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IDC’s 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

By, Kathleen Schaub

What does IDC predict for tech CMOs and their teams in 2015 and beyond?

Sunrise%2B1 IDCs 10 Predictions for CMOs for 2015

Our recent report IDC FutureScape: Worldwide CMO / Customer Experience 2015 Predictionshighlights insight and perspective on long-term industry trends along with new themes that may be on the horizon. Here’s a summary.

1: 25% of High-Tech CMOs Will Be Replaced Every Year Through 2018
There are two dominant drivers behind the increased CMO turnover over the past two years. One driver centers on the cycle of new product innovations, new companies, and new CMO jobs. The second (but equal) driver centers around the required “fit” for a new CMO in the today’s tumultuous environment and the short supply of CMOs with transformational skill sets.

Guidance: Everyone in the C-Suite needs to “get” modern marketing to make the CMO successful.

2: By 2017, 25% of Marketing Organizations Will Solve Critical Skill Gaps by Deploying Centers of Excellence
The speed of marketing transformation and the increased expectations on marketing have left every marketing organization in need of updating its skill sets. In the coming years, CMOs will not only have to recruit and train talent but also create organizational structures that amplify and share best practices. Leading marketing organizations will become masters of the centers of excellence (CoE).

Guidance: Get out of your traditional silos and collaborate.

3: By 2017, 15% of B2B Companies Will Use More Than 20 Data Sources to Personalize a High-Value Customer Journey
Personalization requires a lot of data. CMOs do not suffer from a lack of data — quite the contrary. Today’s marketer has dozens, if not hundreds, of sources available. However, companies lack the time, expertise, and financial and technical resources to collect data, secure it, integrate it, deliver it, and dig through it to create actionable insights. This situation is poised for dramatic change.

Guidance: One of your new mantras must be – “do it for the data”.

4: By 2018, One in Three Marketing Organizations Will Deliver Compelling Content to All Stages of the Buyer’s Journey
CMOs reported to IDC that “building out content marketing as an organizational competency” was their #2 priority (ROI was #1). Content marketing is what companies must do when self-sufficient buyers won’t talk to sales people. While it’s easy to do content marketing; it’s hard to do content marketing well. The most progressive marketing organizations leverage marketing technology and data to develop a buyer-centric content strategy.

Guidance: Remember that it’s the buyer’s journey – not your journey for the buyer.

5: In 2015, Only One in Five Companies Will Retool to Reach LOB Buyers and Outperform Those Selling Exclusively to IT
IDC research shows that line-of-business (LOB) buyers control an average of 61% of the total IT spend. LOB buyers are harder to market to and are even more self-sufficient than technical buyers. To succeed with this new buyer, tech CMOs must move more quickly to digital, incorporate social, broaden the types of content, and enable the sales team to maximize their limited time in front of the customer.

Guidance: Worry less about how much video is in your plan and worry more about your message.

6: By 2016, 50% of Large High-Tech Marketing Organizations Will Create In-House Agencies
Advertising agencies have been slow to recognize the pervasive nature of digital. While many digital agencies exist and many have been acquired by the global holding companies, these interactive services typically managed as just another part of the portfolio of services the agency offers. Modern marketing practitioners realize that digital is now in the DNA of everything they do and are ahead of their agencies.

Guidance: Don’t wait. Take the lead.

Continue reading… 

 

Top 10 tech stories of 2014

ITWorld

Backlash! Disrupting the disruptors

Blowing up entrenched business models and picking up the profits that spill onto the floor is a time-honored tradition in tech, these days known by the cliche of the moment, “disruption.” This year everyone was trying to push back against those upstarts, whether by buying them like Facebook did, reorganizing to compete with them like HP and Microsoft have done, or just plain going out against them guns blazing, as it seemed that every city and taxi company did with Uber.

European courts fought the disruptive effect Google search has had on our very sense of the historical record. But meanwhile, legions of net neutrality supporters in the US spoke up to save the Internet’s core value of disruption against the oligopoly of a handful of communications carriers.

Here are our picks for the top stories of a very, well, disruptive year….

2014 Tech Insights To Prepare For 2015

 2014 Tech Insights To Prepare For 2015

The 2014 ITworld Tech Insights research was completed with the goal of showcasing the IT spending priorities and influence of the ITworld audience.

Highlights include:

  • 64% of organizations expect spending to increase over the next 12 months.
  • IT leaders remain in charge of much of the purchase process for technology products and services, but when it comes to the role of evaluating technology for purchase, it’s all hands on deck.
  • IT buyers trust those they know when it comes to advice on upcoming technology product and service purchases and continue to most likely look to their peers/colleagues for guidance. They typically consult peers in their professional network on a weekly basis.

