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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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There Is Now a New iPhone App that Encrypts Calls and Texts

WIRED

IF YOU OWN an iPhone or Android handset and care about your privacy, there’s no longer much of an excuse not to encrypt every conversation you have. Now a free, zero-learning-curve app exists for both text and voice that can keep those communications fully encrypted, so that no one but the person holding the phone on the other end can decipher your words.

On Monday the open-source encryption software group Open Whisper Systems announced a new upgrade to Signal, its iOS app that enables end-to-end encrypted voice calling. With the update, Signal will end-to-end encrypt text messaging, too. And in WIRED’s testing of that updated all-in-one app, it’s just as idiot-proof as the two most basic, lime-green iPhone communication buttons it replaces.

“The objective is to be a complete, transparent replacement for secure communications,” says Open Whisper Systems founder Moxie Marlinspike. “We want to have a texting and calling experience that’s actually better than the default experience and is also private.”

In fact, the Signal update completes a suite of mobile encryption apps that Marlinspike has been developing for nearly five years. In May of 2010, Marlinspike released Redphone and Textsecure for Android, two apps that enabled end-to-end encrypted voice calls (using VoIP and the ZRTP protocol developed by PGP creator Phil Zimmermann) and text messages. But users of those apps could communicate only with other Redphone and TextSecure users, leaving iPhone users in the cold. Soon after, Marlinspike’s startup Whisper Systems was acquired by Twitter, putting his encryption app work on a two-year hiatus.

Marlinspike left Twitter in 2013, and in July of 2014 his newly recreated Open Whisper Systems released Signal, a free voice-calling app that’s interoperable with Redphone. That meant iPhone users could have free, secure voice conversations with their Android owning-friends (and each other).

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Ethernet Switch Market Increased 3.8% Year-Over-Year in Fourth Quarter of 2014

IDC PMS4colorversion no shadow Ethernet Switch Market Increased 3.8% Year Over Year in Fourth Quarter of 2014

The worldwide Ethernet switch market (Layer 2/3) revenues reached a record $6.2 billion in the fourth quarter of 2014 (4Q14), representing an increase of 3.8% year over year and 3.6% over the previous quarter. For the full year 2014, the market expanded by 3.9% over 2013. Meanwhile, the worldwide total router market reversed recent year-over-year declines, growing 2.5% year over year and 5.6% sequentially. However, the router market contracted -0.6% for the full year 2014, according to the preliminary results published in the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly Ethernet Switch Trackerand the Worldwide Quarterly Router Tracker.

From a geographic perspective, the 4Q14 results saw a break in recent trends with the Ethernet switch market seeing its highest growth in Latin America, which increased at a strong 13.8% year over year and 24.4% on a sequential basis. The Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) region also performed well, growing 7.0% year over year and 8.8% sequentially. North America grew more modestly at 2.5% year over year, while contracting -1.8% sequentially. On the other hand, the Asia/Pacific region, including Japan (APJ), was essentially flat year over year (increasing 0.7%), but was more in line with global results sequentially (up 4.1%).

“Despite precipitous price erosion, 10Gb Ethernet is the primary growth driver of the Ethernet switching market, with 40Gb Ethernet growing in stature quickly, as datacenters seek greater capacity to deliver a feverishly proliferating ecosystem of enterprise and cloud applications,” said Rohit Mehra, Vice President, Network Infrastructure at IDC. “The 1Gb Ethernet market remains important to the enterprise campus network, although price declines will potentially challenge market growth.”

10Gb Ethernet switch (Layer 2/3) revenue increased 5.2% year over year to reach $2.3 billion while 10Gb Ethernet switch port shipments grew a robust 24.4% year over year to reach nearly 6.8 million ports shipped in 4Q14 as average selling prices continue to fall. 40Gb Ethernet continues to rapidly grow as a stand-alone segment and now accounts for more than $520 million in revenue per quarter with year-over-year growth of more than 100%. 10Gb and 40Gb Ethernet continue to be the primary drivers of the overall Ethernet switch market.

