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Coming soon to Facebook: Video ads that follow you from device to device

VentureBeat

Advertisers on Facebook see the emerging method of sequential mobile advertising as a way to better control their branding message with consumers on social media.

Sequential video advertising allows marketers to place targeted video ads in front of a user when they click an ad on their mobile device. Based on what the person clicks, and what the product or message is, marketers are then able to follow up with similar video ads as they hop from one device to another.

By creating a sequence of targeted ads, marketers can build up a pitch from one video to the next — starting with a “pitch” video and ending with a “sell” video intended to close the sale.

VentureBeat spoke to two sources who requested their names not be used because the information they were describing was based in conversations with Facebook executives.

“Video is where its going,” an advertising executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat. “With unique profile IDs, you have the ability to better sequentially target content for users as they embark on their journey through the social media funnel.”

The same executive added: “Sequential video advertisers gives marketers the ability to place different messages that can build upon each other. This gives you greater control over the delivery of your message.”

Another mobile executive who works with Facebook told VentureBeat that advertisers want to better control, and deploy, product messages. But they are content, for now, in permitting Facebook and others obtain user data to target their ads.

For its part, Facebook uses a combination of its own in-house analytics and partners for the task of ad targeting.

Facebook is able to amass tremendous amounts of user data based on information contained in in its users’ profiles as well as their activity. That includes information on who you interact with and where you like to shop, for example. That data is gold to advertisers, keen to take advantage of Facebook’s 1.2 billion users.

“The writing is on the wall. Sequentially targeted ads are hugely efficient and ultimately cost effective. They have greater relevance for advertisers and better targeting,” said the second source, who has knowledge of Facebook’s mobile ad strategy.

“Anecdotally, it’s very promising. Facebook is putting a lot of effort into it,” the same source added.

Indeed, Facebook bought the video advertising outfit Liverail for an undisclosed sum earlier this month. Liverail’s technology optimizes video ad deliveries for mobile devices utilizing bidding and proprietary data. Liverail was considering an IPO this year but threw in its lot with Facebook instead, media reports said.

Read more…

World Tech Update- July 17, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU Microsoft announces lay off plans, IBM and Apple team up and Google tests out Project Tango in space.

2014 B2B Technology Content Marketing Trends: Content Marketing Budget, Outsourcing and Challenges

Content Marketing Institute’s newest research report, B2B Content Marketing: 2014 Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends- North America, gives insight into what technology marketers are using content marketing for. This research, sponsored by International Data group (IDG), focuses on key differences between the most effective technology marketers and their less effective peers.  Watch this video on content marketing budgets, outsourcing and challenges.  

For the full report, click here

Click here to view an INFOGRAPHIC on this research

 

Putting the Spotlight on the Mobile Evolution

Digital Marketing Magazine

A new Global Mobile Survey, from IDG Global Solutions (IGS), has put a spotlight on the evolution of mobile in the biggest study of consumer and business’ use of mobile devices.

The survey highlights a dramatic increase in mobile video consumption with 74% of consumers use a smartphone to watch online videos compared with 61% in 2012. Additionally, mobile is replacing traditional media as 50% of respondents use a tablet to read newspapers and 40% have replaced either the desktop or laptop with a tablet device.

The boundaries between business and personal life are becoming increasingly blurred as 80% of all respondents research products or services for business on a tablet in the evening. However, a lack of mobile enabled websites and concerns about security remain the biggest barriers to the growth of purchases on smartphone.

The survey, conducted among more than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries, focuses on four key areas:

Mobile Executives: How executives use mobile devices – especially for business

Mobile Business: How and when audiences research and purchase products on mobile devices

Mobile Millennials vs. Generation X: Differences in consumer behaviour across video, social and commerce

Mobile Lifestyle: How audiences use multiple screens, socialise and buy on mobile devices

The research also reveals that video consumption has become pervasive on mobile devices with 75% of respondents using smartphones and 87% tablets to watch online video. Millennials and C-Suite executives meanwhile are near equal consumers of tablet video with 92% of 18- to 24-year-olds while 91% of senior executive (CEO/COO/Chairman/President) reporting they watch video on their tablet. Both audiences access all kinds of video content, including YouTube, movies, TV shows and training guides, although senior executives are twice as likely as Millennials to watch promotional videos.

