Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

IT Expo

01/27/2015 - 01/30/2015 Miami Beach FL

Distributech

02/03/2015 - 02/05/2015 San Diego CA

Digital Summit Phoenix

02/04/2015 - 02/05/2015 Acottsdale AZ

Mobile World Congress

03/02/2015 - 03/05/2015 Barcelona .

IDC Directions 2015 Boston

03/04/2015 San Jose CA

IT Roadmap

03/11/2015 Rosemont IL

SXSW 2015

03/13/2015 - 03/21/2015 Austin TX

Enterprise Connect

03/16/2015 - 03/19/2015 Kissimmee FL

IDC Directions 2015 Boston

03/18/2015 boston ma

Agenda 15

03/30/2015 - 04/01/2015 Amelia Island FL

tech-business-marketing

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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Mobile Video Viewing Poised To Take Over By 2016, Ooyala Report Says

MediaPost

Whatever size screen Apple is selling this year, they’re in the ballpark. Mobile screens, small and bigger, are where the viewers are headed, fast.

According to Ooyala’s Q2 Video Index being released today, viewing via mobile devices is destined to make up more than half of all video views by 2016. That’s a little more than just 15 months away.

Mobile — smartphones and tablets — made up 27% of online viewing in June, up from 21%, in February. In the past year, mobile viewing has doubled to become 25% of the total.

Ooyala is not alone in its predictions. Earlier, Cisco predicted (and Ooyala noted) that by 2018, mobile video traffic could make up 69% of the world’s Internet traffic.

This latest Ooyala report amplifies other recent data that show small-screen video is growing big — and not just for short-length content, although that is its dominant use.

All that go-go should keep going, it says, because of the oxymoronic trend toward larger small screens — like the new Apple iPhone 6 and others — that make video viewing on mobile devices better.

Oolyala also points out that there’s just more video available, and faster 4G phone service is more widely available. TV Everywhere service is becoming available, well, everywhere to everyone. Ooyala says in the U.S., it’s estimated that 90% of pay-TVers can access TVE, however, as other mind-blowing stats seem to indicate that you can lead basic cable subscribers to TV Everywhere, but you can’t make them use it.

Read on…

How to choose between the iPhone 6, Plus, and iPad

IDG Connect 0811 300x141 How to choose between the iPhone 6, Plus, and iPad

Like a great many people, I’m planning to pre-order one of the new iPhones on Friday –which you could call both very early Friday morning or very late Thursday night since Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint will all begin taking pre-orders at or just after midnight Pacific a.k.a. 3 a.m. Eastern

I’m still on the fence about whether to order an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus.

I didn’t expect to be on the fence. With so many details known well in advance of Tuesday’s announcement, I’d already written the larger iPhone off as too bulky and ungainly to carry around. Even the size of the iPhone 6 seemed big to me after years with mostly four-inch smartphones. As I wrote earlier this year, I’d developed distinct use cases for my iPhone 5 and iPad mini and presumed two devices that really met my different needs was the way to go.

Then Apple did something unexpected (besides mucking up its live stream of the event). It delivered differing functionality between the two devices. Although most of the specs are the same — the iPad Plus has better camera hardware and, being bigger, sports a bigger battery — the user experience wasn’t.

Some features like Reachability — the ability to have content slide down with a double tap of the home button for easy one-handed operation — extended to both devices. But Apple has also developed ways for the iPhone 6 Plus to make better use of its extra screen real estate. Apple’s built-in apps display more information or content in landscape orientation. The homescreen rotates like on an iPad. Although both devices have a larger keyboard with added buttons for enhanced functionality, the iPhone 6 Plus has more of those added buttons.

Put simply, there is a user interface and user experience difference between the two and I was intrigued enough about the added perks of the iPhone 6 Plus to begin considering it.

Since I wasn’t at Apple’s event and haven’t seen or either device in person, I realized all the photos in the world wouldn’t really give me an accurate idea of how big each of them are. Going a little old school, I decided to get as close as I could to finding out. Taking the dimensions of each device from Apple’s website, I used a rule and pencil to trace out their outline on a piece of paper.

