Upcoming Events
Event Date Location

OMMA Display In LA

07/22/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA Audience Targeting @ Advertising Week

07/23/2014 Los Angeles CA

Small Agency Conference & Awards

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Austin TX

Strategic Advertising Sales Training 

07/23/2014 - 07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

OMMA RTB Real-Time Buying

07/24/2014 Los Angeles CA

CIO Perspectives Boston 

08/06/2014 Boston MA

IT Roadmap Conference & Expo

08/06/2014 New York NY

OMMA mCommerce

08/07/2014 New York New York

lead-generation

Subscribe To Latest Posts
Subscribe

How to win followers and influence journalism: lessons from journalists with the most followers on Twitter

Muck Rack

In the Mid-Year Social Journalism Report, Muck Rack CEO Greg Galant ranked the broadcast and print/online journalists with the most followers on Twitter. With more than 5 million followers, Anderson Cooper ranks far ahead of all other journalists. Several standout journalists boast over 2 million followers at press time: Rachel MaddowLarry KingChris HardwickAdam Schefter, and Bill Simmons.

We aren’t all aiming for millions of followers. But even if we start with an audience of dozens or hundreds of followers, we can look to the Twitter habits and strategies of these most-followed journalists for tips on gaining more followers and readers for our work.

Using the ForSight social media analytics platform, built by Crimson Hexagon (full disclosure: I work there), to monitor tweeting and engagement tactics and trends, distinct patterns of highly successful journalists on Twitter emerge. These patterns suggest that visibility through high-profile jobs like Anderson Cooper’s gig at CNN aren’t they only thing separating most followed journalists from the rest of the pack. For this study, I analyzed the activity around the Twitter handles of the five print/online journalists with the most followers as of June 2014 (Adam Schefter, Bill Simmons, Arianna Huffington,David Pogue, and Nicholas Kristof) from January 1, 2014 to July 4, 2014.

There are plenty of ways to gain followers aside from having a daily gig on a major television station, including getting widely retweeted, inspiring people to mention you when they share your work and participating in conversations that are important to your audience.

Here are five concrete lessons I took from my analysis of highly-followed journalists that you can incorporate into your approach to tweeting and using Twitter in your journalistic work to gain a larger audience and more influence: 

1. Tweet Every Day. Regular engagement is the key. If you want to build your follower count, put out Tweets every day. Think of Twitter like a Giga Pet, those electronic toys back in the day that needed to be fed and watered. Each of the five exhibit peaks and valleys in sending Tweets, but send them they do – nearly every single day, weekends included.

2. Send a Flurry of Tweets About Events. Intensify your Twitter presence around events related to your beat or expertise. Each of the journalists’ owned media profiles on Twitter exhibited significant daily activity, as well as distinct spikes in sent Tweets and engagement, including mentions and Retweets, around events.

For example, Arianna Huffington’s Twitter handle saw its most engagement on a single day on Mother’s Day, a day when @ariannahuff Tweeted actively. With 360 million total possible impressions from Tweets and Retweets in one day, you can be sure @ariannahuff picked up new followers as a result of her Mother’s Day Tweets.

Bill Simmons saw a burst of engagement in late April of this year when he Tweeted 22 times about Donald Sterling, Adam Silver, and the NBA from April 26-29. During that time, an on-location Tweet from the Clippers game garnered 2,422 Retweets. Over four days, @BillSimmons added 6,000 new followers.

Continue reading

Twitter Is Cracking Down On Companies That Provide Stats About Its Users

Business Insider

Twitter has taken the unusual step of shutting off its datapipe to certain companies that have published their own stats on how big Twitter’s user base really is, according to two sources.

The move comes after Twitter’s stock was hammered in the early part of the year when investors discovered growth in monthly active users (MAUs) was slowing or stagnant, and that measures of engagement per user were on the decline.

Since then, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo has ordered a revamp of the Twitter user interface in order to make it easier and more attractive for people to use. He also reshuffled his management ranks, getting rid of a COO with largely financial background and replacing him with a product chief from Google.

At the same time, Twitter’s stock price rose nicely. Some analysts see it hitting $60 a share (see disclosure below).

But third-party companies that published their own measures of Twitter’s user base were a thorn in Twitter’s side. While Costolo touted the company’s growth to 255 million MAUs, Business Insider was able to report that the number was only a fraction of the 1 billion people who had tried Twitter.

Most people who sign up for Twitter abandon it, it seems. Also, most people on Twitter don’t tweet, according to third-party apps that accessed Twitter’s data firehose.