Download the research now… 

Or, click here to view slides…

World Tech Update Video – Dec 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on World Tech Update this week Google creates a new kind of CAPTCHA, Amazon hires some robotic help for the holiday season and an e-ink smartphone goes on sale.

Holiday gift guide 2014: Top-notch tech for $150 or more

Computerworld

Part 1 of Computerworld’s annual roundup of holiday gift ideas features best-in-class phones and tablets, ingenious cameras and other premium tech gear for your family and friends. (Or maybe for you?)

Find the perfect tech gift

Maybe we’re biased, but we think tech gear always makes a great present. Who wouldn’t want to open up a gift-wrapped package to find a sleek new smartphone or a colorful speaker that can fill a room with sound?

The cleverly designed, exactingly made gear in Part 1 of our holiday gift guide will please technology lovers of all stripes, from party-givers to lifeloggers. When possible, we’ve included a range of prices as offered by various retailers, but be aware that prices fluctuate. As always, be careful of false deals and scams.

Note that you won’t find any smartwatches or fitness bands in this roundup. There are so many new and interesting products in these hot categories that we found it impossible to choose just one or two products for our gift guide. Instead, we’re devoting a separate story to the latest and greatest in high-tech wristwear — check back for that soon.

Also coming up are Parts 2 and 3 of our holiday gift guide, featuring midpriced gear and stocking stuffers.

Meanwhile, feast your eyes on the best over-$150 tech presents to give and get this year.

Top five tips for this year’s tech Santa

Macworld

Perhaps, between this month’s tinselly advertisements, you’ve heard that this is the Season of Giving. While many people consider the name nothing more than an invitation to pass poinsettias between friends, some understand that it also means giving of your time and talents. For example, as a Macworld reader there’s every chance that you have technical knowledge to spare—some of which would be deeply appreciated by those family and friends you visit over the holidays. Might I suggest, in the spirit of sharing, that you lend a hand in the following five ways?

Give a faster Mac for not much money

There is no better way to speed up an older Mac than to add a solid state drive (SSD) as a boot volume. It matters not at all which modernish Mac model you’re talking about. If it currently uses a spinning mechanical drive, replacing that drive with an SSD will produce jaw-dropping results.

how to buy a gaming laptop ssd 100531179 large Top five tips for this years tech SantaSANDISK
Shove an SSD into a loved one’s Mac and they’ll love you forever.

If installing such a thing is beyond your ken, you can find instructions from bothiFixit and OWC (and each can sell you a drive).

Note that Yosemite doesn’t support TRIM on third-party drives (see the linked article for details) so you’ll want to be careful about which SSD you choose.

Also, as an SSD is likely to have less capacity than the drive you’re replacing, you should consider storing items found within the Home folder on another volume. And if this Mac holds just one drive, don’t fret. In Giving the gift of speed: The SSD upgrade I discuss adding a second drive to certain Macs.

Power to your people

This next suggestion is more or less helpful depending on where the target of your holiday affection lives. Country dwellers with questionable power lines and those subject to weather-related outages will find it the most useful. And that suggestion is that you carefully wrap an uninterrupted power supply (UPS) and shove it under the mistletoe. Both you and it are likely to get a kiss.

apc ups 100534205 medium Top five tips for this years tech Santa
When the lights go out, your friends and family will think of you.

For those unfamiliar with these devices, a UPS is essentially a large battery that provides additional power outlets and a measure of surge protection. Should the power suddenly go out, a UPS can keep a computer running for awhile—long enough to save your work and then safely shut down the computer. APCis probably the most well known brand, but other companies make these things too.

When giving the gift of power you’ll want to be on hand when it’s put to use. And no, not just so you can receive warm thanks. Rather, you should be there to help ensure that the right devices are plugged into it. For example, only key components should pull power from the battery. There’s no reason to attach a laser printer to it, for example. Nor should you tax the battery with a nearby TV. Instead, be sure that the computer’s power cord is attached as well as any peripherals that the computer absolutely requires—a monitor if it’s attached to a Mac mini, for instance. You could also attach the broadband modem and router to it so that your family can continue to use the Internet until such time that the battery drains (helpful for checking a power company’s website to learn when power might be restored).

 

Continue reading… 

In 2015, Technology Shifts Accelerate and China Rules, IDC Predicts

NYT

In the year-end predictions game, most technology forecasts tend to be either blue sky or boring, flights of imagination or a firm grasp of the obvious.

For the last several years, IDC has published prediction reports that generally avoid the pitfalls of the genre, and offer a useful framework for thinking about the trajectory of trends in technology. The technology research firm’s predictions for 2015, published on Tuesday, come in a 17-page report that is rich in numbers and analysis.

Beyond the detail, a couple of larger themes stand out. First is China. Most of the reporting and commentary recently on the Chinese economy has been about its slowing growth and challenges.