I was genuinely surprised by the result. When I put my iPhone 5 next to it in the Speck case it’s been in since I got it, it was actually wider than the iPhone 6 and just millimeters shorter. The size difference wasn’t much different when I popped it out of the case, particularly the width. There was a much more noticeable difference between the 5 (in or out of case) and the iPhone 6 Plus, but it wasn’t as significant as I would’ve expected. I realized I could use either device comfortably even one-handed for the most part. I also realized that the iPhone 6 Plus would fit into most, but not all, of my pants or jeans pockets. Instead of clarifying the decision, the experience muddied it.

Read more…

Macworld to end print edition

New York Post

Peter Longo, just tapped to be the CEO of a newly formed US Media at International Data Group, is making some sweeping changes that appear to be turning the company’s longtime model on its head.

After 30 years, Macworld is ending its print publication with the November issue. It laid off the bulk of its editorial staffers Wednesday. It will survive only as a digital and expo business in the US, although print editions will still be produced overseas.

The changes are part of a bigger restructuring being put in place by Longo, who is based in New York. His Manhattan base is a big change for the company that has always centered its US publications around Boston and San Francisco.

There were also apparently cutbacks at PC World, TechHive and Greenbot — other digital publications published by IDG, which still counts Boston as its worldwide HQ.

Longo had been the CEO of IDG TechNetwork as well as chief digital officer of the overall IDG. Under his umbrella will be publications including CIO, CSO, Computerworld, Greenbot, InfoWorld, ITWorld, Macworld, Network World, PC World and TechHive.

Macworld was one of the last print titles in the stable. PC World had gone all-digital a year ago. Currently, only CIO is still publishing a print edition in the US.

While editorial was hit Sept. 10, it appears sweeping changes will affect the ad sales force as well in a big consolidation.

“We will transition the IDG Enterprise media sales organization from a brand-based to a geography-based structure to make it simpler for our clients to do business with us,” the company said in a statement.

Continue reading…

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IDG Outlines Plans Following Restructuring

New CEO talks leadership changes, sales strategy, role of print.

Folio

The dust is still settling on a major overhaul of IDG’s U.S. portfolio—a collection of consumer and B2B brands, a burgeoning ad network, more than 100 events and a nascent video unit, chief among its holdings—but its new top exec, Peter Longo, says the company is now better positioned to take advantage of its strengths.

The group also appears to be significantly leaner however. While initial reports noted that editorial staff, including several in leadership roles, would be leaving the company, C-level positions were also impacted. Matt Yorke, CEO of the company’s B2B division, IDG Enterprise, and Bob Melk, CEO of IDG Consumer & SMB, were not among a list of executives for the newly-formed U.S. Media Group provided by the company. IDG would not confirm the departures of any individual employees though.

Screen Shot 2014 09 16 at 12 52 31 PM Macworld to end print edition

Longo noted that the editorial cuts came from both the consumer and B2B sides, though he wouldn’t provide a headcount. A separate industry source says layoffs extended to sales, custom content and events departments, as well.

The moves come as IDG found itself increasingly trapped in a web of legacy processes—a position not unique to IDG, Longo notes. Readers and advertisers moved toward digital platforms, and new products were adopted to meet the evolving demand, but, despite efforts to shift away from print over the years, a structure originally built to handle printed content and direct sales stood in the way of efficiency.

“We’ve had a number of different sales organizations—some direct, some programmatic, some divided by brand—and we felt like moving our owned and operated brands closer toward programmatic and exchange-based solutions was going to benefit them,” Longo says. “One of the immediate changes was moving the consumer properties—Macworld, PC World, Greenbot and TechHive—into our network environment where our network salespeople could continue to represent those properties on a direct basis, but so we’d also make that inventory available on a programmatic basis.”

Continue reading… 

World Tech Update- August 29, 2014

IDG News Service

Coming up on WTU Instagram brings Hyperlapse to the iPhone, Microsoft cuts Surface 2 prices and Google reveals its secret drone delivery program.

