — from digital publishers, to public figures, to video producers — use Facebook to connect with their audiences in innovative ways. They reach new fans, start conversations and drive discovery of new stories. In the process, they make Facebook more vibrant.

At Facebook, we are committed to building a platform to make these connections broader, richer and more dynamic. That’s why today we are introducing Facebook Media — to highlight great examples and new trends illustrating how public figures, organizations and media are using Facebook to connect with their audiences.

Facebook Media is filled with best-practice advice, much of which applies to anyone using Facebook as a marketing tool. For instance, there’s a good list of tips for driving referrals to digital properties that should be required reading.

 

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