Christina Carstensen, IDG Global Solutions, said: “The ‘mobile evolution’ is having a profound effect on consumers and businesses. It has kick-started the ‘always-on’ culture, presenting brands with unprecedented opportunities to develop closer relationships with their customers. We have moved beyond media convergence to a convergence of technology and humans, and brands more than ever need to show their human side to communicate in a relevant, engaging and intuitive way.”

Mobile Executives

For senior executives, smartphones are a critical business tool. The majority of senior executives (92%) own a smartphone used for business with 77% reporting they use their smartphone to research a product or service for their business. While the majority (93%) go on to purchase that product via the Internet using a laptop or desktop, 50% of these executives have purchased IT products for business using their smartphone with 13% reporting making a purchase between $1,000 to $4,999 USD. (£600–2,999; €700–3,499).

Security concerns (45%) and having a website not mobile enabled (43%) were the most common reasons for this audience not to purchase a product via smartphone. Like mainstream consumers, senior executives want an omni-channel purchase environment to seamlessly move between devices to make IT purchases.

Mobile for Business

Tablet ownership has exploded among survey respondents rising from 20% in 2011 to 61% in 2014. In Latin America, 41% of respondents said their tablet had replaced their laptop computer with 59% reporting using their tablet device to purchase IT products for their business, the highest percentage of all regions surveyed. Software and computer accessories were the IT products most frequently purchased for business across all regions, reflecting significant opportunity for IT companies willing to invest in mobile commerce innovations such as shoppable video.

Millennials vs. Generation X

Nearly all respondents aged 18-34 owned a smartphone and 91% of 18-24 year olds and 85% of 25-34 year olds used social networking sites and apps on their smartphone. Only 38% of 18-24 year olds owned a tablet, however. Tablet ownership jumps to 55% among 25 to 34 year olds and 65% report using another device or screen, primarily television (83%) at the same time as their tablet.

To reach these audiences, tech marketers are now competing with mainstream brands on Facebook or trying to grab their audience’s attention during television programs. B2B brands investing in quality social content or video with high production values comparable to television are most likely to engage young influencers and stimulate social media shares.

Mobile Tech Lifestyle: Multitasking

The majority of Global Mobile Survey respondents are multitasking: 61% use another device at the same times as their tablet and 58% use another device at the same time as their smartphone. In both cases the majority of activity on these devices is unrelated.

 

How marketers can navigate the new ‘over the top’ video ecosystem

Digiday

Consuming video content is a very different experience today than it was five years ago, with many more options beyond traditional cable. For one, watching a video online is now a reliable, easy and truly mobile experience, due to the strength of broadband infrastructure. Content is now legally available over the Internet from a variety of “over the top” services (OTT), services like Netflix, Hulu, HBO Go and Amazon Instant Video, to name a few.

Cued by the greater number of alternative options, cable subscribers and advertisers are turning a critical eye to traditional video distribution. Transforming the cable industry by leveraging OTT technologies and new business models will create happier consumers, more profitable advertising, and a more efficient system overall. Here’s how:

OTT enables cable-free content
OTT refers to delivery of video, audio and other media over the Internet without a traditional pay-TV operator or free-to-air broadcaster being involved in the control or distribution of the content. OTT allows a consumer to watch a single program or episode easily. Originally, OTT video was streamed to PCs. It’s now delivered via set-top boxes such as Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Amazon Fire TV or via game consoles. This move has happened in parallel with increasing consumption of media on mobile devices.

The distinguishing factor for OTT is the degree to which cable companies participate. In the traditional model, a cable company sells both content and distribution channels. However, in the OTT model, a third party (like Netflix) sells the content, and the consumer uses the Internet (which they purchased from a cable company) to access it. The name over the top refers to the fact that content distribution occurs “on top” of existing infrastructure.