 

Tablets with voice calling functions take off in Asia

IDG News Service

Using a tablet to make a phone call may sound unorthodox. But in Asia’s emerging markets, vendors are increasingly shipping 7-inch tablets with voice call functions, according to research firm IDC.

During the second quarter, electronics vendors shipped 13.8 million tablets to the Asia Pacific region, excluding Japan, IDC said on Wednesday. Of those tablets, 25 percent were designed for voice calls over a cellular network. This marked a jump of 10 percentage points from the first quarter.

Voice call tablets are taking off in China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, said Avinash Sundaram, an IDC analyst, who added that it had become a trend unique to Asia.

Although large screen phones are already popular, some consumers in the region have tighter budgets, and want a product that merges all their electronic needs into a single device, Sundaram said.

“They don’t want to walk around with a phone, tablet and PC,” he said. “This is basically addressing budgetary needs.”

Vendors releasing these products include Samsung, which early on incorporated voice call features into its tablets, along with Asus, Huawei and Lenovo. But smaller vendors such as India’s Micromax and Indonesia’s Advan Digital are also fueling the market with rival tablets.

“We definitely see this as a vendor strategy to help differentiate their products,” Sundaram said. Many of these tablets cost between US$100 to $300.

It’s still not known how many consumers in Asia use their tablets for voice calls. But vendors are marketing the features in their advertisements.

“If we look at advertising campaigns in India, Indonesia, they call it a tablet with voice option,” Sundaram said. Vendors could conceivably put cellular features into all their tablets. But bigger companies such as Samsung might refrain from doing so, to better position their smart phone products, he added.

“From a vendor perspective, they want to target every single kind of device, as opposed to selling one kind of device,” he said. “There are no technical hurdles. It’s more about product strategy.”

Where Is Digital Video Viewing Most Popular?

eMarketer

Internet users around the world are tuning in to digital video—whether it’s to watch long-form content like TV shows or movies, short snackable clips, or even branded video content produced by marketers. And according to research among weekly internet users conducted by TNS in June 2014, web users in South Korea are more likely than their counterparts anywhere else in the world to do so.

178307 Where Is Digital Video Viewing Most Popular?

Penetration in the East Asian country reached nearly 96%, meaning virtually anyone who goes online at least weekly also watches digital video with some frequency. Three other countries boasted penetration rates above nine in 10 internet users: Spain, Italy and Mexico. Penetration in China was nearly as high.

It may appear surprising for some of those countries to lead highly developed internet economies like the UK and US in penetration rates, but since the survey was taken among weekly internet users the numbers are somewhat boosted. Overall internet penetration is relatively low in Mexico or India compared to the US—but those who are online are avid digital video viewers.

177922 Where Is Digital Video Viewing Most Popular?

eMarketer estimates that in the US, 77.3% of monthly internet users will watch digital video at least once per month this year, for a total of 195.6 million viewers. Those figures include viewers of any age.

Majority Of Digital Media Consumption Now Takes Place In Mobile Apps

TechCrunch

U.S. users are now spending the majority of their time consuming digital media within mobile applications, according to a new study released by comScore this morning. That means mobile apps, including the number 1 most popular app Facebook, eat up more of our time than desktop usage or mobile web surfing, accounting for 52% of the time spent using digital media. Combined with mobile web, mobile usage as a whole accounts for 60% of time spent, while desktop-based digital media consumption makes up the remaining 40%.

Apps today are driving the majority of media consumption activity, the report claims, now accounting for 7 our of every 8 minutes of media consumption on mobile devices. On smartphones, app activity is even higher, at 88% usage versus 82% on tablets.

App Users

The report also details several interesting figures related to how U.S. app users are interacting with these mobile applications, noting that over one-third today download at least one application per month. The average smartphone user downloads 3 apps per month.

However, something which may not have been well understood before is that much of that download activity is concentrated within a small segment of the smartphone population: the top 7% of smartphone owners accounting for nearly half of all the download activity in a given month. Those are some serious power users, apparently.

