Digital Media Events
Event Date Location

Game Marketing Summit

04/23/2014 San Francisco CA

WWW.AMA.ORG : WEB & DIGITAL ANALYTICS – CHICAGO

04/24/2014 Chicago IL

Digiday Brand Summit

04/27/2014 - 04/29/2014 Nashville TN

Event Marketing Summit

05/07/2014 - 05/09/2014 Salt Lake CIty Utah

Digiday Programmatic Summit

05/14/2014 - 05/16/2014 New Orleans LA

Internet Week New York

05/19/2014 - 05/25/2014 New York NY

E3

06/10/2014 - 06/12/2014 Los Angeles CA

Digiday Agency Innovation Camp

06/24/2014 - 06/26/2014 Vail CO

Content Marketing World

09/08/2014 - 09/11/2014 Cleveland OH

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Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Social Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Digital Media Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Advertising and Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, ideas and blogs about Lead Generation Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

Tech Marketing Guide to B2B

News, video, events, blogs about Mobile Marketing for high tech business-to-business from IDG Knowledge Hub.

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What’s The Point Of Multi-screen?

MediaPost

I have been writing about second screen before and the definition of what the first screen is and what it can do. Obviously, this topic becomes more interesting to me, now that I work for a company offering the sync between TV and 2nd screen, or TV and digital if you like. But this isn’t a sales pitch, rather an evaluation of what’s happening in the market.

Emarketer’s recent report confirms what many studies have shown over the past few months: our engagement with TV, particularly during the ad breaks, is moving from the TV screen to the mobile, tablet, laptop screens or even portable gaming devices. Interesting enough, though, this particular reports says, the engagement is primarily on the TV screen and not the mobile screen.

Again, this is the chicken-and-egg situation, as most things in digital, whether the main screen is the TV or the mobile one. I use the mobile screen as a synonym for “portable” screens. The study further suggests that when using predominately smartphones we are engaging more on searching the web than on social media. And of social media, sites like Facebook and Twitter seem to be on top, and it could be non-related to what’s happening on TV at all, e.g., no hashtag or show following or liking.

In many discussions, I found out that everyone knows of a correlation between TV and mobile screens. No one knows exactly what and how but, of course, knows there is one. I am not disclosing my secrets here if I say that those screens go hand in hand. We as a nation, as humans, engage more and more with our mobile devices. We use them to check our bank statements, our social status, our text messages, emails, forums, or search for ideas, order books or toys or groceries. The mobile is our daily device with wearable tech usage and usability growing to become connected to mobiles and monitoring us 24/7.

Read more…

What Is the Future of Proximity Marketing?

eMarketer

Embattled by stiff online competition, brick-and-mortar retailers are looking to the internet for inspiration to improve the in-store experience. Online cookies, pixels and social logins track the shopper across the web, offering insights that ecommerce sites in turn rely on to advertise and merchandise effectively. A slew of new proximity platforms offer comparable tools for brick-and-mortar retailers, according to a new eMarketer report, “Proximity Marketing in Retail: Can Ecommerce Tactics Revive Brick-and-Mortar?”

Although aspects of proximity marketing—targeted marketing with a geographic radius of roughly 100 meters—have been in place for nearly a decade, the field is still new enough to make it extremely difficult to forecast. Its uptake depends on two overarching factors: retailer interest and consumer acceptance.

Right now, the only thing that everyone agrees on is that 2014 will be filled with small-scale tests to see whether the latest generation of proximity platforms can significantly improve the shopper experience and the retailer’s bottom line. Beyond that, opinions are split. On the bullish side, some foresee a radically transformed environment in which the world is, in essence, a personalized and interactive catalog to be browsed and shopped with a smartphone or wearable device. At the other end of the spectrum are those who expect the widespread testing of proximity platforms to show them unready for scaling and hampered by fragmented services, operational complexities and consumer reservations about privacy.