OTT is changing consumer behavior
Consumers can now reliably access their content wherever they can access the Internet, and they have shown that they are happy to pay for the privilege. While there is still a prime time for television consumption, viewers are the ones setting the schedule and choosing what they watch, not cable providers.

Due to the increased number of legal options, the development of set-top boxes like the Roku 3 and the ever-rising costs of cable, many consumers are opting to become “cord cutters” — severing ties with their cable companies and enjoying all of their media through OTT services. And we’re even seeing the emergence of “cord nevers” who choose to go completely TV-free.

Click to continue reading

More than half of 25 to 34-year olds have a tablet, says new research

CNET

Tablets are replacing computers, according to new figures, as we voraciously eat up online video from YouTube to Netflix.

Industry analysts IDG polled 23,500 people across 43 countries about their use of mobile devices. The survey focuses on the habits of business executives as well as comparing the behaviour of members of generation X — people roughly in their thirties to fifties — with younger millenials, who largely grew up with the Internet.

Nearly everybody surveyed owned a smartphone. Older people are more likely to own a tablet: more than half of 25 to 34-year olds have an iPad or similar device, but only a third of 18 to 24-year olds can say the same.

40 percent of those surveyed have replaced their desktop computer or laptop with a tablet. They don’t just use their tablet for checking Facebook and watching cat videos on YouTube: a whopping 80 percent admit to using their tablet for work-related research in the evenings.

Video tasty

IDG highlights the explosion in video watched on mobile devices in recent years, including phones and tablets. Three quarters of respondents use a smartphone to watch online videos, up from 61 per cent in 2012.

One of the reasons the growth in mobile video watching is significant is that video requires more data sent to a device — especially if it’s in high definition — which uses more bandwidth. As a result, mobile phone networks reckon video puts a strain on their network.

During the World Cup, for example, soccer fans have turned to their phones or tablets to follow games kicking off at times when they’re at work or out of the house. EE, the UK’s first 4G network, saw record traffic generated by streaming online video. The biggest spikes involved coverage of England’s ill-fated game against Uruguay and replays of Australian superstar Tim Cahill’s stunning volleyed goal against Holland.

Despite these figures on tablet use, other analysts have suggested that tablet sales could be impacted by phablets, as consumers plump for a smartphone with a video-friendly larger screen rather than buying a phone and tablet separately.

IDG World Tech Update- June 6, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Google wants to be everywhere, the Supreme Court rules cell phones are private during an arrest and technology helps a quadriplegic regain use of his hands.

 

Are you watching carefully? The importance of video completion rates

The Media Briefing

Video completion rates are an important metric in the attempt to gauge whether you’re making the right videos, and whether you’re going to be able to make money out of those videos.

Coull, a UK ad-tech startup looked at 12.4 million video plays across 60 countries during May to find the video categories that had the highest completion rates.

On a UK level, the cars and vehicles video category had the highest completion rate – 61.1 percent. The people and blogs category came second, with just over half the videos being watched to the end (52 percent), while travel and events came third, with 51.3 percent being watched all the way through.

However, for all those newspaper websites ploughing time into video content, there’s some worrying news. Only 43 percent of news and politics videos were watched through to the end – lower than the UK category average completion rate of 43.5 percent.

Screen Shot 2014 06 26 at 1.32.33 PM Are you watching carefully? The importance of video completion rates

On a global level, things are quite different, however. The news and politics category received the highest completion rates, with 62.2 percent – just pipping cars and vehicles to the top spot, which received 62.1 percent. The category average for completion rates on the global stage was also 43.5 percent.

The how-to & style, music, and gaming categories didn’t manage to hold viewers’ attentions particularly well, with completion rates at 35.8, 28.8, and 23 percent, respectively.

Continue reading

Putting the Spotlight on the Mobile Evolution

Digital Marketing Magazine

A new Gloval Mobile Survey, from IDG Global Solutions (IGS), has put a spotlight on the evolution of mobile in the biggest study of consumer and business’ use of mobile devices.