But no matter how often consumers are actively downloading apps, they certainly are addicted to them. More than half (57%) use apps every single day, while 26% of tablet owners do. And 79% of smartphone owners use apps nearly every day, saying they use them at least 26 days per month, versus 52% for tablet users.

Facebook Still #1

Here’s another notable tidbit: 42% of all app time on smartphones takes place in that individual’s single most used app. 3 out of 4 minutes is spent in the individual’s top 4 apps. The top brands, which account for 9 out of the top 10 most used apps, include Facebook, Google, Apple, Yahoo, Amazon and eBay.

Facebook is the most used app, in both audience size and share of time spent among each demographic segment.

Social Networking, Games and Radio contribute to nearly half the total time spent on apps, indicating mobile usage is heavily centered around entertainment and communication.

On iPhone, users prefer spending time consuming media, with news apps, radio, photos, social networking, and weather as the highest-ranking categories, while Android users spent more time in search (Google) and email (Gmail).

Click to see charts 

Computerworld.com Integrates Responsive Design Technology and Functionality Enhancements in Site Relaunch

 Computerworld.com Integrates Responsive Design Technology and Functionality Enhancements in Site Relaunch

IDG Enterprise—the leading enterprise technology media company composed of Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, DEMO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld—reveals an enhanced design and greater functionality for Computerworld.com, the voice of business technology. The award-winning site incorporates responsive design technology to create a universal experience by scaling editorial and advertising content to the user’s screen size, whether they are accessing Computerworld.com with a smartphone, tablet or desktop.

“Technology is at the center of business innovation and strategy. Computerworld.com has the most expansive coverage of business-changing technologies that technology and business decision-makers need to understand in this time of digital disruption,” said Matthew Yorke, CEO, IDG Enterprise. “We are excited to relaunch the site using responsive design to create an omnichannel experience for all visitors and advertisers. Computerworld.com has seen continuous growth of traffic from mobile devices, currently it accounts for 25% of our traffic, and our goal is to ensure our visitors have access to the content they need when and where they would like to access it.”

Website Enhancements Include:

  • Computerworld.com built with responsive design, including HTML5 and CSS3, to ensure usability and consistency for visitors using smartphones, tablets or desktops.
  • Expanded editorial coverage areas including Data Analytics, Internet of Things, Emerging Technology, Cloud Computing, Data Center and Enterprise Applications.
  • Visually enticing design improving the reader experience and engagement from story specific keywords with landing pages.
  • Less pagination creating a smoother reading experience without compromising ad impression impact.
  • Single, searchable “Resource Library” supporting all types of lead generation content.
  • Shared functionality across IDG Enterprise sites for seamless execution of banner ads, lead generation and native advertising, making promotions more effective.

The editorial voice, content and design of Computerworld.com remains unique to the brand, while functionality has been aligned across IDG Enterprise sites including back-end capabilities enhancing search functionality and digital asset management for displaying more images and video content. The reader experience is further enhanced by large more legible type and fully integrated social media tools. Ads and promotional units are highlighted in a “deconstructed” right rail optimizing effectiveness and native advertising will be threaded intuitively throughout the site.

“Computerworld.com is well known for its superb tech news. What may be less obvious to website visitors is all the other great content Computerworld serves up for senior technology leaders,” said Scot Finnie, editor in chief, Computerworld. “The editors produce numerous feature articles, how-tos, deep-dives, research, special reports, analyses and case studies. These articles cover enterprise technologies, provide IT management and careers advice, and explore the latest IT trends and emerging technologies. Because such stories have often been less visible on our home page — often whisked away by the rapid stream of tech news — the new home page design relocates the news headlines to a separate column, giving Computerworld’s rich, longer-form enterprise IT content more prominence and air time in the central headline area. This change will paint a far more complete picture of Computerworld’s strong business technology identity.”