Now, companies that used to provide that data have been axed from Twitter’s application programming interface (API), the firehose of data that software development companies can plug into in order to build useful products for Twitter and its users.

Twitter declined to comment when reached by Business Insider.

We don’t know why Twitter has begun culling developers from its API, but one theory might be that it has nothing to do with wanting to restrict who sees user data. Rather, Twitter has been slowly building a very nice data business of its own, which will probably book $100 million in revenue this year. The company may simply have decided it is time to end the free ride for developers who give away for free what Twitter would rather charge for.

“They shut me down last Friday night after the market closed,” one developer told Business Insider.

 

 

Sharing On Twitter And Pinterest Leans Mostly Mobile

MediaPost

By now it’s clear that mobile and social have become more than a shotgun marriage.Findings from comScore last month showed that more than 70% of time spent in social media takes place on mobile devices (including tablets). And total mobile engagement on social is up 55% in the last year.

In its latest quarterly report, ShareThis took a closer look at sharing activity among top social platforms on mobile. Twitter and Pinterest emerge as the most mobile-centric networks, with 75% of all content sharing on those platforms happening in mobile. By comparison, half of sharing activity on Facebook is mobile.

However, because of Facebook’s size (1 billion monthly mobile users), it accounts for 72% of sharing on smartphones, versus 14% for Twitter, and 12% for Pinterest. On tablets, Facebook’s share falls to 64%, and Twitter’s to 7%, while Pinterest sees a bump to 22%. “There is a clear preference for channels based on different devices. Pinners are more active on tablets whereas tweeters flock to smartphones,” states ShareThis blog post today.

Furthermore, Facebook is where people go to share content about politics and parenting, while Twitter — because of its real-time DNA — leans toward sports and business, and Pinterest sharing is focused on shopping. That’s a natural outgrowth of Pinterest’s emphasis on visual presentation and consumer products.

In that vein, mobile users are twice as likely to interact with desktop content as any other category.

When it comes to mobile operating systems, Android users are more active on Facebook, while iOS users are more likely to share material on Twitter and Pinterest. In terms of demographic trends, sharing on tablets among people 55 and over nearly doubled over the first quarter. And 43% of social activity on tablets is driven by people in that age group.

Social interaction on mobile devices also grew 13% among African-Americans and 6% among Hispanics in the quarter. Overall, sharing from smartphones and tablets grew more than 30%, while that on the desktop fell 5% between the first and second quarter. The mobile gain was driven mainly by activity on smartphones, which was up about 28%.

Across desktop and mobile, Facebook accounted for almost two-thirds (64%) of sharing, with Twitter and Pinterest each claiming 9%. But the two smaller competitors together gained 2% share on Facebook from the prior quarter.

The Best Tactics to Generate More Leads from Facebook and Twitter

SocialMedia Today

Social Media is a great way to connect, share and interact with others beyond the known periphery. Savvy business people are interested to explore this opportunity and reach maximum number of potential customers via social media. You will come across many online blogs discussing the best ways to enhance your social media reach. We will not delve into that same matter further. Our focus will be on something else…… Lead Generation.

Likes, pins, followers, comments, friends, and engagement- these are popular social media metrics. But, what is more vital to consider whether such metrics result on sales at the end of the day? Otherwise, all of them are completely useless.

Change your perspective

One of the biggest misconceptions about social media sites is that they are just only for brand awareness and not for generating leads. If you consider the same, your business is missing out a lucrative marketing channel.

Instead, of getting distracted with the counts of Facebook “likes “and Twitter “followers”, focus on the statistics that can contribute to your revenue. It will be impossible to track ROI, if your organization’s social media strategy is not constructed to support lead generation. It is high time to change your outlook and concentrate on generating social media leads.

If you are planning to start a lead generation campaign, Facebook and Twitter profiles are great places to begin with. Here are a few tips that you should consider to generate leads from these two well-known social media profiles:

Facebook

There are 1.2 billion active monthly users on Facebook and therefore, this channel is the prime focus of the business owners. However, this platform is often not conducive for direct sales, but by distributing quality content and engaging with the customers in one-to-one communication it possible to build trust among the Facebook users. What else you can do to generate leads from this popular channel? Let’s see-

Attracting the customers

First, it is important to understand the kind of information your potential customers are looking for. Sweepstakes, contests and group offers on your Facebook page are good to attract the attention of the customers. Do you remember “Do Us a Flavor” campaign from Lay’s? The brand just asked for a new flavor that the customers may like in their chips. The idea was simple and it clicked. This campaign generated huge publicity and the brand has no doubt gained lots of new customers.