 

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Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

PCMag

This is the second time PCMag has had some hands-on time with the Apple Watch. The first time was in September, when Cupertino’s smartwatch was first announced. We were not allowed to put it on, and although we could tap a few buttons, it was pretty clear the watch was in demo mode and only capable of a limited number of tasks.

As a result, most of the story involved how it looked, which admittedly is pretty important for a smartwatch. Looks are the biggest reason people don’t want to wear watches. The other reason is that no one seems really clear on why they need a smartwatch.

 Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

Yesterday, I got the chance to try on a fully operational Apple Watch for the first time. It is no slam dunk, but this watch does a lot more than people realize.

Before we get into the details, it is important to understand where the smartwatch market is today. Smartwatches kind of suck. Big companies like Samsung, LG, and Sony have released multiple models, and none of them have been very successful. The only real success in the space has been the Pebble, a small Kickstarter-backed firm whose modest product has found a number of fans, but is hardly a household name. Despite the best efforts of the consumer electronics industry, there is little sign that consumers really want a smartwatch.

But Apple, of course, is different. And so is its smartwatch. For the purposes of this story I want to look at the Apple Watch from three perspectives: The Watch, the Smarts, and the Apps.

To succeed, Apple needs to do something every other smartwatch vendor has never done before in all three categories: succeed, across the board. It won’t be easy. When Piper Jaffray recently polled 968 iPhones owners, only 7 percent said they would buy an Apple Watch. Then again, they have never tried one on. And they certainly don’t know what it does. Those users will get the chance to see the Apple Watch in Apple Stores on April 10. It will be available for sale on April 24.

The Watch
The first hurdle Apple needs to clear is to simply build a great watch. In an age when most of us rely on our phones to tell the time, that is no small feat. Ironically, this may be where Apple is strongest. The Apple Watch face is a solid piece of metal, either aluminum, steel, or a preposterously priced solid gold version (starting price: $10,000.)

Even in its more affordable aluminum and steel construction, it looks and feels like a $349 watch—that is no small feat. A lot will be made of the bands; there are six different styles and multiple colors. All of them feel well-made, although the Sport line is the most plasticky. Even so, the bands will be interchangeable so one watch face can have multiple looks.

Battery life is 18 hours, so more than enough for one day, but not enough for two. As a watch, this is a downside, but unless you are using an e-ink display like the Pebble, it is to be expected.

The watch face itself seems nearly infinitely customizable. You can scroll between digital, analog, hybrid, and even animated watch faces with a few clicks. There is even an animated Mickey Mouse face that will point out the hour and minutes, although it was a little too animated for my taste.

 Hands On With a Working Apple Watch

But that is the thing, it allows you to customize the face to your individual tastes. The Pebble also does a great job with this, but Apple’s options seem just as robust.

Learning how to navigate the tiny touch screen, however, will take some time. There is a home button, a rotating smart crown, and the touch screen itself. All of them initiate actions. The Smart Crown is pretty sweet, and has the advantage of keeping the screen clear while you navigate. I have more trouble mastering the deep force click—basically pressing harder—but it is just a new UI trick, and will take time to learn. Once I started thinking of it as equivalent to a “right click” it made more sense to me. Suffice to say, it is more complicated than your average watch, but it is learnable.

To me, the first hurdle is cleared. It looks and works like a watch. And a pretty cool one that can be customized with lots of different faces and bands.

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IDG Communications Names Josh London Chief Marketing Officer

BusinessWire

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–International Data Group (IDG)—the world’s leading technology media, events and research company – today named Josh London to the newly created position of Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) for IDG Communications. London will lead a global, company-wide amplification of the IDG Communications brand, enhancing the company’s reputation as a global tech media, data and services company.

London Josh photo IDG Communications Names Josh London Chief Marketing Officer

London will direct the corporate worldwide marketing organization and the company’s go-to-market strategy to enhance the customer experience at all touch points. Based in New York, London reports to Michael Friedenberg, CEO, IDG Communications Worldwide, and is a member of IDG’s executive team.