“In information technology, it’s just the opposite,” Frank Gens, IDC’s chief analyst, said in an interview. “China has a roaring domestic market in technology.”

In 2015, IDC estimates that nearly 500 million smartphones will be sold in China, three times the number sold in the United States and about one third of global sales. Roughly 85 percent of the smartphones sold in China will be made by its domestic producers like Lenovo, Xiaomi, Huawei, ZTE and Coolpad.

The rising prowess of China’s homegrown smartphone makers will make it tougher on outsiders, as Samsung’s slowing growth and profits recently reflect.

More than 680 million people in China will be online next year, or 2.5 times the number in the United States. And the China numbers are poised to grow further, helped by its national initiative, the Broadband China Project, intended to give 95 percent of the country’s urban population access to high-speed broadband networks.

In all, China’s spending on information and communications technology will be more than $465 billion in 2015, a growth rate of 11 percent. The expansion of the China tech market will account for 43 percent of tech-sector growth worldwide.

Another theme in the IDC report is the quickening pace of the move from older technologies to new ones. Overall spending on technology and telecommunications, IDC estimates, will rise by a modest 3.8 percent in 2015. Yet the top-line numbers mask the trends beneath. IDC predicts there will be growth of 13 percent in what the research firm calls “3rd platform” technologies (cloud, mobile, social and big data). By contrast, older technologies will face a no-growth “near recession,” according to IDC, and “will shift fully into recession” by the second half of next year.

IDC’s 3rd platform is similar to what Gartner, another big research firm, has called a “nexus of forces” sweeping through the industry. (Gartner’s ingredients are virtually the same as IDC’s with slightly different labels — social interaction, mobility, cloud and information.) The 1st platform, in IDC’s taxonomy, was the mainframe era, running from the 1960s into the 1980s. The 2nd platform included personal computers and the Internet, and began in the 1980s and ran through the middle of the first decade of this century.

Continue reading… 

11 technologies Apple has killed

CITEworld

Out with the old

One of the things that makes Apple so successful is that it’s not afraid to abandon/kill popular technologies in the interest of something new. In doing so, the company often creates a bit of controversy, even if in the long run it seems to pan out well. At the same time, Apple’s revolutionary products have helped bring down entire product categories. Here is a rundown of technologies and products that Apple has killed (or is in the process of killing) over the last 17 years.

Floppy Drive

The first product released during Steve Jobs’s second stint at Apple was the Bondi Blue iMac. The all-in-one design was an immediate hit with consumers, and the machine was notable as much for its iconic look and performance as it was for the features it didn’t include. Specifically, the first iMac shipped without a floppy drive. At the time, back in 1997, this was a huge deal. To some critics, Apple was running a huge risk by completely doing away with what was then a common storage medium. Jobs and Apple, though, had the foresight to realize that computing was rapidly becoming Internet-centric, thereby eliminating the need for old-fashioned floppy drives.

Apple’s 30-pin connector

For over a decade, iPod, iPhone, and iPad users alike relied on Apple’s tried-and-true 30-pin connector for charging and to connect their devices with computers and accessories. But Apple said goodbye to the 30-pin connector in 2012 when it introduced the Lightning connector, a superior standard for a number of reasons. In addition to being smaller and more robust, the Lightning connector is reversible, which makes for a more efficient user experience. Naturally, abandoning the 30-pin connector on new iOS devices caused temporary problems for individual consumers and even large companies who had spent lots of money on older iOS accessories.

Netbooks

Remember Netbooks? A few years back, these hyper-small laptops were poised to be the next big thing in computing. In fact, back in 2008 and 2009, netbooks were flying off the shelves. As a result, there was a lot of pressure for Apple to enter the netbook market. Apple, however, went a different route when it released the iPad. Rather than opting for a compromised device, the company entered a new product category entirely with the iPad. The end result was a rather quick demise for the netbook, and in parallel, a reinvigorated market for tablets.

FireWire

FireWire was a proprietary Apple technology which allowed for incredibly fast transfer speeds between devices. Indeed, it was one of the features that made the original iPod so compelling. Beyond that, FireWire was, for a time, the de-facto standard for transferring digital movie footage to Macs.

Unfortunately, Apple ultimately began phasing out FireWire on Macs in 2008 as transitioning to USB expanded the company’s pool of potential users. It’s a shame, though, because USB 2.0, while decent, was vastly inferior to FireWire. The staggered abandonment of FireWire ultimately gave way to Thunderbolt.