Continue reading…

 

Infographic: How To Engage Millennials Who Visit Tech Sites

ResearchLogoBLACK no 2nd IDG Infographic: How To Engage Millennials Who Visit Tech Sites

Knowing how to engage with Millennials who visit technology sites can be tricky. IDG Research Services conducted a survey of Millennials (18-34 years old) who have an interest in technology: tech marketers, tech buyers, and consumers in both B2C and B2B. The survey reveals which tech topics Millennials are most interested in, their top reasons for visiting websites, and which sources they rely on most for tech-related information. View the Millennials infographic now…

Click to view a related infographic on this research, How Millennials Feel About Data Targeting and Online Privacy

Mills what they consume Edited Infographic: How To Engage Millennials Who Visit Tech Sites

Reminder: Nobody Has a Clue How Many Wearable Devices Will Sell in 2018

Time.com

Even more than with most gadgets, this category’s future is shrouded in mystery

Jason Snell of Macworld thinks that the pundits who think it’s absolutely vital that Apple dive into the smartwatch market–such as analyst Trip Chowdhry, who predicts doom if the company doesn’t make a move by next month (!!!)–are a tad overexcited. Referencinganother post by iMore’s Rene Ritchie, Jason argues that smartphones are going to remain by far the biggest, most profitable category of gadget for years to come, even if they aren’t as much fun to talk about as a nascent field like wearables.

Jason and Rene are two of the smartest people who write about tech, and both of their pieces are well worth reading. I agree with most of what they say. But in his piece, Jason buttresses his skepticism by quoting some stats from research firm IDC, which is part of my former employer IDG:

IDC reported that in 2013, one billion smartphones were shipped, up 38 percent from the previous year. That’s a fast-growing market worth hundreds of billions of dollars. Meanwhile, on Thursday IDC predicted that the wearables market will reach 112 million units in 2018.

In other words, in four years the wearables market might grow to be one-tenth the size of today’s smartphone market—in units shipped. Presumably the average selling price of wearable items will be a fraction of that of smartphones, meaning the dollar value of the wearables market is even more minuscule compared to the smartphone market.

Continue reading…

IDG Connect Buyer Research Proves Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors’ Bottom Line

IDG Connect 0811 IDG Connect Buyer Research Proves Irrelevant Digital Content Impacts B2B Vendors’ Bottom Line

IDG Connect’s survey of over 200 enterprise technology decision makers within organizations of 1,000 or more employees shows that vendors are not creating content that is relevant to their needs when making purchase decisions:

“A strong potential ROI case can be made for attaining a sufficient level of relevance”

  • 66% of technology buyers feel that digital content needs to be more aligned with organizational objectives and relevant to the decision making process.
  • 79% of buyers said that vendors’ level of relevant content affects their likelihood to make the shortlist.
  • Vendors are 25% less likely to make the shortlist if their content does not meet a minimum level of relevance.

This highlights an urgent need for vendors to understand the full buying process and the various content types and formats buyers need at different stages of the journey.

“If vendors do not improve their understanding of what makes content relevant, they will continue to frustrate buyers,” explains Bob Johnson, principal analyst and VP at IDG Connect.

Johnson adds, “Vendors need to realize the impact that their digital content has on not just filling the funnel with leads but in moving buyers through the funnel. A lack of alignment with organizational needs and relevance to the individual buying team member will cause vendors to lose opportunities before they come into view. This will impact their bottom line.”

“A strong potential ROI case can be made for attaining a sufficient level of relevance,” he concludes. “Now lines-of-business exert even more power over technology-related investment decisions; the requirement is more complicated but also has never been more important.”

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Windows XP Migration and Commercial Spending Helped Offset Weak Consumer PC Demand in the First Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

IDC PMS4colorversion  Windows XP Migration and Commercial Spending Helped Offset Weak Consumer PC Demand in the First Quarter of 2014, According to IDC

Worldwide PC shipments totaled 73.4 million units in the first quarter of 2014 (1Q14), a decline of -4.4% year on year, according to the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly PC Tracker. Although still in decline and with continuing weakness in consumer and emerging market segments, the preliminary results are slightly better than a projected decline of -5.3%.