Try to know your customers

You should also think about the information that you might like to know from your customers. It will be easier for you to convert your visitors into lead once you are equipped with more information about them. For that, you may use Facebook tab to ask them few simple questions. However, a social media user does not like these tabs and rarely visit them. You have to think of ways to encourage a visitor to fill up the questionnaire. A giveaway or offer can be enticing and works well to gather customer insights. You can also reveal the content of your website, if the user is ready to fill the signup form. Always try to keep such forms concise with minimum questions. You may ask for email address, demographic data or geographic location information. But, before that, customize your tab and make it brand related.

Continue reading

With Revenue Roaring, Twitter’s Advertising Team Is Untouched by Turmoil

The New York Times

Twitter‘s top executive ranks have been transformed in the last year, from its general counsel to, most recently, its chief financial officer.

Many of the executives have left or been pushed out as Twitter’s chief executive, Dick Costolo, has brought in a new team to try to increase sluggish user growth at the social network.

But in one very important area of the company — Twitter’s ad business — the leadership has remained relatively untouched.

Adam Bain, Twitter’s global president of revenue and partnerships, has been Twitter’s lead money man since he took the job nearly four years ago. A former executive at Fox Sports Media Group, Mr. Bain came to Twitter to oversee the development of the company’s then nascent advertising products.

In the reorganization after the resignation of Twitter’s No. 2 executive, Ali Rowghani, last month, Mr. Bain also took over control of business development. His role atop the moneymaking machine suggests that he might very well be the second most important person at the company after Mr. Costolo.

Before Twitter began selling sponsored tweets and other ad products in 2010, the company had very little revenue, most deriving from licensing deals with companies like Google andMicrosoft.

Now Twitter frequently runs sponsored video clips, one of the top social media ad products connected to live televised events, and it is rapidly building out its mobile presence, including challenging Facebook’s dominance in mobile app installation ads. This year,Twitter has said, it expects to post $1.2 billion to $1.25 billion in revenue, nearly double the $665 million it took in last year, although the company expects to continue to report net losses.

Along with enlarging the business and courting big advertisers and TV networks, Mr. Bain has poached numerous advertising veterans from technology companies across Silicon Valley to add to his team at Twitter.

Google has been a favorite target. Richard Alfonsi left Google in 2012 to lead the efforts to target small- and medium-size businesses, while Shailesh Rao and Stephen McIntyre left Google earlier that year to head Twitter’s Asian and European advertising sales efforts.

Mr. Bain’s top colleague, Kevin Weil, has also risen to prominence. Beginning his career at Twitter as an engineer managing much of the company’s analytics, Mr. Weil quickly moved to the ad side and was promoted three times. He is now vice president for revenue products at the company and is also becoming deeply involved in some nonadvertisement products, such as the hosting and automatic previewing of video clips on the site.

Under Mr. Bain, Twitter has also acquired MoPub andTapCommerce, two start-ups that were in the business of serving advertisements to users of other mobile apps. Even if Twitter’s user growth continues to wane, the thinking goes, the company can still lift its bottom line by selling mobile ads that run in places other than its flagship service.

Continue reading

Study: Twitter actually is helping your TV campaign

Digiday

Twitter’s pitch that its ads amplify brands’ messages beyond TV is now supported by agency-backed research.

The company, in conjunction with Starcom Mediavest Group, released on Tuesday the results of a six-month study into the effectiveness of pairing TV and Twitter ads, the upshot of which is that Twitter users are more receptive to advertising than the typical TV viewer and that pairing Twitter and TV makes for some powerful brand advertising.

Twitter-supported TV campaigns deliver a 50 percent greater ROI than TV-only campaigns, SMG’s Kate Sirkin said. Brand awareness was 6.9 percent higher among audiences to such campaigns while households exhibited a 4 percent increase in sales versus TV alone. Favorability rose 6 percent for users who interacted with a promoted tweet, meanwhile.

Curiously, Twitter president of global revenue Adam Bain was not using the study as evidence for why brands need to transition their ad dollars from TV to digital. Rather, the study should entice some brands to migrate “underperforming” digital dollars to TV (and Twitter).

“When you run both TV and Twitter together, we actually think budgets can go from the digital side to TV,” Bain told Digiday on Tuesday in Cannes. “Spending on Twitter makes your digital outcomes go farther, but your TV outcomes go farther as well.”

Bain positioning Twitter as the “bridge” between digital and TV makes it an alluring ad platform for brands looking to test whether their TV budgets might be better spent than solely on TV spots.