View the other seven items… 

DEMO Fall 2014 Conference Wraps Day Two of Launching New Startups — and Crowned DEMO Gods

 DEMO Fall 2014 Conference Wraps Day Two of Launching New Startups — and Crowned DEMO Gods

Technology Innovators and Venture Capitalists Like Matt Rogers, Keith Rabois, Steve Papa Share Knowledge at Tech Launchpad Event

SAN JOSE, CA–(Marketwired – Nov 20, 2014) – DEMO Fall 2014 (www.DEMO.com) today welcomed the launch of another 20 technology products and services focused on solving real-life problems. The conference showcased a hand-selected group of entrepreneurs demonstrating new technologies in the areas of Bitcoin and personal finance, cloud, messaging and the Internet of Things, and setting the pace for future technology. Executives, founders, engineers and investors all gathered at the San Jose Convention Center in San Jose to crown the DEMO Gods.

DEMO God Award™ Winners
The Fall DEMO God Awards are presented to the DEMO Fall companies that exhibit exceptional potential to thrive in the market while inspiring and stimulating the DEMO audience. Congratulations to the following companies that were honored with Fall DEMO God Awards during DEMO Fall 2014:

The Work Cloud: Student Loans (www.goslb.com)
Wearables & Hardware: Curb (www.energycurb.com)
Mobile: PathSense (www.pathsense.com)
Smart Data: Celect (www.celect.net) and Ghostery (www.ghostery.com)
Traction Showcase Winner: Templafy (www.templafy.com)

“We traveled the world, meeting with promising startups to look for solutions that harness emerging technology to tackle big problems,” said DEMO executive producer Erick Schonfeld. “The core concept of creativity is looking at problems in new ways, and that is what we celebrated onstage at DEMO Fall.”

Speaker highlights of day two included key executives as well as “founder judges” who provided critiques and feedback to each demonstrating company:

continue reading… 

Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Year of Accelerating Innovation on 3rd Platform: IDC India

IDC envisions 2015 will be a year of accelerating innovation on the 3rd Platform

Jaideep Mehta, Managing Director, IDC South Asia says, “It has been about two years since organizations started to explore the benefits 3rd Platform technologies could unlock for them. 2015 is finally expected to be a year of widespread adoption of the 3rd Platform – Social, Mobile, Cloud and Big Data. IDC expects the businesses to move from a saturated 2nd Platform to a now thriving 3rd Platform era. Recovering markets, growing capabilities and innovating leaders will act as catalyst during this transition phase making 2015 a significantly positive year for the India IT eco-system.”

IDC revised IT spending growth in the Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) (APeJ) region down from 8.7% to 5.8% in 2014 followed by a very modest increase to 6.0% in 2015. IT spending growth for the rest of the 2014-2018 forecast period is expected to climb upwards to 6.4% in 2017.

IDC expects the APeJ region to remain a most reliable engine for growth with multinational companies (MNCs) and Asian enterprises alike continuing to relentlessly look to Asia for future opportunities.

More insights will be revealed in a forthcoming report, “IDC Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan) ICT 2015 Top 10 Predictions”.

Drawing from the latest IDC research and internal brainstorming sessions amongst IDC’s regional and country analysts, the following are the top 10 key ICT predictions in 2015 that IDC believes will have the biggest commercial impact on the APeJ ICT market.

1) US$15 billion of government funding in 2015 will turn ICT plans into battlefields innovators

In 2015, IDC expects government ICT investments to be focused on the consolidation and streamlining of scarce ICT resources, the attainment of better management tools for effective decision making, and cyber-security.

In the next two to three years, IDC expects several regional authorities to utilize new sourcing models for transformational ICT, such as 3rd Platform technologies (i.e. cloud, Big Data/ analytics, mobility and social), continued Smart City programs, connected smart machines and intelligent sensors (i.e. edge computing), and the Internet of Things (IoT).

2) 60% of enterprises in 2015 will structure IT into core vs Lines of Business (LoB) IT

In 2015, IDC predicts that 60% of enterprises will structure their IT departments into two functional groups: Core IT and a separate LoB IT function. For larger organizations, these groups will become physically distinct entities, but for most Asia/Pacific enterprises this separation will be logical, as the two kinds of roles will be distinctly different but the reporting structure may not differ.

3) The software-defined battle lines will get defined in 2015

The hybrid cloud, or federated datacenter, is still the current architecture of choice for organizations trying to align their IT infrastructure to the demands of the business.

Looking ahead to 2015 and based on the IDC Asia/Pacific Transformative Infrastructure (TI) Index, between 20-25% of all organizations will already have adopted Software-Defined Networking (SDN), Software-Defined Storage (SDS), or Software-Defined Datacenter (SDDC) to deliver on their hybrid cloud architecture (such as automation, showback and service catalog capabilities) across the region.

4) The agile development team will be in high demand in 2015 with growth in DevOps adoptions

IDC’s IT Services Survey found that 45% of businesses are undergoing or planning to undergo application modernization projects. Their ability to scale up 3rd Platform adoption will require changes to IT operation that bring agility and overcome siloed legacy systems. This need for speed will bring the first big wave of DevOps adoption in the region and will make agile development the de facto norm.

Continue reading…