Similar to the latter part of 2013, the upside in the first quarter arose primarily from demand in mature commercial markets. Commercial refresh projects, which had already been protracted, received a last push from the impending end of Windows XP support, particularly in Japan. In addition, slowing demand for tablets seems to have helped constrain previously drastic cutbacks in notebooks. Nevertheless, emerging regions continued to post weak results, with growth in Latin America and Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan)(APeJ) falling even faster than recent declines as both economic conditions and continued tablet penetration stifled PC shipments.

“Worldwide PC shipments have now declined for eight consecutive quarters as a result of shifting technology usage and competition (notably with tablets & smartphones) as well as economic pressures (including high unemployment, slow growth & investment, tight credit, and currency fluctuations) related to the Great Recession, sovereign debt crises, and their related impact on international trade,” said Loren Loverde, Vice President, Worldwide PC Trackers. “The economic front seems to be gradually stabilizing and/or improving. However, this has been a slow process, and it is unlikely that sovereign debt issues will be resolved soon or that growth in emerging markets like China will return to prior levels. On the technology front, the transition to more mobile devices and usage modes is unlikely to stop, although the short term impact on PC shipments may slow as tablet penetration rises – as we’ve begun to see in some mature regions. The net result remains consistent with our past forecasts – in particular, that there is potential for PC shipments to stabilize, but not much opportunity for growth.”

“PC shipment growth in the United States remained slightly faster than most other regions in the first quarter. However, the passing boost from XP replacements, constrained consumer demand, and no clear driver of a market rebound are expected to keep growth below zero going forward,” said Rajani Singh, Senior Research Analyst, Personal Computing. “A rebound in consumer or a continuation of accelerated commercial upgrades could boost growth slightly, but low demand for upgrades in general combined with competition from tablets and 2-in-1 systems limit the growth potential.”

Continue reading…

Welcome to the Connected Age

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 Welcome to the Connected Age

An IDC study present’s the first forecast and analysis of the cellular machine-to-machine (M2M) market in Asia/Pacific (excluding Japan), or APEJ. The total number of cellular M2M connections in APEJ will grow from 26.8 million connections in 2012 to 72.4 million in 2017, a 22% compound annual growth rate (CAGR). M2M spending will grow from US$3 billion in 2012 to US$6.7 billion in 2017, a CAGR of 17.3%.

Another IDC study analyzes the worldwide opportunity for the burgeoning “Internet of Things” (IoT) market. It provides a market outlook for 2013–2020 and sets the forecast within the context of the IoT ecosystem including intelligent systems, connectivity services, platforms, analytics, and vertical applications in addition to the security and professional services required to build out a complete picture. The study discusses the key market trends contributing to the growth of the IoT on a worldwide basis. A forecast of installed “things” and revenue is included.

More IDC infographics can be viewed here.

welcome to connected age Welcome to the Connected Age

MEA Enterprise Hardware Market Sees Constrained Growth

IDC PMS4colorversion 1 MEA Enterprise Hardware Market Sees Constrained Growth

The Middle East and Africa (MEA) enterprise hardware market, comprising servers and external storage, remains in a passive state according to the latest figures released today by International Data Corporation (IDC). Referencing its EMEA Quarterly Server and Disk Storage Systems Trackers, the research firm today announced that the market expanded a sluggish 5.1% year on year in 2013 to total $2.58 billion, with much of the growth spurred by infrastructure deals within the oil and gas (O&G), telecommunications, and BFSI verticals.

The MEA region’s x86 server market witnessed a 5.0% year-on-year increase in value, but a 3.7% decline in unit terms during 2013. “There are a lot of changes occurring in the MEA enterprise domain, with a gradual shift towards fully virtualized datacenters and cloud-based infrastructures,” says Zeeshan Gaya, research manager for systems and infrastructure solutions at IDC Middle East, Africa, and Turkey. “As such, the growth seen in the x86 server market’s value, and the corresponding decline in volume, can be attributed to the increased adoption of virtualization technologies that utilize fewer server units than is the case in traditional datacenters.”