The survey highlights a dramatic increase in mobile video consumption with 74% of consumers use a smartphone to watch online videos compared with 61% in 2012. Additionally, mobile is replacing traditional media as 50% of respondents use a tablet to read newspapers and 40% have replaced either the desktop or laptop with a tablet device.

The boundaries between business and personal life are becoming increasingly blurred as 80% of all respondents research products or services for business on a tablet in the evening. However, a lack of mobile enabled websites and concerns about security remain the biggest barriers to the growth of purchases on smartphone.

The survey, conducted among more than 23,500 executives and consumers across 43 countries, focuses on four key areas:

Mobile Executives: How executives use mobile devices – especially for business

Mobile Business: How and when audiences research and purchase products on mobile devices

Mobile Millennials vs. Generation X: Differences in consumer behaviour across video, social and commerce

Mobile Lifestyle: How audiences use multiple screens, socialise and buy on mobile devices

The research also reveals that video consumption has become pervasive on mobile devices with 75% of respondents using smartphones and 87% tablets to watch online video. Millennials and C-Suite executives meanwhile are near equal consumers of tablet video with 92% of 18- to 24-year-olds while 91% of senior executive (CEO/COO/Chairman/President) reporting they watch video on their tablet. Both audiences access all kinds of video content, including YouTube, movies, TV shows and training guides, although senior executives are twice as likely as Millennials to watch promotional videos.

Christina Carstensen, IDG Global Solutions, said: “The ‘mobile evolution’ is having a profound effect on consumers and businesses. It has kick-started the ‘always-on’ culture, presenting brands with unprecedented opportunities to develop closer relationships with their customers. We have moved beyond media convergence to a convergence of technology and humans, and brands more than ever need to show their human side to communicate in a relevant, engaging and intuitive way.”

Mobile Executives

For senior executives, smartphones are a critical business tool. The majority of senior executives (92%) own a smartphone used for business with 77% reporting they use their smartphone to research a product or service for their business. While the majority (93%) go on to purchase that product via the Internet using a laptop or desktop, 50% of these executives have purchased IT products for business using their smartphone with 13% reporting making a purchase between $1,000 to $4,999 USD. (£600–2,999; €700–3,499).

Security concerns (45%) and having a website not mobile enabled (43%) were the most common reasons for this audience not to purchase a product via smartphone. Like mainstream consumers, senior executives want an omni-channel purchase environment to seamlessly move between devices to make IT purchases.

Mobile for Business

Tablet ownership has exploded among survey respondents rising from 20% in 2011 to 61% in 2014. In Latin America, 41% of respondents said their tablet had replaced their laptop computer with 59% reporting using their tablet device to purchase IT products for their business, the highest percentage of all regions surveyed. Software and computer accessories were the IT products most frequently purchased for business across all regions, reflecting significant opportunity for IT companies willing to invest in mobile commerce innovations such as shoppable video.

Millennials vs. Generation X

Nearly all respondents aged 18-34 owned a smartphone and 91% of 18-24 year olds and 85% of 25-34 year olds used social networking sites and apps on their smartphone. Only 38% of 18-24 year olds owned a tablet, however. Tablet ownership jumps to 55% among 25 to 34 year olds and 65% report using another device or screen, primarily television (83%) at the same time as their tablet.

To reach these audiences, tech marketers are now competing with mainstream brands on Facebook or trying to grab their audience’s attention during television programs. B2B brands investing in quality social content or video with high production values comparable to television are most likely to engage young influencers and stimulate social media shares.

Mobile Tech Lifestyle: Multitasking

The majority of Global Mobile Survey respondents are multitasking: 61% use another device at the same times as their tablet and 58% use another device at the same time as their smartphone. In both cases the majority of activity on these devices is unrelated.

Click to see more

World Tech Update- June 12, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU this week Samsung debuts a new tablet, Sony and Microsoft battle for console supremacy and Pepper the robot helps out shoppers.