“IDG is very excited to welcome Josh to the team,” said Michael Friedenberg. “Josh is an exceptional marketing executive with a stellar background in turning ideas into marketable products and services with customer appeal. We look forward to amplifying our position and value proposition to serve the most influential buyers and sellers of technology in the world.”

“We are witness to a transformative time in the media industry. IDG stands alone as an innovator among technology media companies with its premium brands, audiences, data, events and services,” said London. “I am incredibly excited to join the passionate team at IDG Communications and to lead the corporate marketing team at this pivotal moment in the company’s history.”

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IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

 IDG Enterprise: 2015 Big Data and Analytics Research

Framingham, Mass.—March 9, 2015—IDG Enterprise— the leading enterprise technology media company composed of CIO, Computerworld, CSO, DEMO, InfoWorld, ITworld and Network World—announces the release of the 2015 Big Data and Analytics research, which spotlights an increase in the number of deployed data-driven projects over the past year and reveals that many organizations are still planning implementations, as 83% of organizations categorize structured data initiatives as a high or critical priority. IT decision-makers (ITDMs) also provided insight into organizational data and analytics purchase plans, security concerns and the top vendor attributes when evaluating solutions in 2015.

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Survey

 

2015 Big Data and Analytics Infographic

Can print media make it ‘over the top’?

Capital New York

On a Tuesday afternoon in early February, Time Inc. C.E.O. Joe Ripp was onstage in a ballroom at the New York Marriott Marquis, gabbing with several other top magazine executives—during a discussion moderated by the ever-skeptical media critic Michael Wolff—about the precarious state of their business.

As with most panels that parse the trials and tribulations of media companies married to print, it wasn’t long before the conversation turned to that younger, sexier, more … animated medium they’ve all been getting in bed with: digital video. Ripp, for one, was particularly hot on the type of emerging technology that’s been steering people away from cable boxes and into the on-demand world of mobile viewing and devices like Roku and Apple TV.

“Everyone’s coming out with a subscription, over-the-top model,” said Ripp, using the industry jargon that describes a growing array of streaming Internet television services. “In this new world,” Ripp continued, sprinkling on an extra dash of jargon, “I look at this as an opportunity to create new video opportunities.”

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Bloomberg’s Justin Smith: ‘Platforms have done a better job at media.’

DIGIDAY

It has been a year and a half since Justin Smith became the global CEO of the Bloomberg Media Group with the mandate of making the Bloomberg LP media arm a household name with business executives around the world. Since then, Bloomberg Media has made a slew of new hires across sales, marketing and editorial. The unit has introduced Bloomberg Politics, with other verticals to follow, and relaunched its flagship site, Bloomberg.com.

In an interview, Smith talked about how publishers can compete with Facebook, why print still has a place at Bloomberg, and what he admires about Snapchat.

Bloomberg Media just launched a new ad campaign. What’s the message you’re hoping to get out?
The thing that we’ve been doing, and the reason I came to Bloomberg, is that I believe we’re one of the few companies — large, established, global media companies — that’s truly trying to marry the best of traditional with the most cutting-edge approaches and formats that are emerging from startup media. There’s a global road show, and we’re getting positive feedback. So while the brand has been well-known, I think the exciting part of these conversations is some of the new products. We’re already seeing double-digit traffic growth on the unique front as well as on the page view front.

Which startups do you look to for inspiration?
It’s hard not to admire what all the technology platforms have achieved, from Google to Facebook to LinkedIn and Snapchat now. They are at-scale, large organizations; they have figured out modern media in a better way than traditional media has. To look at how those technology platforms have created mobile content interfaces that have become market-leading, or advertising solutions they have developed that are market-leading or beating because of their measurability — they have to be the first stop in any media watcher’s process.

Publishers are approaching them with some wariness, though. Where do you stand?