But that message is also integral for Twitter’s ad business, and thus the health of its business in general going forward. Twitter’s response to Wall Street worries about its decelerating user growth has been to emphasize that Twitter’s influence extends far beyond Twitter itself. That may well be true for celebrities taking selfies, but a promoted tweet is not as likely to generate the same kind of press coverage. And perhaps more damning was when an NBC exec said this April that Twitter had no effect on boosting ratings.

Continue reading

Screen Shot 2014 07 08 at 1.32.26 PM Study: Twitter actually is helping your TV campaign

Brandnew’s Back-Door Approach To Native Advertising

AdExchanger

Everyone wants to get into native advertising, yet everyone has a different definition as to what exactly that entails. Social media sites have it easy because any sponsored post, automatically blending into the site design, can hitch a ride on the native bandwagon.

But while Facebook and Twitter are the current hotbeds of social advertising, Instagram and Pinterest are coming up fast. But unlike Facebook and Twitter, advertising around the two image-based interfaces revolves heavily around influencers, instead of traditional paid placements.

Berlin-based Brandnew IO, which began in early 2013, provides a platform and service designed to help brands reach influencers on Instagram and Pinterest.

“At that time we saw that more and more brands and agencies wanted to reach new consumers,” said Brandnew CEO Francis Trapp. “They wanted to target groups on platforms like Instagram and at the time there was no central way of doing it.”

At first, Brandnew identified influencers manually but it soon developed a platform designed to automate the process and handles campaign tracking. That being said, Brandnew’s staff still needs to vet the influencers for quality.

“We check to ensure these influential people are worth taking onboard,” Trapp said. “We determine if they have big enough accounts and real followers as opposed to fake followers. We ensure that the quality of their content is suitable for our brands.”

Trapp spoke with AdExchanger.

AdExchanger: Brandnew pushes brand-produced images out for influencers to share. Is that actually native advertising?

FRANCIS TRAPP: We see ourselves as a company that connects brands with influential people. Obviously we also need to consult brands on what works for them on these social channels. Sometimes our clients have a very clear idea of what the campaign should look like, but sometimes they have no idea.

One thing we have to ensure is that the campaigns we run are interesting for all parties involved. On one hand this means that the client should run a campaign with an image that really represents their brand. On the other hand, the influencer should make sure that image is distributed to the right accounts. Our influencers always tell us that they want to run campaigns that don’t annoy their followers. That’s the main hurdle to native advertising.

Sometimes we see that certain clients of ours view Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest as social media and nothing more. We are convinced that each platform has a unique DNA, and the way people use each one differs. Typical demographics of Pinterest users differ from Instagram users. This has to be reflected in the campaigns we launch for the brands we represent.

Read more…

10 Tips For Building A Community On Twitter

MediaBistro

If a tweet is sent and no one is around to read it, does it make an impact? This isn’t a philosophical question: the answer is resoundingly “no.”

If you’re not part of a community on Twitter, you’re likely not seeing any real engagement with your content. Here are ten tips for building a community that will add value to your Twitter experience.

1. Tweet consistently

This applies to both timing and topic. The more regularly you tweet throughout the week, and the more on-topic you are (whichever topic that may be), the more targeted followers you will attract.

2. Be helpful

Give before you ask. Offer to help someone – whether they have asked a question, need a favor or they are simply new to Twitter – and they will remember you. Do this enough times, and you’ll build a loyal following of folks who know where to turn when they need something.

3. Search for them

Use Twitter’s advanced search or a Twitter directory to search for people that you’d like in your community. You can search by topic, keyword and more to discover who’s tweeting about the things you’re interested in. Then, follow a handful of these accounts each day, and you’ll be surprised by how many follow you back!

4. Leverage existing connections

You probably already have an offline community, especially if you’re tweeting on behalf of a business – so use it! Let your in-store customers, the people you email, and everyone you’re connected to professionally know you tweet by adding your Twitter handle to store signage, your email signature and more.

5. Build a strong brand

Communities flourish where they have a distinct mandate. So if you have a strong brand presence, one that matches your offline or other digital presence, you’ll be more likely to attract and keep followers who are eager to engage with your brand.

6. Know the lingo

Understanding the basics of Twitter is a must when building a community. If you’re unsure of what RT or DM means, you can take a look at Twitter’s glossary.

7. Respond to all @replies

No community member likes to be ignored! Don’t forget to respond, in a timely manner, to everyone who interacts with you on Twitter. This will show your community that you are engaged, and not simply using Twitter to broadcast one-way messages.