The region’s external storage market expanded 5.1% year on year in 2013. ”The overall sentiment in the MEA storage market ended on a positive note in 2013, with most countries witnessing healthy growth barring a few in Africa,” says Swapna Subramani, senior research analyst for storage systems at IDC Middle East, Africa, and Turkey. “The storage market is witnessing increased uptake of entry-level and midrange storage devices driven by demand for the NAS protocol. Mobility and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) initiatives, video surveillance, and Big Data are the key driving factors for this ongoing shift within the MEA storage market.”

UAE’s enterprise hardware market witnessed a strong growth of 11.5% with 2013 revenue representing a healthy mix of spending by the country’s key verticals namely, Financial, Telco, Hospitality and Government sectors. Saudi Arabia’s growth was more subdued at 3.2% annually hampered by the small decline in the server market this year compared to the massive server revenue registered in the Kingdom last year.

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5 Behaviors of Digital Performance

CIO Dashboard

In our 2014 Digital IQ survey of almost 1,500 business and technology executives, only 20% of respondents are highly confident in their organization’s Digital IQ—a company’s acumen in understanding, valuing and weaving technology throughout the enterprise.

How can a company raise its Digital IQ and harness the full power of technology to advance their business performance? Top performers—companies that reside in the top quartile for revenue growth, profitability, and innovation—point the way.

We analyzed the responses of top performers to understand what they do differently to fuse business and technology. For top performers, digital isn’t window dressing or corporate speak. Digital is a way of life. Following are five key best practices that top performers employ to outdo the competition:

1. CEO is the Digital Leader

81% of top performers say their CEO is an active champion of using information technology to achieve business goals, compared with 68% of other companies. Executives tell us that CEO involvement in shaping strategy provides them with a competitive advantage. Once the company determines its digital strategy, the CEO must define clear roles, accountability, and governance for how the strategy is executed. The scope should address who is responsible, and how the functional or business unit leaders will work together—for example, what the CMO is responsible for in a customer initiative, what the CIO does, and together what they will deliver and when.

2. CMO and CIO are Collaborative Partners

The CIO and CMO relationship is critical to success because many digital technology initiatives are driven by marketing needs. 70% of top performers say their CIO and CMO have a strong relationship, compared with just 45% of the pack. The growth in digital marketing spending, often independent of IT, has led to debate among industry analysts about whether the marketing organization will soon yield more spending power than the IT department.

Click to continue reading the five key best practices

The rise of mobile apps and the decline of the open web — a threat or an over-reaction?

Gigaom

As the use of mobile devices continues to climb, the use of dedicated apps is also increasing — but is this a natural evolution, or should we be worried about apps winning and the open web losing? Chris Dixon, a partner with venture-capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, argues in a recent blog post that we should be concerned, because it is creating a future in which the web becomes a “niche product,” and the dominant environment is one of proprietary walled gardens run by a couple of web giants — and that this is bad for innovation.

Dixon’s evidence consists in part of two recent charts: one is from the web analytics company comScore, and shows that mobile usage has overtaken desktop usage — an event that occurred in January of this year. The second chart is from Flurry, which tracks app usage, and it shows that apps account for the vast majority of time spent vs. the mobile web, an amount that Flurry says is still growing. I’ve combined the two charts into one (somewhat ugly) graphic below:

If apps are winning, is the web losing?

The implication of all this is obvious, says Dixon. Mobile is the future, and what wins on mobile will win the internet — and “right now, apps are winning and the web is losing.” Not only that, but Dixon argues that the problem is likely to get worse, as more companies realize that an app gives them much more control over the user experience than a website. And with less and less investment in making the web experience better on mobile, it will continue to deteriorate, which in turn will push users even further towards the use of apps.

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