I think it’s interesting that traditional publishers always complain about the platforms taking away eyeballs and not sharing. This frenemy type of dynamic: Facebook being the latest focus. The reason for their complaint is quite simple: These platforms have done a better job at media than media themselves. They’ve created better media content mousetraps. They are to a large extent wiping the table on digital advertising solutions that are measurable and data-driven.

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Mobile networks limber up for the Internet of Things

CITEworld

Changes starting to take place behind the scenes in mobile networks may eventually pay dividends to anyone with a smartphone, a connected refrigerator or an IT department.

Carriers have done things pretty much the same way for years, with cellular base stations at the edge of their networks feeding into a series of specialized appliances at central facilities. Now they’re virtualizing those networks in several ways, seeking the same rewards that enterprises have reaped by virtualizing data centers: efficiency and flexibility. The trend will be in full swing at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona next month.

It’s good news for mobile users that they may not hear much about. A more efficient network leaves more free capacity for the video or application you want to run, and a more flexible carrier could quickly launch services in the future that you don’t even know you’ll need yet. The new architectures may even change how some businesses pay for mobile services.

Just as enterprises used to buy separate servers for each application, carriers often use dedicated hardware for each function involved in delivering a service, such as billing and authentication. Years of mergers have left multiple legacy platforms, adding to the mess. As a result, rolling out a new service for a customer, such as a VPN, can take weeks.

The new approach that’s gaining ground, called NFV (network functions virtualization), turns each piece of the puzzle into software that can run on standard computing hardware.

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The future of ‘everywhere ergonomic’ technology

IDG Connect 0811 The future of ‘everywhere ergonomic’ technology

It’s difficult to avoid adverts or news stories about the amazing technological feats the modern ‘intelligent car’ can perform. One of the most impressive is that a vehicle can now ‘know’ its position on the road, sense when it may be veering into another lane and transmit a warning vibration through the seat to jolt a drowsy driver into attention.

This type of technological innovation that makes our lives safer and easier to navigate is set to extend to the workplace. Already, there are smart chairs that measure our posture and how long we’ve been sitting, as well as smart work surfaces that know when we’re present.

In a recent interview with the Economist Intelligence Unit on ‘The Future of Work’, (sponsored byRicoh Europe), Alan Hedge, Director of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University, points out that this type of technology is just the start, “we are at the very beginning of a revolution in ‘active’ objects and products that have sensors built into them.”

Professor Hedge terms this interaction between people and design technology ‘everywhere ergonomics’. While smart chairs and surfaces may not have made their way to all workplaces just yet, many people will already be using everywhere ergonomics at home. It’s only a matter of time before the boom in wearable devices begins to have a transformative effect on the workplace. Think back to how the widespread adoption of smartphones kick-started the shift to mobile working promised by portable computers years earlier. I believe this boom could be bigger.

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Photoshop at 25: A Thriving Chameleon Adapts to an Instagram World

New York Times

The history of digital technology is full of innovations that are praised for having changed the world: the Mac, Microsoft Windows, the Netscape Navigator browser, the iPod and countless others. Then there are the many products that changed the world and were suddenly overtaken by some newer, supposedly better thing: the Mac, Microsoft Windows, Netscape Navigator, the iPod and countless others.

What’s rarer in tech is the product that causes major changes, hits turbulence and then, after some nimble adjustment, finds a surprising new audience.

This week is the 25th birthday of one such aging chameleon, Adobe Photoshop, an image-editing program that was created when we snapped pictures on film and displayed them on paper. It has not just survived but thrived through every major technological transition in its lifetime: the rise of the web, the decline of print publishing, the rise and fall of home printing and the supernova of digital photography.

Photoshop attained the rare status of a product that became a verb — like Google and Xerox. Along the way, it became a lightning rod for controversy because of, among other things, the way it can be used to turn women’s bodies into unnatural magazine-cover icons, or its use by propagandists and your casually mendacious social-networking buddies who doctor their vacation snaps.

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