8. Start a hashtag chat

Hashtag chats are all the rage these days, with brands, celebrities and experts coming together with their communities to discuss a single topic on Twitter. Chats can be one-off, or they can be scheduled regularly. They are a great way to build a community, as they promote engagement, networking and learning. We have resources for you if you’re looking to start a hashtag chat, or if you want to just dip your toes in first and join an pre-existing chat.

9. Promote others

Even if you are the center of your community, you won’t last long if all you do is self-promote. Try promoting others by retweeting them, sharing their content and introducing them to one another.

10. Network with influencers

Influencers can amplify your message, and get it in front of a large, targeted, engaged audience. Try building relationships with a handful of influencers in your industry to tap into an even larger community.

As UK Social Networkers Move to Mobile, Marketers Follow

eMarketer

The boom times for social network adoption in the UK look to be largely over, as new user growth is set to slow to a near standstill by 2018. What growth does remain is coming from users expanding their social network activity to mobile devices, according to a new eMarketer report, “UK Social Networking Trends: Mobile Is Becoming the New Normal,” which noted that the proportion of UK social network users who will access their accounts via mobile phone will continue to increase substantially throughout eMarketer’s forecast period, rising from 75.3% in 2014 to 90.2% in 2018.

Social media is an important consideration for marketers in the UK. It has to be, given the sheer size of the audience. But the marketing effectiveness of these networks hasn’t always been rated highly by those in the business. However, as UK consumers move their social networking behaviors to mobile, some marketers are beginning to move their efforts along with them.

Real-time social engagement, mainly enabled by access via mobile devices, is top of mind for many UK marketers.

Results from a February 2014 study by immediate future, a social media consultancy, indicated just how many benefits UK marketers felt real-time social engagement could offer. While general audience engagement was the most cited among respondents, other benefits were noteworthy—for example, 35% felt real-time social engagement brought increased customer retention and loyalty, while 25% credited it with a better return on investment.

In terms of hard figures, mobile ad revenues are becoming increasingly important to social networks. Facebook’s recent earnings call illustrated this quite starkly: In Q1 2014, the company saw a 72% year-over-year rise in total global revenues, driven by mobile, which accounted for 59% of ad revenues during the same period—up from 30% a year prior, the company said.

eMarketer projections further highlight the importance of mobile social advertising. Net mobile internet ad revenues worldwide for both Facebook and Twitter will essentially double between 2013 and 2014. A look further back to 2012 puts the growth in mobile ad spending further into perspective. At $6.82 billion, Facebook’s mobile ad revenues in 2014 will be 14 times higher than they were just two years prior.

Continue reading

6 reasons why media companies should be more obsessed with technology

The Media Briefing

At the PPA’s Reinvented conference last week, The Drum reported DC Thomson CEO Ellis Watson saying that “publishers must remember to focus on their core offering and get back to basics” and the “obsession” with technology was “getting ridiculous.”

There’s no doubt that publishers need to get “the basics” right, but in the internet age both good content and good technology are necessary, if not sufficient, requirements for a media business that wants to still be here in 10 years time. If anything, publishers are nowhere near obsessed enough about getting the technology right, and here are six examples why:

1. Half your lunch has already been eaten by tech companies

Watson was also quoted as saying:

“Don’t believe what the voices of the technologists and futurologists that say that digital is the imminent future for our business. It’s a fantastic complement, but it’s not the replacement of it, nor the killer of it.”

Let’s set aside for the moment the debate about whether the future will be entirely digital (though it will be), and focus on digital’s impact so far. You don’t need to look far to see one area where better digital technology has already killed a big part of the media business – all you need to do is look at the impact Google has had on classifieds revenue.

While total print advertising is still falling, classifieds fell off a cliff long ago. That’s hit newspapers, specialist magazine titles and, of course, the company once known as Yellow Pages. The primary culprit is Google (as well as sites such as eBay and Craigslist), simply because it came up with a more efficient way to find the specific service or purchase you were looking for.

If a disruptive force can use digital to kill of one formerly huge chunk of your business, is it really wise to assume it won’t happen again? An ad-focused publisher may not be saved by better technology in areas such as programmatic trading or high-impact formats, but without it your chances of riding out another innovative disrupter are slim to none.

2. Consumers are already using the best tech, and they’re your competitors

Publishers are going to have a very very hard time competing with the likes of Facebook and Twitter when it comes to clever investment in and development of technology. But that’s fine because you can use their platforms to reach your audience, right?

Yes, except for one big caveat. Platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Medium all allow anyone to access that same audience, and they get to work with the same tools as everyone else. The more sophisticated these platforms get, the easier it is for the average joe in the street to create good content that can find an audience and compete for its time. And when that happens, the ad money is going to go to the platforms, not the publishers.

Continue reading