About IDG Enterprise
IDG Enterprise, an International Data Group (IDG) company, brings together the leading editorial brands (Computerworld, InfoWorld, Network World, CIO, CSO, ITworld, CFOworld and CITEworld) to serve the information needs of our technology and security-focused audiences. As the premier hi-tech B2B media company, we leverage the strengths of our premium owned and operated brands, while simultaneously harnessing their collective reach and audience affinity. We provide market leadership and converged marketing solutions for our customers to engage IT and security decision-makers across our portfolio of award-winning websites, events, magazines, products and services. IDG’s DEMO conferences provide a platform for today’s most innovative and eye-opening technologies to publically launch their solutions.

Company information is available at www.idgenterprise.com
Follow IDG Enterprise on Twitter: @IDGEnterprise
Follow Computerworld on Twitter: @Computerworld
Like Computerworld on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Computerworld
Join IDG Enterprise on LinkedIn

###

Contact:
Gregory Rosa
Marketing & PR Specialist
IDG Enterprise
grosa@idgenterprise.com
Office: 508.766.5375

Mobile users focus on just a few apps

Warc

American smartphone owners use their favourite app for 42% of all the time they spend accessing apps, a new report into iPhone and Android behaviour has revealed.

According to the US Mobile App Report from comScore, the internet technology research firm, app usage now accounts for over half (52%) of all digital time in the US, but only a few well-known app brands dominate overall usage.

As reported by MediaPost, six big tech brands – Facebook, Google, Apple, Yahoo, Amazon and eBay – account for nine of the top 10 most-used apps, 16 of the top 25, and 24 of the top 50, with Facebook leading for both the largest base of users and the most time spent.

Nearly three-quarters of the time US smartphone users spend with apps is concentrated on just four apps, the report also found, while more than half (57%) access apps every day.

While Facebook and some other brands remain dominant, smaller apps can still achieve success, said Adam Lella, a marketing insights analyst at comScore.

“It certainly means there might be some challenges for smaller players on this medium, but success is also very possible,” he said in comments reported by AdExchanger.

He explained: “We have seen some standalone apps achieve huge audiences on mobile, for example SnapChat and Pandora, while others have found ways to monetise through non-advertising business models that don’t require competing with the larger companies on audience size, like Uber and certain gaming apps.”

The report also noted some behavioural and demographic differences between iPhone and Android users with the former being younger and wealthier.

The median iPhone user earns $85,000 a year compared to $61,000 for Android users, and 43% of iPhone users are aged 18 to 34 versus 39% of Android users.

iPhone users are more likely to use apps to consume media, such as general news and social networks, while Android users focus more on apps for search and email, which comScore attributed to the strong presence of Google Search and Gmail on the platform.

US media groups rely less on ads

Warc

A number of major US media groups have taken a strategic decision to reduce their reliance on advertising revenues, according to new analysis.

After studying the Q2 2014 results and earnings conference calls of CBS, Walt Disney and several other media conglomerates, financial analysts SNL Kagan concluded that some want to boost other sources of revenue, including subscriptions.

Among the examples highlighted in the study, CBS CEO Les Moonves told investors that the company is now “much closer to a 50/50 split of advertising and non-advertising revenue”.

Revenues in its entertainment division fell to $1.84bn in Q2 2014 from $2.01bn in Q2 2013, and CBS intends to earn more from licensing and syndication revenues.

“One of the things that clearly has changed about our businesses is that the back end of the show’s revenue is now as important, if not more important, than the front end from advertising,” Moonves said. “Ownership of content is the key to our success.”

Similarly, Walt Disney is moving to diversify its revenue streams, SNL Kagan said, pointing to recent comments from Disney CEO, Bob Iger.

“We’ve made a conscious decision as a company to essentially not be as reliant on advertising as we were in the past. So it represents probably somewhat in the neighbourhood of the low-20% range of our total revenue,” Iger said.

Disney has become less reliant on advertising partly because of increased revenues from other sources, such as its theme parks.

Despite this, Iger said Disney will continue to participate in digital advertising although he thought traditional advertising platforms would continue to come under pressure.

When looking at some other media groups, the report said NBCUniversal Media had a weak quarter in terms of advertising revenue, which fell 2.2%.

And there was a mixed picture for 21st Century Fox, which posted both big declines in advertising revenue in its TV segment but large increases for its cable networks.